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I am having some strange compiler errors that I cannot seem to understand. Below is the relevant code:

class A {

  var x = List[B]()

  def func = {
    val temp = x(0)
    x = x tail
    temp
  }

}

I simply want to remove the first element from a list and return it. However, I am getting an error saying "type mismatch: found B: required Int". I cannot figure out for the life of me why it wants an Int.

Thanks in advance for any help!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What is the type B? Did you mean Int?

To get the first element you can use head. To get the rest of the list you can use tail. The dot operator in Scala is optional.

  def func = {  
    val temp = x.head
    x = x.tail
    temp
  }
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Yeah, so for some reason, when I do x head, I get "Value update is not a member of B". And no, I want to return type B (a custom case class), but it wants an Int for some reason. –  Jin Nov 28 '12 at 5:30
    
Never mind, I didn't know I needed the . for x.head. Now I have the same error with typechecker.. –  Jin Nov 28 '12 at 5:31
    
x.head, x head, and x(0) all return the first element of the list x. x head is syntactic sugar for x.head. –  Brian Nov 28 '12 at 5:33
1  
The syntax without dots was introduced to support infix application like myList contains "foo", and works well for this. If in doubt, just write the dots. –  Landei Nov 28 '12 at 7:36
2  
Don't use postfix method syntax. The compiler thinks you mean x = x tail temp. A semicolon after tail should work as well but best to use a dot. mobile.twitter.com/odersky/status/49882758968905728 –  Luigi Plinge Nov 28 '12 at 16:09
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