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It is discouraged to simply catch System.Exception. Instead, only the "known" exceptions should be caught.

Now, this sometimes leads to unneccessary repetitive code, for example:

try
{
    WebId = new Guid(queryString["web"]);
}
catch (FormatException)
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}
catch (OverflowException)
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}

I wonder: Is there a way to catch both exceptions and only call the WebId = Guid.Empty call once?

The given example is rather simple, as it's only a GUID. But imagine code where you modify an object multiple times, and if one of the manipulations fail in an expected way, you want to "reset" the object. However, if there is an unexpected exception, I still want to throw that higher.

About the answer: Thanks everyone! For some reason, I had my mind set on a switch-case statement which does not support switching on GetType(). Now, there were two answers, one using "typeof" and one using "is". I first thought typeof() would be my function, because I thought "Hey, I only want to catch FormatException because that's the only thing I expect". But that's not how catch() works: catch also catches all derived exceptions. After thinking about it, this is really obvious: Otherwise, catch(Exception ex) would not work! So the correct answer is "is". Yay, learned two things with only one question \o/

share|improve this question
3  
If you are using .net 4 and above i prefer to use aggregateexception msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.aggregateexception.aspx – Bepenfriends Oct 18 '13 at 3:21
    
Bepenfriends- Since System.Guid does not throw AggregateException, it would be great if you (or someone) could post an answer showing how you would wrap it into an AggregateException etc.. – user704808 Jan 30 '14 at 18:53
    
On using AggregateException: Throwing an AggregateException in my own code – DavidRR Aug 14 '14 at 17:25
1  
"It is discouraged to simply catch System.Exception." -and if method can throw 32 types of exceptions, what one does? write catch for each of them separately? – Giorgi Moniava May 23 '15 at 20:22

21 Answers 21

up vote 1084 down vote accepted

Catch System.Exception and switch on the types

catch (Exception ex)            
{                
    if (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException)
    {
        WebId = Guid.Empty;
        return;
    }

    throw;
}

As several answers in this thread now say (upvote them as well), since C# 6 it is much better to use:

catch (Exception ex) when (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException)           
{                
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
    return;
}

The reason why it is better, is that we avoid the mild corruption of the stack trace introduced by throw; in the original (pre-C# 6) approach. This will really only catch the desired cases.

share|improve this answer
718  
throw ex is one if those really common mistakes. As a rule of thumb: You NEVER want to throw ex, since that generates a new exception, with an empty call stack. throw simply throws the existing exception higher. – Michael Stum May 5 '09 at 10:39
21  
Unfortunately, FxCop (ie - Visual Studio Code Analysis) doesn't like it when you catch Exception. – Andrew Garrison Aug 27 '10 at 19:48
14  
The latest version of FxCop does not throw an exception when the code above is used. – Peter Jul 8 '11 at 5:12
11  
Not sure what was wrong with the OP's code in the first place. The #1 accepted answer is almost twice as many lines and far less readable. – João Bragança Sep 4 '12 at 21:57
6  
@JoãoBragança: While this answer in this example uses more lines, try to imagine if you are dealing with file IO for example, and all you want to do is catch those exceptions and do some log messaging, but only those you expect coming from your file IO methods. Then you often have to deal with a larger number (about 5 or more) different types of exceptions. In that situation, this approach can save you some lines. – Xilconic Nov 28 '13 at 14:47

Not in C# unfortunately, as you'd need an exception filter to do it and C# doesn't expose that feature of MSIL. VB.NET does have this capability though, e.g.

Catch ex As Exception When TypeOf ex Is FormatException OrElse TypeOf ex Is OverflowException

What you could do is use an anonymous function to encapsulate your on-error code, and then call it in those specific catch blocks:

Action onError = () => WebId = Guid.Empty;
try
{
    // something
}
catch (FormatException)
{
    onError();
}
catch (OverflowException)
{
    onError();
}
share|improve this answer
17  
Interesting idea and another example that VB.net has some interesting advantages over C# sometimes – Michael Stum Sep 25 '08 at 21:19
22  
@MichaelStum with that kind of syntax I would hardly call it interesting at all... shudder – MDeSchaepmeester Oct 9 '14 at 12:15
11  
Exception filters are coming in c# 6! Note the difference of using filters in favor of rethrowing roslyn.codeplex.com/discussions/541301 – Arne Deruwe Nov 26 '14 at 13:26
    
@ArneDeruwe Thank you for that link! I just learned one more important reason not to re-throw: throw e; destroys stacktrace and callstack, throw; destroys "only" callstack (rendering crash-dumps useless!) A very good reason to use neither if it can be avoided! – AnorZaken Dec 11 '14 at 14:53
    
If I'm not mistake you can also drop through a catch in VB like you can with case or (switch in c#) statements like so Try Catch ex As ArgumentException Catch ex As NullReferenceException End Try But unfortunately C# does not so we're left with a helper method or to catch generically and determine type. – David Carrigan Sep 17 '15 at 16:13

I know I'm a little late to the party here, but holy smoke...

