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Does Windows XP (and up) store how long it has been...

  • ...since the system booted?
  • ...running since install?
  • ...in hours/minutes since current used logged on?
  • ...in total hours the user has been logged on?

Thanks.

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I edited the question to more clearly list the different things the OP is asking for. I hope I got everything correct. –  jeffamaphone Sep 1 '09 at 3:49
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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use the LsaGetLogonSessionData to get the data about a particular logon session, including the time the session was started. To call that method you need a LUID - a logon session ID. You can get the list of current logon sessions LUIDs using LsaEnumerateLogonSessions.

If you are looking for the data for a particular user, you can look at the UserName member of the SECURITY_LOGON_SESSION_DATA structure returned by LsaGetLogonSessionData.

Edit: To get the time since the system was started, use GetTickCount64(), as @jeffamaphone mentioned.

The others you can calculated from the difference between the SECURITY_LOGON_SESSION_DATA.LogonTime and the current time.

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On the terminal run systeminfo

Example:

C:\WINDOWS>systeminfo

Host Name:                 ...
OS Name:                   Microsoft Windows XP Professional
OS Version:                5.1.2600 Service Pack 2 Build 2600
OS Manufacturer:           Microsoft Corporation
OS Configuration:          Member Workstation
OS Build Type:             Multiprocessor Free
Registered Owner:          ...
Registered Organization:   ...
Product ID:                ...
Original Install Date:     17/04/2009, 10:23:23 AM
System Up Time:            0 Days, 0 Hours, 51 Minutes, 11 Seconds
System Manufacturer:       Dell Inc.
(etc...)

I believe there may be other ways also to find such info. For example, PCWizard shows some more detailed info about install date, boots since install, uptime, time since logon, etc.

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You can see when the system started by typing the following into a command prompt

net statistics workstation

You'll get output like this

Workstation Statistics for \\LAPTOP


Statistics since 8/31/2009 8:50:10 PM
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GetTickCount() does what you want, though it wraps-around every 49 days or so. So, yeah, use GetTickCount64().

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The only problem is that this one shows the time since the OS itself started, not since the user has logged in. –  Franci Penov Sep 1 '09 at 3:13
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psinfo from Sysinternals

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