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I've got AVX C++ code like this, that compiles fine under Visual Studio 2010:

#include <immintrin.h>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
    float data[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7};
    __m256 ymm0 = _mm256_loadu_ps(data);
    // ..
    float r0 = ymm0.m256_f32[0];
    float r4 = ymm0.m256_f32[4];
    std::cout << r0 << " " << r4 << std::endl;
}

GCC however, gives the following error:

foo.cpp:8:18: error: request for member ‘m256_f32’ in ‘ymm0’, which is of non-class type ‘__m256 {aka __vector(8) float}’
foo.cpp:9:18: error: request for member ‘m256_f32’ in ‘ymm0’, which is of non-class type ‘__m256 {aka __vector(8) float}’

I've done some research and it seems that ymm0.m256_f32 is a Microsoft specific instruction to extract the individual floats from a long AVX register. But what can I use for gcc/linux to do the same thing?

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Bare in mind that the lack of standardization on m256_f32 and family is to discourage its use because it is generally slow. The "correct" way to access individual elements is to use _mm256_extractf128_pd and such. –  Mysticial Nov 28 '12 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

GCC can index vectors in the C language, but not in C++. You may consider rewriting small parts of code as C.

The other option is to explicitly use shuffle, extract and conversion intrinsics - _mm256_shuffle_pd, _mm256_extractf128_pd, _mm_cvtsd_f64.

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Following @chill I came up with the following two solutions to this specific problem. The C++ solution:

#include <immintrin.h>
#include <iostream>
int main() {
    float data[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7};
    __m256 ymm0 = _mm256_loadu_ps(data);
    // ..
    __m128 low = _mm256_extractf128_ps (ymm0, 0); // extracts lower half
    __m128 high = _mm256_extractf128_ps (ymm0, 1);// extracts upper half
    float r0 = _mm_cvtss_f32 (low);  // extracts lowest float
    float r4 = _mm_cvtss_f32 (high);  // extracts lowest float
    std::cout << r0 << " " << r4 << std::endl;
}

And the solution in plain C:

#include <immintrin.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    float data[] = {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7};
    __m256 ymm0 = _mm256_loadu_ps(data);
    // ..
    float r0 = ymm0[0];
    float r4 = ymm0[4];
    printf("%f, %f", r0, r4);
}
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