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I'm currently working on speeding up the Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 performance. When analysing queries the Microsoft Database Engine Tuning Tool comes up to create an index with this query:

CREATE NONCLUSTERED INDEX [samplelocation1] ON [dbo].[sample_location]  
(
    [sample_id] ASC,
    [sample_code] ASC
) WITH (SORT_IN_TEMPDB = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF, DROP_EXISTING = OFF, ONLINE = OFF) ON [PRIMARY]

This takes down the execution time of the query on the testing server (which runs the same version of SQL server, 2008 R2) using a database restored from a backup from 17 to 5 seconds.

On the production server however, execution time goes up from 17 seconds to 1 minute 40 seconds. What's going on?

The query:

select * 
from sample_view  
where version_date >= '<date>' 
  and version_date - 0.9999999 <= '<date>' 
  and (cus_id in (select company_id 
                  from company_emp_relation_view 
                  where user_id = '<userid>') 
       or 
       fac_id in (select company_id 
                  from company_emp_relation_view 
                  where user_id = '<userid>'))  
  and sample_code in (select min(sample_code)  
                      from sample_location 
                      group by sample_id) 
  and (rfq_status<>'I') 
  and location <> 'D'  
order by 
  version_date desc

The query wasn't written by me, and looks overly complex but I'd like to solve this without changing any queries. My biggest surprise is that the effect of the index is not the same across systems.

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2  
Well, the amount and distribution of the data on your test vs. your production system might be totally different - and thus, anything you determine on the test system with a few hundred rows might NOT be working the same way on the production system with hundreds of thousands of rows ..... –  marc_s Nov 28 '12 at 5:38
2  
spot on marc - you can't do it like that unless test is a very recent copy of production. Also, the DTA is good, but it doesn't always get it right, especially if you gather for too short a period. –  Mitch Wheat Nov 28 '12 at 5:41

2 Answers 2

Well, the amount and distribution of the data on your test vs. your production system might be totally different - and thus, anything you determine on the test system with a few hundred rows might NOT be working the same way on the production system with hundreds of thousands of rows ..

The amount and distribution of data is a key factor in how the query optimizer decides whether or not to use an index (or just do a table scan instead). So any performance tuning must be performed on the actual data (or a copy thereof) - not on a "dummy" dev or test system with only a fraction of the data...

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+1. although I think this really belongs on dba.stackexchange.com –  Mitch Wheat Nov 28 '12 at 5:53
    
Hi, the test system uses a backup which is about a week old, and should be representative. Also it's strange I think that the predicted improvement of 65% is not met, as it slows down so much... @ Mitch: Yes you're right. My bad... –  Steven H Nov 28 '12 at 6:07
    
@StevenH: and is the hardware used (server, RAM, CPU) comparable between TEST and PROD, too? –  marc_s Nov 28 '12 at 6:08
    
@ Marc_S: No, the test hardware is expected to be a bit quicker, but still seeing some improvement would be expected (by me) in this situation –  Steven H Nov 28 '12 at 6:32
    
@StevenH: could you please run the query both on the test and prod server and get the actual execution plan, and post them here? (edit/update your question) –  marc_s Nov 28 '12 at 6:33

u may use profiler and DTA , it will give recomendations to include indexes on it.

coming to your problem first check the columns version_date , user_id 's having indexes are not. if alredy indexes are there then u have to identify the fragmentaion level of indexes. if fragmentation is in between 5 to 30% then u have to reorganize the index , if fragmentaion is more than 30% then u have to rebuild the indexes.

checking fragmentaion go to required table and goto indexes --> rc on ur index name--> properties--> fragmentaion

if ur table or view doen't contain any indexes try to create one clustered index and then nonclustered index.

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Hi, thanks for your answer. The Primary key index was really fragmented so I rebuilt it. No change unfortunately. There are no other indexes in this table, which is why I want to add one. Adding the one using the query in my opening post still slows down the query though from 17 seconds to 1 minute 40 something. This is the index suggested by DTA. –  Steven H Nov 28 '12 at 6:15

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