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I understand that I can call ToString().IndexOf(...), but I don't want to create an extra string. I understand that I can write a search routine manually. I just wonder why such a routine doesn't already exist in the framework.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, many of the methods implemented for String could have been implemented for StringBuilder but that was not done. Consider using extension methods to add what you care about.

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I know this is an old question, however I have written a extension method that performs an IndexOf on a StringBuilder. It is below. I hope it helps anyone that finds this question, either from a Google search or searching StackOverflow.

/// <summary>
/// Returns the index of the start of the contents in a StringBuilder
/// </summary>        
/// <param name="value">The string to find</param>
/// <param name="startIndex">The starting index.</param>
/// <param name="ignoreCase">if set to <c>true</c> it will ignore case</param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static int IndexOf(this StringBuilder sb, string value, int startIndex, bool ignoreCase)
{            
    int index;
    int length = value.Length;
    int maxSearchLength = (sb.Length - length) + 1;

    if (ignoreCase)
    {
        for (int i = startIndex; i < maxSearchLength; ++i)
        {
            if (Char.ToLower(sb[i]) == Char.ToLower(value[0]))
            {
                index = 1;
                while ((index < length) && (Char.ToLower(sb[i + index]) == Char.ToLower(value[index])))
                    ++index;

                if (index == length)
                    return i;
            }
        }

        return -1;
    }

    for (int i = startIndex; i < maxSearchLength; ++i)
    {
        if (sb[i] == value[0])
        {
            index = 1;
            while ((index < length) && (sb[i + index] == value[index]))
                ++index;

            if (index == length)
                return i;
        }
    }

    return -1;
}
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Calling ToString() on a StringBuilder doesn't create an extra object, confusingly. Internally, StringBuilder stores a String object, for performance; calling ToString() simply returns that object.

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this is not correct in the context of the question if the stringbuilder is asked to modify itself Tthen a new string is created, the mutability of the internal buffer is not exposed to managed code. –  ShuggyCoUk Sep 1 '09 at 0:04
    
@ ShuggyCoUk: my comment was a little glib. I've removed it. –  Michael Petrotta Sep 1 '09 at 0:11
5  
To clarify the previous comment, there is not much overhead from calling ToString. But after you call it, the next modification to the StringBuilder will incur copying overhead. (This is a valid optimzation because ToString is usually the last thing done to a StringBuilder.) As a result of this, efficient implementations of String-like methods can't use ToString, which precludes a trivial solution to the original poster's issue. –  Jason Kresowaty Sep 1 '09 at 2:10
    
@binarycoder: Is that optimization still performed? I thought StringBuilder.ToString was changed to produce a new String object unless it can reuse a string that has already been returned, to avoid the possibility of one thread calling ToString while another thread is mutating the StringBuilder. While there's no spec as to what string should be returned in that case, there shouldn't be any way by which the string which is returned can be modified after the return; the only way I know to ensure that is to return a string which has never and will never be open to modification. –  supercat Nov 20 '12 at 22:12
1  
This answer is misleading as it suggests that the ToString method simply returns an already available string. That is not the case. There is some weird code using wstrcpy(looked at the decompiled code in ILSpy, .NET4) to create a new string from this stringbuilder. –  Tim Schmelter May 13 at 9:05

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