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This SQL fiddle illustrates the problem I'm having.

As a background: I've got Jobs, Elements, Role-hours and Rates. A Job can consist of several Elements. An Element (usually) consists of one or more Role-hours (that is, a Role and a number of hours). Each Role has an hourly Rate, which varies according to the date, and according to the client for the Job.

In the query above, I'm trying to get a financial breakdown for a Job: a list of all the elements for the job, with their total cost. In fact, at the moment, it's breaking those elements down by role too, but that isn't necessarily required for the final query.

You can see that the "role cost" column correctly multiplies the hourly rate by the budgeted hours to reach a subtotal for that Role. However, when I try to SUM those fields (in the "element subtotal" column), I'm getting... well, it's not the number I was expecting.

I suspect that the issue is with my subquery that gets the latest rates, which I've set up for reference as a separate SQL Fiddle here. It's returning more than one possible rate for a role: when this gets joined back into the main query, it's therefore SUMming too many rows.

The problem that's therefore twisting my melon is this: I need to match the "best" rate for a given client. That is, if there's a rate that matches both the company ID and the client ID, I want that one. But if there's not, I just want the one that matches the company ID. And if there's not one of those, I just want the "base" rate for the role. Hence all the "OR __ IS NULL" in my joins.

What I don't know how to do is combine that, with the "just return one record" I need to make the SUM() part work.

Apologies for the long post. If you've got this far, thank you.

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So far as I can see, there are 4 possible outcomes when comparing each of the three client_* columns from the rates table with those from the jobs table: they either match, do not match, one side is NULL or the other side is NULL. Across the three columns, that's 64 possible outcomes. You are attempting to express an ordering over those 64 possible outcomes, with the rates.date_from column somehow being used to break ties. However, it's a little unclear to me exactly what that ordering should be: your penultimate paragraph appears to be inconsistent with your query. Please clarify. –  eggyal Nov 28 '12 at 11:20
    
I guess the inconsistency is because the subquery doesn't do what I want it to :) It should ideally match a single record from the rates table, but exactly which one depends on what matches it finds. The 'priority' for matching rates to the job should be: (1) Same company, group and client (2) Same company and group (null client) (2) Same company (null group and client) The client-matching should always take precedence over the date. So an older record that matched on all three columns should be preferred to a newer one that just matched, say, the company. –  Wintermute Nov 28 '12 at 12:13

1 Answer 1

One way would involve a correlated subquery:

SELECT   e.id AS element_id,
         h.role,
         SUM(h.hours_budgeted) AS total_hours_budgeted,
         r.hourly_rate,
         e.pm_amount,
         e.revenue AS fixed_revenue,
         e.revenue_extra,
         SUM(h.hours_budgeted) * r.hourly_rate AS element_subtotal
FROM     job                    j
    JOIN job_element            e ON e.job     = j.id
    JOIN job_element_role_hours h ON h.element = e.id
    JOIN rate                   r ON r.id      = (
           SELECT   id
           FROM     rate
           WHERE    rate.role = h.role
                AND IFNULL(rate.client_company = j.client_company, TRUE)
                AND IFNULL(rate.client_group   = j.client_group  , TRUE)
                AND IFNULL(rate.client_contact = j.client_contact, TRUE)
           ORDER BY rate.client_company DESC,
                    rate.client_group   DESC,
                    rate.client_contact DESC,
                    rate.date_from      DESC
           LIMIT    1
         )
WHERE    j.id = 1
GROUP BY e.id, h.role

See it on sqlfiddle.

However, correlated subqueries are inefficient and likely to be slow. As the manual says:

Rewriting the query as a join might improve performance.

To do that, one would have to obtain the groupwise maximum:

SELECT   e.id AS element_id,
         h.role,
         SUM(h.hours_budgeted) AS total_hours_budgeted,
         r.hourly_rate,
         e.pm_amount,
         e.revenue AS fixed_revenue,
         e.revenue_extra,
         SUM(h.hours_budgeted) * r.hourly_rate AS element_subtotal
FROM     job                    j
    JOIN job_element            e ON e.job     = j.id
    JOIN job_element_role_hours h ON h.element = e.id
    JOIN rate                   r ON r.role    = h.role
           AND IFNULL(r.client_company = j.client_company, TRUE)
           AND IFNULL(r.client_group   = j.client_group  , TRUE)
           AND IFNULL(r.client_contact = j.client_contact, TRUE)
    JOIN (
      SELECT   j.client_company, j.client_group, j.client_contact, r.role,
               MAX(
                 IF(r.client_company <=> j.client_company, 1<<34, 0)
               | IF(r.client_group   <=> j.client_group  , 1<<33, 0)
               | IF(r.client_contact <=> j.client_contact, 1<<32, 0)
               | UNIX_TIMESTAMP(r.date_from)
               ) AS relevance
      FROM     rate r JOIN job j ON
                     IFNULL(r.client_company = j.client_company, TRUE)
                 AND IFNULL(r.client_group   = j.client_group  , TRUE)
                 AND IFNULL(r.client_contact = j.client_contact, TRUE)
      GROUP BY j.client_company, j.client_group, j.client_contact, r.role
    ) t     ON t.role = r.role
           AND t.client_company = j.client_company
           AND t.client_group   = j.client_group
           AND t.client_contact = j.client_contact
           AND t.relevance  = IF(r.client_company <=> j.client_company, 1<<34, 0)
                            | IF(r.client_group   <=> j.client_group  , 1<<33, 0)
                            | IF(r.client_contact <=> j.client_contact, 1<<32, 0)
                            | UNIX_TIMESTAMP(r.date_from)
WHERE    j.id = 1
GROUP BY e.id, h.role

See it on sqlfiddle.

Here I find the groupwise maximum in a similar vain to your attempt, by calculating a relevance score. However, I go via some bit twiddling, where 234 indicates whether there is a match on client_company, 233 on client_group and 232 on client_contact, with the 32 lowest-order bits representing the rate's date_from—then taking the maximum relevance score will yield the score of the best match, and joining to the rate table again enables one to obtain the hourly_rate as desired.

One could even improve this further, to avoid calculating a relevance score, by nesting to find the groupwise maximum on each column in order; however, it's probably not worth going down that path unless you're left with performance problems that cannot be resolved in any other way. You can see the technique in my answer to another question.

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