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I noticed this (oddity?) when playing around with code related to a:link around div - styling inside div

Given this HTML:

<a id="foo" href="foobar">
  <div id="bar">
    <h2 id="baz">Foo</h2>
  </div>
</a>

And this CSS (background colors added to show structure):

a {
  display: block;
  padding: 20px;
  background-color: rgb(240,240,240);
}

#bar {
  width: 200px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: rgb(220,220,220);
}

#baz {
  padding: 20px;
  text-decoration: none;
}

Fiddle


Chrome shows the matched CSS rules as containing text-decoration: none; yet the text is indeed underlined:

Chrome Console


Similarly, using Firebug, Firefox returns null for the textDecoration computed style:

Firebug

MDN says that text-decoration applies to all elements.

I realize there's an easy workaround of just applying the text-decoration property to the a link, but this is not the behavior I would have expected. Can anyone explain this (apparent) discrepancy?

Edit: I believe the answer is here: Line Decoration: Underline, Overline, and Strike-Through

When specified on or propagated to a block container that establishes an inline formatting context, the decorations are propagated to an anonymous inline box that wraps all the in-flow inline-level children of the block container.

But I still don't completely understand what's going on.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Chrome and Firefox underline hyperlinks by default, as you're probably aware.

What's happening here is that while text-decoration gets computed to none on #baz (as specified in your CSS rule), the used value ends up being underline as a result of propagating the browser's default style from its ancestor, the a element. This used value replaces the computed value when rendering the page onto the canvas, but as far as the DOM is concerned, the computed value remains none, based on cascade resolution alone.

So, the discrepancy here lies in the difference between a computed value and a used value. The definitions can be found in section 6.1.

This behavior of propagating text-decoration values into descendant boxes, which takes place independently of the cascade, is outlined here:

When specified on or propagated to an inline element, it affects all the boxes generated by that element, and is further propagated to any in-flow block-level boxes that split the inline (see section 9.2.1.1).

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+1 first answer that actually addresses the question! –  Joseph Silber Nov 28 '12 at 5:00
    
Turns out this behavior is more complicated than I thought (usually the case with me ;-) Merely adding position: fixed/absolute or float: left/right also removes the underline as it removes the element from the inline flow. Fiddle –  steveax Nov 28 '12 at 5:03
    
@steveax: Yeah, most of that is covered in the prose for text-decoration, and even then some parts are left out in CSS2.1, e.g. block-level tables. (Are they in text-decor-3 yet?) –  BoltClock Nov 28 '12 at 5:05
    
I'm gonna accept this one (and why am I not surprised BoltClock got the accept?) but I think it's not really the difference between the computed and used values, but rather due to decorations are propagated to an anonymous inline box that wraps all the in-flow inline-level children of the block container. Certainly close enough though! –  steveax Nov 28 '12 at 5:19
    
@steveax: Ah, I'd interpreted your question as asking why there was a discrepancy in computed and rendered values while already being aware of the propagating behavior. Also, no need to flatter me ;) –  BoltClock Nov 28 '12 at 5:21

"text-decoration" is the property of 'a' tag... so just add it to 'a' tag and its working...see the demo here

a {
  display: block;
  padding: 20px;
  background-color: rgb(240,240,240);
  text-decoration: none;
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 OP specifically stated in the question that he's aware of that. The question was why. –  Joseph Silber Nov 28 '12 at 4:27
    
Again, not my question. To restate: why do the browsers report the element as not having text-decoration? –  steveax Nov 28 '12 at 4:28
    
""text-decoration" is the property of 'a' tag" What??? –  BoltClock Nov 28 '12 at 4:40
1  
@steveax: Yes, 'text-decoration' applies for all the elements...But in the case mentioned by steveax, the 'text-decoration' style refers the default value of 'a' tag only.. See the demo here... that property works for the h2 tag too.. So the solution is to style the 'a' tag only... –  Ayyappan Sekar Nov 28 '12 at 4:56
    
Interesting fiddle. It does show that the text-decoration: underline property is coming from somewhere other than the property on the h2 –  steveax Nov 28 '12 at 5:08

you need to put the text-decoration: none on the a link to remove the underline

fiddle

i think the underline is still there because the element is inside the a link or a tag the browser recognized it as a link, but has no text-decoration on the element itself..

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1  
Yep, I said in my question that was a solution to not having an underline, but that's not my question. –  steveax Nov 28 '12 at 4:25
    
-1 OP specifically stated in the question that he's aware of that. The question was why. –  Joseph Silber Nov 28 '12 at 4:27

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