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This seems inefficient or ugly or for whatever reason, I would like it to be more elegant

if (a > b) {
    recurseWith(a);
    recurseWith(b);
else {
    recurseWith(b);
    recurseWith(a);
}

In my code a and b are longer, and the parameters to the new function are more bulky, and it just looks lame. Is there a way to clean this up?

The order matters because they work with a global variable and, well, this code just works.

I'm looking for a solution in Java

-Austin

share|improve this question
    
How about writing a method that returns an ordered list of objects that will be parameters to recurseWith()? Then you could iterate over the list and call recurseWith() on each item. – jahroy Nov 28 '12 at 4:10

Will following logic not help here ?

if(a<=b) swap(a,b);

recurseWith(a);
recurseWith(b);
share|improve this answer
    
this is fine. I'm using ArrayLists, so to swap them might require me to create a swap method, which is more code elsewhere. Good to have in my mental toolkit at least. Thanks! – austin Nov 28 '12 at 4:06
    
you can upvote and/or mark my answer correct as well if you accept the logic :) – saury Nov 28 '12 at 4:14

I don't have a good answer, but depending on the grossness/longness of the parameters can hide them in a Runnable so you only have to write them once. Your decide whether this is "cleaner". It's going to look worse here, because we're using a and b.

Runnable aRunnable = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        recurseWith(a);
    }
}

Runnable bRunnable = new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        recurseWith(b);
    }
}

if (a > b) {
    aRunnable.run();
    bRunnable.run();
else {
    bRunnable.run();
    aRunnable.run();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I like! Never used a Runnable before. Thanks – austin Nov 28 '12 at 4:05
    
That does absolutely no good. If he simply wants subroutines for a complex "recurseWith" invocation he can write subroutines. No need for Runnables. – Hot Licks Nov 28 '12 at 4:05
    
But how would he pass all of the gross arguments to that subroutine? He would have to pass them grossly, again. This lets you use the fact that the variables are in scope when you define the Runnable to your advantage. – Cory Kendall Nov 28 '12 at 4:07
    
It seems awfully wrong to use a Runnable just to clean up the appearence of code. Not to mention the fact that the whole point of his task is to do things synchronously (in a specified order). Using Runnables would completely ignore this requirement! – jahroy Nov 28 '12 at 4:08
1  
It might make sense if you made use of the function aspect of it, but you didn't. You might, eg, assign runnableA to x and runnableB to y for the greater-than case and vice-versa for less-equal case. Then you could just invoke x and y in order, with no further ifs. No help in this toy example, but perhaps useful in a more complex case. But simply creating the objects does no real good -- just confusion and overhead. – Hot Licks Nov 28 '12 at 19:07

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