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Can anyone point me to a good tutorial on / explain the basics of writing functions in assembly and then linking them into a c++ program?

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inline assembly... codeproject.com/Articles/15971/Using-Inline-Assembly-in-C-C –  neagoegab Nov 28 '12 at 7:48
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@neagoegab Inline assembly is something else. It doesn't involve somehow telling the assembler that a certain point should be exported as a function entry point, or writing a c++ function prototype for an assembly function, or assembling into a format usable by the linker, or worrying about calling conventions, or... –  baruch Nov 28 '12 at 7:52
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4 Answers

  1. Add .asm files to a project and implement the required functionality inside them. When compiled, you'll get a standard .obj file corresponding to the assembly source file.
  2. Declare your functions as extrn in the assembly source code to allow calling them from other linkage units.
  3. In your C++ code declare the external asm funcs as extern and with C linkage (extern "C") - this is the assembly convention of calling and you must comply.
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Also be careful with the calling conventions - best to specify those explicitly in this case I think. –  Voo Nov 28 '12 at 8:44
    
@Voo it's in the answer (par. 3) –  icepack Nov 28 '12 at 8:45
    
I don't mean C linkage, but the actual calling convention, e.g. stdcall, when defining the function. –  Voo Nov 28 '12 at 17:14
    
In assembly source code? –  icepack Nov 28 '12 at 19:01
    
Well if you pass arguments into the asm functions you'll still have to follow the right calling convention and there's no compiler that actually makes sure that its implicit default matches the one you implemented by hand. –  Voo Nov 28 '12 at 23:56
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Check this one, it should be helpful

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I saw that. It is about writing whole assembly programs in Visual Studio, not about writing just a function and calling it from c/c++ –  baruch Nov 28 '12 at 7:48
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You can use inline ASM, but may not support some instruction. But enough at all., As you know, some CRT function is implemented by inline ASM.

__asm
{
    emit ...
    ...
}
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I know about inline ASM. That is not what I need, since it doesn't support x64 assembly. –  baruch Nov 28 '12 at 8:09
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