Cutting straight to the chase, this kind of duplicates an earlier answer, but if you really want to perform a common action for several exception types and keep the whole thing neat and tidy within the scope of the one method, why not just use a lambda/closure/inline function to do something like the following? I mean, chances are pretty good that you'll end up realizing that you just want to make that closure a separate method that you can utilize all over the place. But then it will be super easy to do that without actually changing the rest of the code structurally. Right?

private void TestMethod ()
{
    Action<Exception> errorHandler = ( ex ) => {
        // write to a log, whatever...
    };

    try
    {
        // try some stuff
    }
    catch ( FormatException  ex ) { errorHandler ( ex ); }
    catch ( OverflowException ex ) { errorHandler ( ex ); }
    catch ( ArgumentNullException ex ) { errorHandler ( ex ); }
}

I can't help but wonder (warning: a little irony/sarcasm ahead) why on earth go to all this effort to basically just replace the following:

try
{
    // try some stuff
}
catch( FormatException ex ){}
catch( OverflowException ex ){}
catch( ArgumentNullException ex ){}

...with some crazy variation of this next code smell, I mean example, only to pretend that you're saving a few keystrokes.

// sorta sucks, let's be honest...
try
{
    // try some stuff
}
catch( Exception ex )
{
    if (ex is FormatException ||
        ex is OverflowException ||
        ex is ArgumentNullException)
    {
        // write to a log, whatever...
        return;
    }
    throw;
}

Because it certainly isn't automatically more readable.

Granted, I left the three identical instances of /* write to a log, whatever... */ return; out of the first example.

But that's sort of my point. Y'all have heard of functions/methods, right? Seriously. Write a common ErrorHandler function and, like, call it from each catch block.

If you ask me, the second example (with the if and is keywords) is both significantly less readable, and simultaneously significantly more error-prone during the maintenance phase of your project.

The maintenance phase, for anyone who might be relatively new to programming, is going to comprise 98.7% or more of the overall lifetime of your project, and the poor schmuck doing the maintenance is almost certainly going to be someone other than you. And there is a very good chance they will spend 50% of their time on the job cursing your name.

And of course FxCop barks at you and so you have to also add an attribute to your code that has precisely zip to do with the running program, and is only there to tell FxCop to ignore an issue that in 99.9% of cases it is totally correct in flagging. And, sorry, I might be mistaken, but doesn't that "ignore" attribute end up actually compiled into your app?

Would putting the entire if test on one line make it more readable? I don't think so. I mean, I did have another programmer vehemently argue once long ago that putting more code on one line would make it "run faster." But of course he was stark raving nuts. Trying to explain to him (with a straight face--which was challenging) how the interpreter or compiler would break that long line apart into discrete one-instruction-per-line statements--essentially identical to the result if he had gone ahead and just made the code readable instead of trying to out-clever the compiler--had no effect on him whatsoever. But I digress.

How much less readable does this get when you add three more exception types, a month or two from now? (Answer: it gets a lot less readable).

One of the major points, really, is that most of the point of formatting the textual source code that we're all looking at every day is to make it really, really obvious to other human beings what is actually happening when the code runs. Because the compiler turns the source code into something totally different and couldn't care less about your code formatting style. So all-on-one-line totally sucks, too.

Just saying...

// super sucks...
catch( Exception ex )
{
    if ( ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException || ex is ArgumentNullException )
    {
        // write to a log, whatever...
        return;
    }
    throw;
}
share|improve this answer
6  
When I first stumbled across this question I was all over the accepted answer. Cool I can just catch all Exceptions and the check the type. I thought it cleaned up the code, but something kept me coming back to the question and I actually read the other answers to the question. I chewed on it for a while, but I have to agree with you. It is more readable and maintainable to use a function to dry up your code than to catch everything, check the type comparing against a list, wrapping code, and throwing. Thanks for coming late and providing an alternative and sane (IMO) option. +1. – erroric Mar 6 '14 at 14:55
3  
A convert!! :-) – Craig Mar 10 '14 at 14:00
3  
Using an error handling function wouldn't work if you wanted to include a throw;. You'd have to repeat that line of code in each catch block (obviously not the end of the world but worth mentioning as it is code that would need to be repeated). – kad81 Jun 17 '14 at 8:48
3  
@kad81, that's true, but you would still get the benefit of writing the logging and clean-up code in one place, and changing it in one place if need be, without the goofy semantics of catching the base Exception type then branching based on the exception type. And that one extra throw(); statement in each catch block is a small price to pay, IMO, and still leaves you in the position to do additional exception type-specific cleanup if necessary. – Craig Jun 18 '14 at 18:39
1  
Hi @Reitffunk, just use Func<Exception, MyEnumType> instead of Action<Exception>. That's Func<T, Result>, with Result being the return type. – Craig Mar 30 '15 at 16:42

