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Consider the following example of using jQuery's (v1.8.3) ajax() method while attempting to supply a context.

for(var i=0; i<3; i++) {
  $.ajax({
    url: "foo",
    context: i,
    success: function() { console.log(this); }
}

Expected output would be 3 Number objects, representing 0, 1 and 2 (not necessarily in that order.) In fact, the output to console is 2 Number objects, and 1 Object object, containing ajax request data.

> Number
> Object {url: "foo", isLocal: false, global: true, type: "GET", contentType: "application/x-www-form-urlencoded; charset=UTF-8"…}
> Number

Why do I not receive 3 Number objects?

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3 Answers 3

it tries to bind the success callback with the context ( and converts it as a object) .

So, if you provide a number, then it will bind it like:

 var a=12;
 var test = function(){ console.log(this.valueOf())}.bind(a)
 test();

you can use Ian's technique for "+this" instead of "this.valueOf()", just that this will also work with strings.

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Well, a is always an object, so it doesn't to convert it. I still don't think it's natural behaviour. Thanks for the input though +1. –  Aesthete Nov 29 '12 at 23:19
up vote 2 down vote accepted

After a bit of digging in the jQuery v1.8.3 source, I found this:

7645 | // Create the final options object
7646 | s = jQuery.ajaxSetup( {}, options ),
7647 | // Callbacks context
7648 | callbackContext = s.context || s,

This means whenever the context option of an ajax() call is falsy, the value assigned to the callback as the this context parameter is an object returned by jQuery.ajaxSetup().

Be aware that passing any falsy value as a context option will result in this behaviour, including 0, null and "".

I beleive a small change could remove this ambiguity, and I would lodge a ticket with the jQuery development team, however I don't know if they'll appreciate a backwards incompatible change that breaks half the internet :(

callbackContext = s.context !== undefined ? s.context : s
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That's a great find, but it doesn't explain why 0 and 2 work in this situation but 1 doesn't... –  Ian Nov 28 '12 at 7:06
1  
Nevermind, the OP pointed out that the order received may not be the order executed...which is true, but I wouldn't have expected that with such a simple example. –  Ian Nov 28 '12 at 7:09

Does it help if you try something like this?:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    (function () {
        $.ajax({
            url: "foo",
            context: i,
            success: function () {
                console.log(this);
            }
        });
    })(i);
}

But going off of what Aesthete discovered, maybe you could convert to a string when defining the context, but then convert back to an integer inside of success...something like:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++) {
    $.ajax({
        url: "foo",
        context: ""+i,
        success: function () {
            console.log(+this);
        }
    });
}

But of course, this only really applies to your code because you're using integers like this. It might not be as easy if you were passing other falsey values.

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+1 because this is how I got around the issue. I still believe that if you pass a context argument, it should be received, and the fallback should only occur when context is undefined (not supplied). –  Aesthete Nov 28 '12 at 8:21
    
@Aesthete Oh I definitely agree...I'm not sure why it is the way it is now. I would think they would have the modification you posted (even use typeof s.context !== "undefined" instead of !== undefined), so I wonder why not. –  Ian Nov 28 '12 at 8:25
    
It might be an oversight from yester-year. It's probably too late to change that sort of behaviour now. –  Aesthete Nov 28 '12 at 8:29

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