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It is discouraged to simply catch System.Exception, instead only the "known" Exceptions should be caught.

Now, this sometimes leads to unneccessary repetetive code, for example:

try
{
    WebId = new Guid(queryString["web"]);
}
catch (FormatException)
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}
catch (OverflowException)
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}

I wonder: Is there a way to catch both Exceptions and only call the WebId = Guid.Empty call once?

Edit: the given example is rather simple, as it's only a Guid. But imagine Code where you modify an object multiple times, and if one of the manipulations fail in an expected way, you want to "reset" the object. However, if there is an unexpected Exception, I still want to throw that higher.

About the Answer: Thanks everyone! For some reason, I had my mind set on a switch-case statement which does not support switching on GetType(). Now, there were two answers, one using "typeof" and one using "is". I first thought typeof() would be my Function because I thought "Hey, I only want to catch FormatException because that's the only thing I expect". But that's not how catch() works: catch also catches all derived exceptions. After thinking about it, this is really obvious: Otherwise, catch(Exception ex) would not work! So the correct answer is "is". Yay, learned two things with only one question \o/

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3  
If you are using .net 4 and above i prefer to use aggregateexception msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.aggregateexception.aspx –  Bepenfriends Oct 18 '13 at 3:21
    
Bepenfriends- Since System.Guid does not throw AggregateException, it would be great if you (or someone) could post an answer showing how you would wrap it into an AggregateException etc.. –  user704808 Jan 30 at 18:53
add comment

15 Answers

up vote 608 down vote accepted

Catch System.Exception and switch on the types

catch (Exception ex)            
{                
    if (ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException)
    {
        WebId = Guid.Empty;
        return;
    }

    throw;
}
share|improve this answer
24  
You don't have to put the "ex" in there. The throw; is sufficient. –  mkelley33 May 3 '09 at 15:31
469  
throw ex is one if those really common mistakes. As a rule of thumb: You NEVER want to throw ex, since that generates a new exception, with an empty call stack. throw simply throws the existing exception higher. –  Michael Stum May 5 '09 at 10:39
10  
Unfortunately, FxCop (ie - Visual Studio Code Analysis) doesn't like it when you catch Exception. –  Andrew Garrison Aug 27 '10 at 19:48
117  
@Andrew... yeah, well, FxCop treats objects like women, man. –  user414076 Sep 3 '10 at 2:26
12  
The else is kind of redundant. –  slypete May 9 '12 at 6:28
show 13 more comments

Not in C# unfortunately, as you'd need an exception filter to do it and C# doesn't expose that feature of MSIL. VB.NET does have this capability though, e.g.

Catch ex As Exception When TypeOf ex Is FormatException OrElse TypeOf ex Is OverflowException

What you could do is use an anonymous function to encapsulate your on-error code, and then call it in those specific catch blocks:

Action onError = () => WebId = Guid.Empty;
try
{
    // something
}
catch (FormatException)
{
    onError();
}
catch (OverflowException)
{
    onError();
}
share|improve this answer
14  
Interesting idea and another example that VB.net has some interesting advantages over C# sometimes –  Michael Stum Sep 25 '08 at 21:19
2  
hmmm.... makes me think of using IL rewriting ;) –  Jim Deville Jul 30 '10 at 6:00
2  
@MichaelStum I always felt VB is more powerful but less readable than C# contrary to popular belief. –  nawfal May 18 '13 at 20:03
3  
Isn't it honestly about time MS finally just let VB go, really? –  Craig Oct 11 '13 at 23:37
5  
Not at all Craig, dont ever think on that :) –  SoMoS Oct 16 '13 at 18:34
show 2 more comments

For the sake of completeness, since .NET 4.0 the code can rewritten as:

Guid.TryParse(queryString["web"], out WebId);

TryParse never throws exceptions and returns false if format is wrong, setting WebId to Guid.Empty.

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5  
Precisely--concise, and you totally bypass the performance penalty of handling the exception, the bad form of intentionally using exceptions to control program flow, and the soft focus of having your conversion logic spread around, a little bit here and a little bit there. –  Craig Apr 17 '13 at 3:56
6  
I know what you meant, but of course Guid.TryParse never returns Guid.Empty. If the string is in an incorrect format, it sets the result output parameter to Guid.Empty, but it returns false. I'm mentioning it because I've seen code that does things in the style of Guid.TryParse(s, out guid); if (guid == Guid.Empty) { /* handle invalid s */ }, which is usually wrong if s could be the string representation of Guid.Empty. –  hvd May 18 '13 at 11:39
6  
wow you have answered the question, except that it is not in the spirit of the question. The larger problem is something else :( –  nawfal May 18 '13 at 20:01
    
The proper pattern for using TryParse, of course, is more like if( Guid.TryParse(s, out guid){ /* success! */ } else { /* handle invalid s */ }, which leaves no ambiguity like the broken example where the input value might actually be the string representation of a Guid. –  Craig Feb 22 at 1:55
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@Micheal