For the sake of completeness, since .NET 4.0 the code can rewritten as:

Guid.TryParse(queryString["web"], out WebId);

TryParse never throws exceptions and returns false if format is wrong, setting WebId to Guid.Empty.

share|improve this answer
10  
Precisely--concise, and you totally bypass the performance penalty of handling the exception, the bad form of intentionally using exceptions to control program flow, and the soft focus of having your conversion logic spread around, a little bit here and a little bit there. – Craig Apr 17 '13 at 3:56
8  
I know what you meant, but of course Guid.TryParse never returns Guid.Empty. If the string is in an incorrect format, it sets the result output parameter to Guid.Empty, but it returns false. I'm mentioning it because I've seen code that does things in the style of Guid.TryParse(s, out guid); if (guid == Guid.Empty) { /* handle invalid s */ }, which is usually wrong if s could be the string representation of Guid.Empty. – hvd May 18 '13 at 11:39
12  
wow you have answered the question, except that it is not in the spirit of the question. The larger problem is something else :( – nawfal May 18 '13 at 20:01
5  
The proper pattern for using TryParse, of course, is more like if( Guid.TryParse(s, out guid){ /* success! */ } else { /* handle invalid s */ }, which leaves no ambiguity like the broken example where the input value might actually be the string representation of a Guid. – Craig Feb 22 '14 at 1:55
    
This answer may indeed be correct in regard to Guid.Parse, but it has missed the entire point of the original question. Which had nothing to do with Guid.Parse, but was in regard to catching Exception vs FormatException/OverflowException/etc. – Conor Gallagher Sep 14 '15 at 12:39
up vote 64 down vote
+100

As others have pointed out, you can have an if statement inside your catch block to determine what is going on. C#6 supports Exception Filters, so the following will work:

try { … }
catch (Exception e) when (MyFilter(e))
{
    …
}

The MyFilter method could then look something like this:

private bool MyFilter(Exception e)
{
  return e is ArgumentNullException || e is FormatException;
}

Alternatively, this can be all done inline (the right hand side of the when statement just has to be a boolean expression).

try { … }
catch (Exception e) when (e is ArgumentNullException || e is FormatException)
{
    …
}

This is different from using an if statement from within the catch block, using exception filters will not unwind the stack.

You can download Visual Studio 2015 to check this out.

If you want to continue using Visual Studio 2013, you can install the following nuget package:

Install-Package Microsoft.Net.Compilers

At time of writing, this will include support for C# 6.

Referencing this package will cause the project to be built using the specific version of the C# and Visual Basic compilers contained in the package, as opposed to any system installed version.

share|improve this answer
    
Patiently waiting for the official release of 6... I'd like to see this get the checky when that happens. – RubberDuck Feb 14 '15 at 13:41
    
@RubberDuck I am dying for the null propagation operator from C# 6. Trying to convince the rest of my team that the risk of an unstable language/compiler is worth it. Lots of minor improvements with huge impact. As for getting marked as answer, not important, as long as people realise this will/is possible, I'm happy. – Joe Feb 14 '15 at 19:52
    
Right?! I'll be taking a good look at my code base in the near future. =) I know the check isn't important, but given the accepted answer will soon be outdated, I'm hoping OP comes back to check this to give it the proper visibility. – RubberDuck Feb 14 '15 at 20:02
    
That's partially why I haven't awarded it yet @Joe. I want this to be visible. You may want to add an example of an inline filter for clarity though. – RubberDuck Oct 6 '15 at 16:15

If you can upgrade your application to C# 6 you are lucky. The new C# version has implemented Exception filters. So you can write this:

catch (Exception ex) when (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException) {
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}

Some people think this code is the same as

catch (Exception ex) {                
    if (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException) {
        WebId = Guid.Empty;
    }
    throw;
}

But it´s not. Actually this is the only new feature in C# 6 that is not possible to emulate in prior versions. First, a re-throw means more overhead than skipping the catch. Second, it is not semantically equivalent. The new feature preserves the stack intact when you are debugging your code. Without this feature the crash dump is less useful or even useless.

See a discussion about this on CodePlex. And an example showing the difference.

share|improve this answer

@Micheal

Slightly revised version of your code:

catch (Exception ex)
{
   Type exType = ex.GetType();
   if (exType == typeof(System.FormatException) || 
       exType == typeof(System.OverflowException)
   {
       WebId = Guid.Empty;
   } else {
      throw;
   }
}

String comparisons are ugly and slow.

