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i want to access the bytes of an object in C# okey for example :

Serializing an class in WCF the serializer read the all bytes of class object and Finally SOAP message !

Some Thing Like This You Know A Way To Read object Bytes And Recreate object by its Bytes

//x_obj created and we allocate an address & size of RAM (memory) to it Now its byts structure is in the RAM

X_calss x_obj = new X_class(); 

//and now we want to read the x_obj bytes in RAM
unsafe byte[] READ(X_class x_obj){
 xobj_pointer = &x_obj;//pointer to address of obj in RAM
 byte[] xobj_bytes = read_from(xobj_pointer,sizeof(x_obj));//Some Way To Read Byte of x_obj
 return xobj_bytes;
}
// and now we want to recreate class by it bytes stream
unsafe X_class Creative(byte[] xobj_bytes){
 x_pointer = Memory_allocate(sizeof(X_class));//reserve an address of RAM
 write_to(x_pointer,xobj_bytes);//write bytes to RAM 
 X_class x_obj = (X_class)*(x_pointer);//recreate the class by content of pointer
 return x_obj;
}
share|improve this question
2  
does the class you want to do this with have the Serializable attribute? –  DarkSquirrel42 Nov 28 '12 at 9:26
    
yes it dose . if it dose not what? –  patachi Nov 28 '12 at 9:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While agreeing with both Jon Skeet and ValtasarIII, getting access to the raw bytes of a variable is possible (in a horrible kind of way) if your data types are structs (with known layouts), contain only value types and you're allowing unsafe code.

What follows is certainly not a technique that you'd want to use to cross machine boundaries (nor should it really be used at all).

Given a structure called TestStruct defined like so

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
public struct TestStruct
{
    public int A;
    public int B;
}

The raw bytes of its contents may be obtained like this

private static unsafe byte[] GetBytes(TestStruct item)
{
    //Figure out how big TestStruct is
    var size = Marshal.SizeOf(item);
    //Make an array large enough to hold all the bytes required
    var array = new byte[size];
    //Get a pointer to the struct
    var itemPtr = &item;
    //Change the type of the pointer from TestStruct* to byte*
    var itemBytes = (byte*) itemPtr;

    //Iterate from the first byte in the data to the last, copying the values into our
    //    temporary storage
    for (var i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    {
        array[i] = itemBytes[i];
    }

    //Return the bytes that were found in the instance of TestStruct
    return array;
}

And we can build a new one like this

private static unsafe TestStruct Reconstitute(IList<byte> data)
{
    //Figure out how big TestStruct is
    var size = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(TestStruct));

    //If the data we've been presented with is either too large or too small to contain
    //    the data for exactly one TestStruct instance, throw an exception
    if (data.Count != size)
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException("Amount of data available is not the exact amount of data required to reconstitute the item");
    }

    //Make our temporary instance
    var item = new TestStruct();
    //Get a pointer to our temporary instance
    var itemPtr = &item;
    //Change the type of the pointer to byte*
    var itemBytes = (byte*) itemPtr;

    //Iterate from the first byte in the data to the last, copying the values into our
    //    temporary instance
    for (var i = 0; i < size; ++i)
    {
        itemBytes[i] = data[i];
    }

    //Return our reconstituted structure
    return item;
}

Usage:

static void Main()
{
    var test = new TestStruct
    {
        A = 1,
        B = 3
    };

    var bytes = GetBytes(test);
    var duplicate = Reconstitute(bytes);

    Console.WriteLine("Original");
    PrintObject(test, 1);

    Console.WriteLine();
    Console.WriteLine("Reconstituted");
    PrintObject(duplicate, 1);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

And, for completeness, the code for PrintObject

static void PrintObject(object instance, int initialIndentLevel)
{
    PrintObject(instance, initialIndentLevel, 4, ' ', new List<object>());
}

static void PrintObject(object instance, int level, int indentCount, char paddingChar, ICollection<object> printedObjects)
{
    if (printedObjects.Contains(instance))
    {
        return;
    }

    var tabs = "".PadLeft(level * indentCount, paddingChar);
    var instanceType = instance.GetType();
    printedObjects.Add(instance);

    foreach (var member in instanceType.GetMembers())
    {
        object value;
        try
        {
            switch (member.MemberType)
            {
                case MemberTypes.Property:
                    var property = (PropertyInfo) member;
                    value = property.GetValue(instance, null);
                    break;
                case MemberTypes.Field:
                    var field = (FieldInfo) member;
                    value = field.GetValue(instance);
                    break;
                default:
                    continue;
            }
        }
        catch
        {
            continue;
        }

        if (value == null || value.GetType().IsValueType || value.GetType().ToString() != value.ToString())
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{2}{0}: {1}", member.Name, (value ?? "(null)"), tabs);

        }
        else
        {
            var vals = value as IEnumerable;

            if (vals != null)
            {
                var index = 0;
                var indented = "".PadLeft((level + 1) * indentCount, paddingChar);
                Console.WriteLine("{2}{0}: {1}", member.Name, value, tabs);

                foreach (var val in vals)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("{1}[{0}]:", index++, indented);
                    PrintObject(val, level + 2, indentCount, paddingChar, printedObjects);
                }

                if (index == 0)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("{0}(No elements)", indented);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                PrintObject(value, level + 1, indentCount, paddingChar, printedObjects);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
WOW, tnx ! '[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]' i wonder It Cuse Problem If Our variable length is not fixed like an list<Xclass> –  patachi Nov 28 '12 at 11:42
    
If Xclass were really a struct you could take the whole byte buffer you receive, divide it by the size of the type (obtained with Marshal.SizeOf(Type)) and create instances from each block of the data, adding each instance to the target list as it gets created. –  mlorbetske Nov 28 '12 at 11:46

i want to access the bytes of an object in C# okey for example

You absolutely don't. Two reasons just to start with:

  • The object layout may well be different on the server and the client, particularly if one is using a 64-bit CLR and the other is using a 32-bit CLR
  • Objects contain process-specific data such as syncblocks, which you can't sensibly propagate
  • Any references on the "source" machine probably won't be valid on the "target" machine

Consider the bytes involved in this simple class:

class Foo
{
    string name;
}

The "bytes" of the data here just consist of a reference. For the purposes of this question, let's imagine that a reference is actually a simple pointer. A pointer to memory address 0x12345678 is very unlikely to refer to a string with the same contents when you've copied that address over to another process.

This kind of thing is precisely why we have serializers: taking a copy of the memory itself simply isn't good enough.

share|improve this answer
    
What if the class consists only of primitive value type members? It might be stupid to copy an object this way, but is something like that possible in C#? –  Abbondanza Nov 28 '12 at 9:32
    
yes it is . But It Return A dump Of memory i need Some Lower Level Access. Any Way Thank You ,i Try To Decompile Serialization Assembly :d –  patachi Nov 28 '12 at 10:14

C# is not equivalent to C in terms of operating with memory.

1.Mark the class of the object with Serializable attribute.

2.Serialize to bytes:


public byte[] ObjectToByteArray(Object obj)
{
    BinaryFormatter bf = new BinaryFormatter();
    MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
    bf.Serialize(ms, obj);
    return ms.ToArray();
}

3.Deserialize to object:


public object BytesToObject(byte[] bytes)
{
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(bytes);
        BinaryFormatter bf= new BinaryFormatter();
        ms.Position = 0;
        return bf.Deserialize(ms);
}

share|improve this answer
    
thank you a lot :D –  patachi Nov 28 '12 at 10:20

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