Slightly revised version of your code:

catch (Exception ex)
{
   Type exType = ex.GetType();
   if (exType == typeof(System.FormatException) || 
       exType == typeof(System.OverflowException)
   {
       WebId = Guid.Empty;
   } else {
      throw;
   }
}

String comparisons are ugly and slow.

share|improve this answer
11  
Why not just use the "is" keyword? –  Chris Pietschmann Sep 25 '08 at 21:02
16  
@Michael - If Microsoft introduced, say, StringTooLongException derived from FormatException then it is still a format exception, just a specific one. It depends whether you want the semantics of 'catch this exact exception type' or 'catch exceptions that mean the format of the string was wrong'. –  Greg Beech Sep 25 '08 at 21:19
4  
@Michael - Also, note that "catch (FormatException ex) has the latter semantics, it will catch anything derived from FormatException. –  Greg Beech Sep 25 '08 at 21:21
11  
@Alex No. "throw" without "ex" carries the original exception, including original stack trace, up. Adding "ex" makes the stack trace reset, so you really get a different exception than the original. I'm sure someone else can explain it better than me. :) –  Stuart Branham Sep 22 '10 at 22:04
4  
-1: This code is extremely fragile - a library developer could expect to replace throw new FormatException(); with throw new NewlyDerivedFromFormatException(); without breaking code using the library, and it will hold true for all exception handling cases except where someone used == instead of is (or simply catch (FormatException)). –  280Z28 Jul 17 '13 at 3:47
show 13 more comments

The accepted answer seems acceptable, except that CodeAnalysis/FxCop will complain about the fact that it's catching a general exception type.

Also, it seems the "is" operator might degrade performance slightly. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182271.aspx says to "consider testing the result of the 'as' operator instead", but if you do that, you'll be writing more code than if you catch each exception separately.

Anyhow, here's what I would do:

bool exThrown = false;

try
{
    // something
}
catch( FormatException ){ exThrown = true; }
catch( OverflowException ){ exThrown = true; }

if( exThrown )
{
    // something else
}
share|improve this answer
12  
But be aware that you can't rethrow the exception without losing the stack trace if you do it like this. (See Michael Stum's comment to the accepted answer) –  René Dec 9 '10 at 11:27
    
This pattern can be improved by storing the exception(please excuse the poor formatting -- I can't figure out how to put code in comments): Exception ex = null; try { // something } catch( FormatException e){ ex = e; } catch( OverflowException e){ ex = e; } if( ex != null ) { // something else and deal with ex } –  Jesse Weigert Mar 16 '12 at 20:03
2  
@JesseWeigert: 1. You can use backticks to give a piece of text a mono-spaced font and light grey background. 2. You still won't be able to rethrow the original exception including the stacktrace. –  Oliver Nov 22 '12 at 17:19
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I know I'm a little late to the party here, but holy smoke...

Cutting straight to the chase, this kind of duplicates an earlier answer, but if you really want to perform a common action for several exception types and keep the whole thing neat and tidy within the scope of the one method, why not just use a lambda/closure/inline function do something like the following? I mean, chances are pretty good that you'll end up realizing that you just want to make that closure a separate method that you can utilize all over the place. But then it will be super easy to do that without actually changing the rest of the code structurally. Right?

private void TestMethod ()
{
    Action<Exception> errorHandler = ( ex ) => {
        // write to a log, whatever...
    };

    try
        {
        // try some stuff
        }
    catch ( FormatException  ex ) { errorHandler ( ex ); }
    catch ( OverflowException ex ) { errorHandler ( ex ); }
    catch ( ArgumentNullException ex ) { errorHandler ( ex ); }
}

I can't help but wonder (warning: a little irony/sarcasm ahead) why on earth go to all this effort to basically just replace the following:

try
    {
    // try some stuff
    }
catch( FormatException ex ){}
catch( OverflowException ex ){}
catch( ArgumentNullException ex ){}

...with some crazy variation of this next code smell, I mean example, only to pretend that you're saving a few keystrokes.

// sorta sucks, let's be honest...
try
    {
    // try some stuff
    }
catch( Exception ex )
    {
    if (
        ex is FormatException
        || ex is OverflowException
        || ex is ArgumentNullException
        )
        {
        // write to a log, whatever...
        return;
        }
    throw;
    }

Because it certainly isn't automatically more readable.

Granted, I left the three identical instances of /* write to a log, whatever... */ return; out of the first example.

But that's sort of my point. Y'all have heard of functions/methods, right? Seriously. Write a common ErrorHandler function and, like, call it from each catch block.

If you ask me, the second example (with the if and is keywords) is both significantly less readable, and simultaneously significantly more error-prone during the maintenance phase of your project.