share|improve this answer
18  
Why not just use the "is" keyword? – Chris Pietschmann Sep 25 '08 at 21:02
25  
@Michael - If Microsoft introduced, say, StringTooLongException derived from FormatException then it is still a format exception, just a specific one. It depends whether you want the semantics of 'catch this exact exception type' or 'catch exceptions that mean the format of the string was wrong'. – Greg Beech Sep 25 '08 at 21:19
6  
@Michael - Also, note that "catch (FormatException ex) has the latter semantics, it will catch anything derived from FormatException. – Greg Beech Sep 25 '08 at 21:21
14  
@Alex No. "throw" without "ex" carries the original exception, including original stack trace, up. Adding "ex" makes the stack trace reset, so you really get a different exception than the original. I'm sure someone else can explain it better than me. :) – Stuart Branham Sep 22 '10 at 22:04
11  
-1: This code is extremely fragile - a library developer could expect to replace throw new FormatException(); with throw new NewlyDerivedFromFormatException(); without breaking code using the library, and it will hold true for all exception handling cases except where someone used == instead of is (or simply catch (FormatException)). – Sam Harwell Jul 17 '13 at 3:47

The accepted answer seems acceptable, except that CodeAnalysis/FxCop will complain about the fact that it's catching a general exception type.

Also, it seems the "is" operator might degrade performance slightly.

CA1800: Do not cast unnecessarily says to "consider testing the result of the 'as' operator instead", but if you do that, you'll be writing more code than if you catch each exception separately.

Anyhow, here's what I would do:

bool exThrown = false;

try
{
    // Something
}
catch (FormatException) {
    exThrown = true;
}
catch (OverflowException) {
    exThrown = true;
}

if (exThrown)
{
    // Something else
}
share|improve this answer
16  
But be aware that you can't rethrow the exception without losing the stack trace if you do it like this. (See Michael Stum's comment to the accepted answer) – René Dec 9 '10 at 11:27
2  
This pattern can be improved by storing the exception(please excuse the poor formatting -- I can't figure out how to put code in comments): Exception ex = null; try { // something } catch( FormatException e){ ex = e; } catch( OverflowException e){ ex = e; } if( ex != null ) { // something else and deal with ex } – Jesse Weigert Mar 16 '12 at 20:03
3  
@JesseWeigert: 1. You can use backticks to give a piece of text a mono-spaced font and light grey background. 2. You still won't be able to rethrow the original exception including the stacktrace. – Oliver Nov 22 '12 at 17:19
    
"Also, it seems the "is" operator might degrade performance slightly. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182271.aspx says to "consider testing the result of the 'as' operator instead", but if you do that, you'll be writing more code than if you catch each exception separately." ... Exceptions are already a "slow" path... you should not be using exceptions in the regular course of your application (thus TryParse over Parse/Exception). Being concerned about micro-optimizations in this code path is overkill. – Clever Neologism Mar 10 '15 at 18:57
    
@CleverNeologism although it may be true that using the is operator may have a slight negative impact on performance, it's also true that an exception handler isn't the place to be overly concerned about optimizing performance. If your app is spending so much time in exception handlers that performance optimization there would make a real difference in app performance, then there are other code issues to take a hard look at. Having said that, I still don't like this solution because you lose the stack trace and because the cleanup is contextually removed from the catch statement. – Craig Sep 15 '15 at 7:22

This is a variant of Matt's answer (I feel that this is a bit cleaner)...use a method:

public void TryCatch(...)
{
    try
    {
       // something
       return;
    }
    catch (FormatException) {}
    catch (OverflowException) {}

    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}

Any other exceptions will be thrown and the code WebId = Guid.Empty; won't be hit. If you don't want other exceptions to crash your program, just add this AFTER the other two catches:

...
catch (Exception)
{
     // something, if anything
     return; // only need this if you follow the example I gave and put it all in a method
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 This will execute WebId = Guid.Emtpy in the case where no exception was thrown. – Sepster Oct 23 '12 at 13:41
3  
@sepster I think the return statement after "// something" is implied here. I do not really like the solution, but this is a constructive variant in the discussion. +1 to undo your downvote :-) – toong Oct 23 '12 at 21:12
    
@Sepster toong is right, I assumed that if you wanted a return there, then you would put one...I was trying to make my answer general enough to apply to all situations in case others with similar but not exact questions would benefit as well. However, for good measure, I've add a return to my answer. Thanks for the input. – bsara Oct 24 '12 at 17:27
catch (Exception ex)
{
    if (!(
        ex is FormatException ||
        ex is OverflowException))
    {
        throw;
    }
    Console.WriteLine("Hello");
}
share|improve this answer

If you don't want to use an if statement within the catch scopes, in C# 6.0 you can use Exception Filters syntax which was already supported by the CLR in previews versions but existed only in VB.NET/MSIL:

try
{
    WebId = new Guid(queryString["web"]);
}
catch (Exception exception) when (exception is FormatException || ex is OverflowException)
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}

This code will catch the Exception only when it's a InvalidDataException or ArgumentNullException.

Actually, you can put basically any condition inside that when clause:

static int a = 8;

...

catch (Exception exception) when (exception is InvalidDataException && a == 8)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Catch");
}

Note that as opposed to an if statement inside the catch's scope, Exception Filters cannot throw Exceptions, and when they do, or when the condition is not true, the next catch condition will be evaluated instead:

static int a = 7;

static int b = 0;

...

try
{
    throw new InvalidDataException();
}
catch (Exception exception) when (exception is InvalidDataException && a / b == 2)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Catch");
}
catch (Exception exception) when (exception is InvalidDataException || exception is ArgumentException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("General catch");
}

Output: General catch.

