Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have regex as follows:

     /^(\d|-|\(|\)|\+|\s){12,}$/

This will allow digits, (, ), space. But I want to ensure string contains atleast 8 digits. Some allowed strings are as follows:

      (1323  ++24)233
      24243434 43
      ++++43435++4554345  434

It should not allow strings like:

     ((((((1213)))
     ++++232+++
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Use Look ahead within your regex at the start..

/^(?=(.*\d){8,})[\d\(\)\s+-]{8,}$/
  ---------------
          |
          |->this would check for 8 or more digits

(?=(.*\d){8,}) is zero width look ahead that checks for 0 to many character (i.e .*) followed by a digit (i.e \d) 8 to many times (i.e.{8,0})

(?=) is called zero width because it doesnt consume the characters..it just checks


To restict it to 14 digits you can do

/^(?=([^\d]*\d){8,14}[^\d]*$)[\d\(\)\s+-]{8,}$/

try it here

share|improve this answer
1  
Haha, first Some1.Kill.The.DJ beats me to the answer, then @JanDvorak beats me to the comment. :D So this is what I got: ^(?=(?:.*\d){8})(?:\d|-|\(|\)|\+|\s){12} –  Amadan Nov 28 '12 at 8:00
    
@Amadan all your vital info's make me understand regex more..thanks.. –  Anirudha Nov 28 '12 at 8:01
    
@Amadan you can't stop matching the main regex when you collect enough data. There might be undesired characters in the string. –  Jan Dvorak Nov 28 '12 at 8:02
    
Also, I suggest you use rubular.com for Ruby queries - Ruby's regular expressions are quite a bit more powerful than JavaScript's, modifiers are different, and if that's not reason enough, Rubular has a quite nice interface. –  Amadan Nov 28 '12 at 8:02
1  
You can clean up the main part to: [\d\s\(\)+-]{12,} –  pguardiario Nov 28 '12 at 8:07
show 13 more comments

Here's a non regular expression solution

numbers = ["(1323  ++24)233", "24243434 43" , "++++43435++4554345  434", "123 456_7"]

numbers.each do |number|
  count = 0
  number.each_char do |char| 
    count += 1 if char.to_i.to_s == char
    break if count > 7
  end
  puts "#{count > 7}"
end
share|improve this answer
    
What about non-allowed characters ? –  oldergod Nov 28 '12 at 8:51
    
He mentions ´[(),\s]´ in the question but the example strings also contains ´[\+]´. The definition seems unclear. –  Jonas Elfström Nov 28 '12 at 9:26
add comment

No need to mention ^, $, or the "or more" part of {8,}, or {12,}, which is unclear where it comes from.

The following makes the intention transparent.

r = /
  (?=(?:.*\d){8})    # First condition: Eight digits
  (?!.*[^-\d()+\s])  # Second condition: Characters other than `[-\d()+\s]` should not be included.
/x

resulting in:

"(1323  ++24)233" =~ r #=> 0
"24243434 43" =~ r #=> 0
"++++43435++4554345  434" =~ r #=> 0
"((((((1213)))" =~ r #=> nil
"++++232+++" =~ r #=> nil
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.