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When trying to add log4j logger to a Generic class, it does not generate logs. This is the code used.

public class GenericClass<K extends Serializable, V extends Serializable> extends ... {
      public static Logger log = Logger.getLogger(GenericClass.class.getName());

I am guessing the reason this code fails is because the class is not instantiated till runtime and the plain name that i have given no more resolves to the newly generated class.

Is there a way that generic classes can be logged at all?

share|improve this question
    
Is there some relevant configuration (like a log4j.properties or logback.xml or something) that you can post to give us more information? – Chris Martin Nov 28 '12 at 7:30
    
Why are you using getLogger(GenericClass.class.getName()) instead of getLogger(GenericClass.class)? – Chris Martin Nov 28 '12 at 7:32
    
@ChristopherMartin my bad, every thing works fine. for some reason i freaked out. had put in wrong ear files on the server. sorry :-(. the getName() thing is just old habbit. – mohit052 Nov 28 '12 at 7:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Generics have nothing to do with this.

At runtime, a logger by the name of x.y.z.GenericClass (x.y.z being the package in which GenericClass is located). If nothing is logged, then it's either because your application isn't logging anything, or your Log4J configuration is faulty.

To decide which one is true, add -Dlog4j.debug=true to your server initialization parameters and give it a try.

share|improve this answer
    
my bad, every thing works fine. for some reason i freaked out. had put in wrong ear files on the server. sorry :-( – mohit052 Nov 28 '12 at 7:50

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