When there is more then one true Exception Filter - the first one will be accepted:

static int a = 8;

static int b = 4;

...

try
{
    throw new InvalidDataException();
}
catch (Exception exception) when (exception is InvalidDataException && a / b == 2)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Catch");
}
catch (Exception exception) when (exception is InvalidDataException || exception is ArgumentException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("General catch");
}

Output: Catch.

And as you can see in the MSIL the code is not translated to if statements, but to Filters, and Exceptions cannot be throw from within the areas marked with Filter 1 and Filter 2 but the filter throwing the Exception will fail instead, also the last comparison value pushed to the stack before the endfilter command will determine the success/failure of the filter (Catch 1 XOR Catch 2 will execute accordingly):

Exception Filters MSIL

Also, specifically Guid has the Guid.TryParse method.

share|improve this answer

Cautioned and Warned: Yet another kind, functional style.

What is in the link doesn't answer your question directly, but it's trivial to extend it to look like:

static void Main() 
{ 
    Action body = () => { ...your code... };

    body.Catch<InvalidOperationException>() 
        .Catch<BadCodeException>() 
        .Catch<AnotherException>(ex => { ...handler... })(); 
}

(Basically provide another empty Catch overload which returns itself)

The bigger question to this is why. I do not think the cost outweighs the gain here :)

share|improve this answer
1  
One possible advantage of this approach is that there's a semantic difference between catching and rethrowing an exception versus not catching it; in some cases, code should act upon an exception without catching it. Such a thing is possible in vb.net, but not in C# unless one uses a wrapper written in vb.net and called from C#. – supercat Jul 17 '13 at 2:43
    
How does on act on an exception without catching it? I do not fully understand you. – nawfal Jul 17 '13 at 7:20
    
@nawful ... using vb filter - function filt(ex as exception) :LogEx(ex):return false ... then in the catch line: catch ex when filt(ex) – FastAl Oct 7 '15 at 18:15

How about

try
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
    WebId = new Guid(queryString["web"]);
}
catch (FormatException)
{
}
catch (OverflowException)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works only if the Catch-Code can be fully moved into the Try-Block. But imaging code where you make multiple manipulations to an object, and one in the middle fails, and you want to "reset" the object. – Michael Stum Sep 25 '08 at 20:59
3  
In that case I would add a reset function and call that from multiple catch blocks. – Maurice Sep 25 '08 at 21:04

in C# 6 the recommended approach is to use Exception Filters, here is an example:

 try
 {
      throw new OverflowException();
 }
 catch(Exception e ) when ((e is DivideByZeroException) || (e is OverflowException))
 {
       // this will execute iff e is DividedByZeroEx or OverflowEx
       Console.WriteLine("E");
 }
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you mean when rather than if. – Jon Skeet Oct 7 '15 at 6:09
    
Yes, i think some one editted without asking me to approve. – Hassan Oct 7 '15 at 7:55
3  
Yup, you're right. @displayName: I think it may have been if in some CTPs, but it's definitely when now. – Jon Skeet Oct 7 '15 at 7:56
1  
@JonSkeet & Hassan: Apologize. I didn't even know when they updated the syntax behind my back. :) :D – displayName Oct 7 '15 at 13:58

Update 2015-12-15: See http://stackoverflow.com/a/22864936/1718702 for C#6. It's a cleaner and now standard in the language.

Geared for people that want a more elegant solution to catch once and filter exceptions, I use an extension method as demonstrated below.

I already had this extension in my library, originally written for other purposes, but it worked just perfectly for type checking on exceptions. Plus, imho, it looks cleaner than a bunch of || statements. Also, unlike the accepted answer, I prefer explicit exception handling so ex is ... had undesireable behaviour as derrived classes are assignable to there parent types).

Usage

if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
    typeof(FormatException),
    typeof(ArgumentException)))
{
    // Handle
}
else
    throw;

IsAnyOf.cs Extension (See Full Error Handling Example for Dependancies)

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter matches at least one of the passed in comparisons.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_comparisons">Values to compare against.</param>
        /// <returns>True if a match is found.</returns>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        public static bool IsAnyOf<T>(this T p_parameter, params T[] p_comparisons)
        {
            // Validate
            p_parameter
                .CannotBeNull("p_parameter");
            p_comparisons
                .CannotBeNullOrEmpty("p_comparisons");

            // Test for any match
            foreach (var item in p_comparisons)
                if (p_parameter.Equals(item))
                    return true;

