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For some reason the String[] champs isn't being instantiated and I can't seem to see why
Shouldn't champs = new String[]{ "BLAH", "BLAH", "BLAH"}; initialize the array?

  public static String[] getChamps() {

    String rolereturn = ChampSelect.getRoles();

    //Switch to Determine Champion Suggestions


    String[] champs; //String Declaration

    switch (rolereturn) {

        case "AD Carry": //AD Carry Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Ashe", "Caityln", "Draven", "Ezreal", "Kog'Maw", "Sivir", "Twitch", "Varus", "Vayne" };
            break;

        case "AP Carry": //AP Carry Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Diana", "Evelyn", "Kassadin", "Kennen" };
            break;

        case "Support": //Support Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Janna", "Nunu", "Shen", "Soraka", "Taric", };
            break;

        case "AP Jungle": //AP Jungle Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Diana", "Fiddlesticks" };
            break;

        case "AD Jungle": //AD Jungle Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Kha'Zix", "Nocturne", "Rengar", "Udyr", "Warwick", };
            break;

        case "AP Top": //AP Top Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Akali", "Cho'Gath", "Kennen", "Malphite", "Shen", "Singed", "Teemo" };
            break;

        case "AD Top": //AD Top Selection Options
            champs = new String[]{ "Fiora", "Irelia", "Jax", "Kha'Zix", "Master Yi", "Nasus", "Nidalee", "Rengar", "Zed" };
            break;
    }
    return champs;
}
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2  
Did you try to run this method with the debugger to check if one of the case statements is executed? by the way: When you have a switch statement, you should always have a default case which does something meaningful or throws an exception. –  Philipp Nov 28 '12 at 9:56
1  
Although yours SHOULD WORK, You may also remove this [] from champs = new String[]. Just try using String[] champs = {"x", "y", "z"}.... +1 @Philipp –  bonCodigo Nov 28 '12 at 9:56
    
@bonCodigo if you do this inside each case the array wouldn't be accessible after the switch anymore. –  jlordo Nov 28 '12 at 10:02

3 Answers 3

You are correct it would initialise the array if one of the case statements were called. I would add a default in there and then throw if that default is called. The default is called when no case statement is matched. It looks like you are covering all case statements so have a default throw would be a good idea.

Something like this should do it

 default: throw new RuntimeException("SHould not be here " + rolereturn);
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Thank you this was exactly it, I haven't used switch statements before and did not think to put a default in, now to finish the rest! –  Sean Patrick Dill Nov 28 '12 at 10:02
    
@SeanPatrickDill which is a good thing, nobody should use switch statements, ever, see my answer for a cleaner solution. –  akuhn Nov 28 '12 at 10:24

The most likely cause is a problem with rolereturns not being what you think. Could you try and add a default at the end of your switch, set the array to something, and see if that does it?

Otherwise simply debug and check that you go into the right lines...

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I'd use a Map rather than a switch case,

public static String[] getChamps() {

    Map<String,String[]> map = new HashMap();
    map.put("AD Carry",new String[]{ "Ashe", "Caityln", "Draven", "Ezreal", "Kog'Maw", "Sivir", "Twitch", "Varus", "Vayne" });
    // ... and so on for all your cases

    String rolereturn = ChampSelect.getRoles();
    if (!map.containsKey(rolereturn)) throw new IllegalArgumentException(rolereturn);

    return map.get()    
}
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