            // Return no matches found
            return false;
        }
    }
}

Full Error Handling Example (Copy-Paste to new Console app)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Common.FluentValidation;

namespace IsAnyOfExceptionHandlerSample
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // High Level Error Handler (Log and Crash App)
            try
            {
                Foo();
            }
            catch (OutOfMemoryException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("FATAL ERROR! System Crashing. " + ex.Message);
                Console.ReadKey();
            }
        }

        static void Foo()
        {
            // Init
            List<Action<string>> TestActions = new List<Action<string>>()
            {
                (key) => { throw new FormatException(); },
                (key) => { throw new ArgumentException(); },
                (key) => { throw new KeyNotFoundException();},
                (key) => { throw new OutOfMemoryException(); },
            };

            // Run
            foreach (var FooAction in TestActions)
            {
                // Mid-Level Error Handler (Appends Data for Log)
                try
                {
                    // Init
                    var SomeKeyPassedToFoo = "FooParam";

                    // Low-Level Handler (Handle/Log and Keep going)
                    try
                    {
                        FooAction(SomeKeyPassedToFoo);
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
                            typeof(FormatException),
                            typeof(ArgumentException)))
                        {
                            // Handle
                            Console.WriteLine("ex was {0}", ex.GetType().Name);
                            Console.ReadKey();
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            // Add some Debug info
                            ex.Data.Add("SomeKeyPassedToFoo", SomeKeyPassedToFoo.ToString());
                            throw;
                        }
                    }
                }
                catch (KeyNotFoundException ex)
                {
                    // Handle differently
                    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);

                    int Count = 0;
                    if (!Validate.IsAnyNull(ex, ex.Data, ex.Data.Keys))
                        foreach (var Key in ex.Data.Keys)
                            Console.WriteLine(
                                "[{0}][\"{1}\" = {2}]",
                                Count, Key, ex.Data[Key]);

                    Console.ReadKey();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter matches at least one of the passed in comparisons.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_comparisons">Values to compare against.</param>
        /// <returns>True if a match is found.</returns>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        public static bool IsAnyOf<T>(this T p_parameter, params T[] p_comparisons)
        {
            // Validate
            p_parameter
                .CannotBeNull("p_parameter");
            p_comparisons
                .CannotBeNullOrEmpty("p_comparisons");

            // Test for any match
            foreach (var item in p_comparisons)
                if (p_parameter.Equals(item))
                    return true;

            // Return no matches found
            return false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Validates if any passed in parameter is equal to null.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="p_parameters">Parameters to test for Null.</param>
        /// <returns>True if one or more parameters are null.</returns>
        public static bool IsAnyNull(params object[] p_parameters)
        {
            p_parameters
                .CannotBeNullOrEmpty("p_parameters");

            foreach (var item in p_parameters)
                if (item == null)
                    return true;

            return false;
        }
    }
}

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter is not null, throwing a detailed exception message if the test fails.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_name">Name of tested parameter to assist with debugging.</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        public static void CannotBeNull(this object p_parameter, string p_name)
        {
            if (p_parameter == null)
                throw
                    new
                        ArgumentNullException(
                        string.Format("Parameter \"{0}\" cannot be null.",
                        p_name), default(Exception));
        }
    }
}

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter is not null or an empty collection, throwing a detailed exception message if the test fails.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_name">Name of tested parameter to assist with debugging.</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentOutOfRangeException"></exception>
        public static void CannotBeNullOrEmpty<T>(this ICollection<T> p_parameter, string p_name)
        {
            if (p_parameter == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("Collection cannot be null.\r\nParameter_Name: " + p_name, default(Exception));

            if (p_parameter.Count <= 0)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Collection cannot be empty.\r\nParameter_Name: " + p_name, default(Exception));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter is not null or empty, throwing a detailed exception message if the test fails.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_name">Name of tested parameter to assist with debugging.</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentException"></exception>
        public static void CannotBeNullOrEmpty(this string p_parameter, string p_name)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(p_parameter))
                throw new ArgumentException("String cannot be null or empty.\r\nParameter_Name: " + p_name, default(Exception));
        }
    }
}

Two Sample NUnit Unit Tests

Matching behaviour for Exception types is exact (ie. A child IS NOT a match for any of its parent types).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Common.FluentValidation;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace UnitTests.Common.Fluent_Validations
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class IsAnyOf_Tests
    {
        [Test, ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentNullException))]
        public void IsAnyOf_ArgumentNullException_ShouldNotMatch_ArgumentException_Test()
        {
            Action TestMethod = () => { throw new ArgumentNullException(); };

            try
            {
                TestMethod();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
                    typeof(ArgumentException), /*Note: ArgumentNullException derrived from ArgumentException*/
                    typeof(FormatException),
                    typeof(KeyNotFoundException)))
                {
                    // Handle expected Exceptions
                    return;
                }

                //else throw original
                throw;
            }
        }

        [Test, ExpectedException(typeof(OutOfMemoryException))]
        public void IsAnyOf_OutOfMemoryException_ShouldMatch_OutOfMemoryException_Test()
        {
            Action TestMethod = () => { throw new OutOfMemoryException(); };

            try
            {
                TestMethod();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
                    typeof(OutOfMemoryException),
                    typeof(StackOverflowException)))
                    throw;

                /*else... Handle other exception types, typically by logging to file*/
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Enhancing the language is not "more elegent". In many places this actually created a maintenance hell. Years later, many programmers are not proud of what monster they created. It's not what you are used to read. It may cause a "huh?" effect, or even severe "WTFs". It's confusing, sometimes. The only thing it does is making the code much harder to grasp for those who need to deal with it later in maintenance - only because a single programmer tried to be "clever". Over the years, i learned that those "clever" solutions are seldomly also the good ones. – Kaii Oct 9 '14 at 21:02
    
or in a few words: stick with the possibilites the language natively provides. don't try to override the semantics of a language, only because you don't like them. Your collegues (and possibly future-me) will thank you, honestly. – Kaii Oct 9 '14 at 21:07

Since I felt like these answers just touched the surface, I attempted to dig a bit deeper.

So what we would really want to do is something that doesn't compile, say:

// Won't compile... damn
public static void Main()
{
    try
    {
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
    }
    catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException)
    catch (IndexOutOfRangeException) 
    {
        // ... handle
    }

The reason we want this is because we don't want the exception handler to catch things that we need later on in the process. Sure, we can catch an Exception and check with an 'if' what to do, but let's be honest, we don't really want that. (FxCop, debugger issues, uglyness)

So why won't this code compile - and how can we hack it in such a way that it will?

If we look at the code, what we really would like to do is forward the call. However, according to the MS Partition II, IL exception handler blocks won't work like this, which in this case makes sense because that would imply that the 'exception' object can have different types.

Or to write it in code, we ask the compiler to do something like this (well it's not entirely correct, but it's the closest possible thing I guess):

// Won't compile... damn
try
{
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException();
}
catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException e) {
    goto theOtherHandler;
}
catch (IndexOutOfRangeException e) {
theOtherHandler:
    Console.WriteLine("Handle!");
}

The reason that this won't compile is quite obvious: what type and value would the '$exception' object have (which are here stored in the variables 'e')? The way we want the compiler to handle this is to note that the common base type of both exceptions is 'Exception', use that for a variable to contain both exceptions, and then handle only the two exceptions that are caught. The way this is implemented in IL is as 'filter', which is available in VB.Net.

To make it work in C#, we need a temporary variable with the correct 'Exception' base type. To control the flow of the code, we can add some branches. Here goes:

    Exception ex;
    try
    {
        throw new ArgumentException(); // for demo purposes; won't be caught.
        goto noCatch;
    }
    catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException e) {
        ex = e;
    }
    catch (IndexOutOfRangeException e) {
        ex = e;
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Handle the exception 'ex' here :-)");
    // throw ex ?

noCatch:
    Console.WriteLine("We're done with the exception handling.");

The obvious disadvantages for this are that we cannot re-throw properly, and -well let's be honest- that it's quite the ugly solution. The uglyness can be fixed a bit by performing branch elimination, which makes the solution slightly better:

Exception ex = null;
try
{
    throw new ArgumentException();
}
catch (ArgumentOutOfRangeException e)
{
    ex = e;
}
catch (IndexOutOfRangeException e)
{
    ex = e;
}
if (ex != null)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Handle the exception here :-)");
}

That leaves just the 're-throw'. For this to work, we need to be able to perform the handling inside the 'catch' block - and the only way to make this work is by an catching 'Exception' object.

At this point, we can add a separate function that handles the different types of Exceptions using overload resolution, or to handle the Exception. Both have disadvantages. To start, here's the way to do it with a helper function:

private static bool Handle(Exception e)
{
    Console.WriteLine("Handle the exception here :-)");
    return true; // false will re-throw;
}

public static void Main()
{
    try
    {
        throw new OutOfMemoryException();
    }
    catch (ArgumentException e)
    {
        if (!Handle(e)) { throw; }
    }
    catch (IndexOutOfRangeException e)
    {
        if (!Handle(e)) { throw; }
    }

    Console.WriteLine("We're done with the exception handling.");

And the other solution is to catch the Exception object and handle it accordingly. The most literal translation for this, based on the context above is this:

try
{
    throw new ArgumentException();
}
catch (Exception e)
{
    Exception ex = (Exception)(e as ArgumentException) ?? (e as IndexOutOfRangeException);
    if (ex != null)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Handle the exception here :-)");
        // throw ?
    }
    else 
    {
        throw;
    }
}

So to conclude:

  • If we don't want to re-throw, we might consider catching the right exceptions, and storing them in a temporary.
  • If the handler is simple, and we want to re-use code, the best solution is probably to introduce a helper function.
  • If we want to re-throw, we have no choice but to put the code in a 'Exception' catch handler, which will break FxCop and your debugger's uncaught exceptions.
share|improve this answer

Joseph Daigle's Answer is a good solution, but I found the following structure to be a bit tidier and less error prone.

catch(Exception ex)
{   
    if (!(ex is SomeException || ex is OtherException)) throw;

    // Handle exception
}

There are a few advantages of inverting the expression:

  • A return statement is not necessary
  • The code isn't nested
  • There's no risk of forgetting the 'throw' or 'return' statements that in Joseph's solution are separated from the expression.

It can even be compacted to a single line (though not very pretty)

catch(Exception ex) { if (!(ex is SomeException || ex is OtherException)) throw;

    // Handle exception
}

Edit: The exception filtering in C# 6.0 will make the syntax a bit cleaner and comes with a number of other benefits over any current solution. (most notably leaving the stack unharmed)

Here is how the same problem would look using C# 6.0 syntax:

catch(Exception ex) if (ex is SomeException || ex is OtherException)
{
    // Handle exception
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, this is the best answer. It's better than the top answer mostly because there's no return, although inverting the condition is also a little better. – DCShannon Mar 18 '15 at 20:22
    
I didn't even think of that. Good catch, I'll add it to the list. – Stefan T Mar 20 '15 at 0:35

A little mind twister, probably not for real life use, posting here just for the sake of having another option and seeing how ugly it is

   catch (Exception ex)            
   {                
       if (ex is FormatException ||
           ex is OverflowException) 
       {} else throw;

       WebId = Guid.Empty;
   }
share|improve this answer
12  
-1: convoluted version of accepted answer, with no added value. – ANeves Jan 10 '11 at 19:24
    
You get less nesting - so called exit early strategy. But I must confess I would never write such code in real life. I posted it just for the sake of having more alternatives. – Konstantin Spirin Jan 11 '11 at 2:09
4  
Spirit, seems to me you have the same amount of nesting, but with less readibility. :( Did you mean if (!ex is FormatException && !ex is OverflowException){ throw; } WebId = Guid.Empty; ? (And doesn't exit early imply using return? Maybe not.) – ANeves Jan 27 '11 at 13:52

Note that I did find one way to do it, but this looks more like material for The Daily WTF:

catch (Exception ex)
{
    switch (ex.GetType().Name)
    {
        case "System.FormatException":
        case "System.OverflowException":
            WebId = Guid.Empty;
            break;
        default:
            throw;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
6  
-1 vote, +5 WTF :-) This should not have been marked as an answer, but it is he-larious. – Aaron Sep 25 '08 at 21:23
    
Can't decide if I should downvote this because it's bad code or upvote because it's bad code... – saluce Nov 13 '15 at 16:31
1  
Doesn't matter how simply we could do it. But he didn't sit idle and came up with his view to solve it. Really appreciate. – Maxymus Jan 21 at 10:27
    
Don't actually do this though, use Exception Filters in C# 6 or any of the other answers - I put this here specifically as "This is one way, but it's bad and I want to do something better". – Michael Stum Jan 21 at 19:16

Just my 10 cents.

First, you are referring to the situation, when same recovery steps apply regardless of the exception type; and the exception itself is not of an interest. There are 2 cases:

With Guid and other nicely designed types, I always use TryParse methods exposed by them.

When there is no TryXXX method exposed, I define one and go with it. In other words, instead of catching a general type of exception and then checking its type, I would wrap this catch inside a method (encapsulate) and would return a boolean indicating whether the operation succeeded. This way, you don't have a performance drawback, and your main (caller) method still looks nice:

if (!TryParsingWebId(queryString["web"], out WebId))
{
    WebId = _defaultWebIdValue; //Imagine it's not Guid, otherwise TryParse.
}

I am leaving up to you the implementation of the TryParsingWebId method.

If I were MS, I would implement a syntactical sugar to support multiple catch indicators for the same catch block, without allowing to indicate the variable for the exception. Implementation would be to catch each of the specified exceptions, and then execute the block shared among them. Something like switch statement. But such syntactical sugar does not exist, and I just suggested you to implement a closely-standing workaround.

share|improve this answer

In c# 6.0,Exception Filters is improvements for exception handling

try
{
    DoSomeHttpRequest();
}
catch (System.Web.HttpException e)
{
    switch (e.GetHttpCode())
    {
        case 400:
            WriteLine("Bad Request");
        case 500:
            WriteLine("Internal Server Error");
        default:
            WriteLine("Generic Error");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
This example does not show any use of exception filters. – Stijn May 27 '15 at 13:37
    
This is standard way to filter exception in c#6.0 – Kashif May 27 '15 at 13:42
    
Take a look again at what exactly exception filters are. You are not using an exception filter in your example. There's a proper example in this answer posted a year before yours. – Stijn May 27 '15 at 13:44
2  
An example of exception filtering would be catch (HttpException e) when e.GetHttpCode() == 400 { WriteLine("Bad Request"; } – saluce Nov 13 '15 at 16:29

protected by durron597 Sep 23 '15 at 18:16

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