The maintenance phase, for anyone who might be relatively new to programming, is going to comprise 98.7% or more of the overall lifetime of your project, and the poor schmuck doing the maintenance is almost certainly going to be someone other than you. And there is a very good chance they will spend 50% of their time on the job cursing your name.

And of course FxCop barks at you and so you have to also add an attribute to your code that has precisely zip to do with the running program, and is only there to tell FxCop to ignore an issue that in 99.9% of cases it is totally correct in flagging. And, sorry, I might be mistaken, but doesn't that "ignore" attribute end up actually compiled into your app?

Would putting the entire if test on one line make it more readable? I don't think so. I mean, I did have another programmer vehemently argue once long ago that putting more code on one line would make it "run faster." But of course he was stark raving nuts. Trying to explain to him (with a straight face--which was challenging) how the interpreter or compiler would break that long line apart into discrete one-instruction-per-line statements--essentially identical to the result if he had gone ahead and just made the code readable instead of trying to out-clever the compiler--had no effect on him whatsoever. But I digress.

How much less readable does this get when you add three more exception types, a month or two from now? (Answer: it gets a lot less readable).

One of the major points, really, is that most of the point of formatting the textual source code that we're all looking at every day is to make it really, really obvious to other human beings what is actually happening when the code runs. Because the compiler turns the source code into something totally different and couldn't care less about your code formatting style. So all-on-one-line totally sucks, too.

Just saying...

// super sucks...
catch( Exception ex )
    {
    if ( ex is FormatException || ex is OverflowException || ex is ArgumentNullException )
        {
        // write to a log, whatever...
        return;
        }
    throw;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
@BrainSTorm.exe, Thanks for the edit (oops). :-) –  Craig Oct 28 '13 at 0:10
    
When I first stumbled across this question I was all over the accepted answer. Cool I can just catch all Exceptions and the check the type. I thought it cleaned up the code, but something kept me coming back to the question and I actually read the other answers to the question. I chewed on it for a while, but I have to agree with you. It is more readable and maintainable to use a function to dry up your code than to catch everything, check the type comparing against a list, wrapping code, and throwing. Thanks for coming late and providing an alternative and sane (IMO) option. +1. –  erroric Mar 6 at 14:55
    
A convert!! :-) –  Craig Mar 10 at 14:00
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This is a variant of Matt's answer (I feel that this is a bit cleaner)...use a method:

public void TryCatch(...)
{
    try
    {
       // something
       return;
    }
    catch (FormatException) {}
    catch (OverflowException) {}

    WebId = Guid.Empty;
}

Any other exceptions will be thrown and the code WebId = Guid.Empty; won't be hit. If you don't want other exceptions to crash your program, just add this AFTER the other two catches:

...
catch (Exception)
{
     // something, if anything
     return; // only need this if you follow the example I gave and put it all in a method
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 This will execute WebId = Guid.Emtpy in the case where no exception was thrown. –  Sepster Oct 23 '12 at 13:41
1  
@sepster I think the return statement after "// something" is implied here. I do not really like the solution, but this is a constructive variant in the discussion. +1 to undo your downvote :-) –  toong Oct 23 '12 at 21:12
    
@Sepster toong is right, I assumed that if you wanted a return there, then you would put one...I was trying to make my answer general enough to apply to all situations in case others with similar but not exact questions would benefit as well. However, for good measure, I've add a return to my answer. Thanks for the input. –  bsara Oct 24 '12 at 17:27
    
@toong Of course. Removed my downvote ;-) –  Sepster Oct 25 '12 at 14:33
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        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            if (!(
                ex is FormatException ||
                ex is OverflowException))
            {
                throw;
            }

            Console.WriteLine("Hello");
        }
share|improve this answer
add comment

How about

try
{
    WebId = Guid.Empty;
    WebId = new Guid(queryString["web"]);
}
catch (FormatException)
{
}
catch (OverflowException)
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
That works only if the Catch-Code can be fully moved into the Try-Block. But imaging code where you make multiple manipulations to an object, and one in the middle fails, and you want to "reset" the object. –  Michael Stum Sep 25 '08 at 20:59
1  
In that case I would add a reset function and call that from multiple catch blocks. –  Maurice Sep 25 '08 at 21:04
add comment

Cautioned and Warned: Yet another kind, functional style.

What is in the link doesn't answer your question directly, but it's trivial to extend it to look like:

static void Main() 
{ 
    Action body = () => { ...your code... };

    body.Catch<InvalidOperationException>() 
        .Catch<BadCodeException>() 
        .Catch<AnotherException>(ex => { ...handler... })(); 
}

(Basically provide another empty Catch overload which returns itself)

The bigger question to this is why. I do not think the cost outweighs the gain here :)

share|improve this answer
    
One possible advantage of this approach is that there's a semantic difference between catching and rethrowing an exception versus not catching it; in some cases, code should act upon an exception without catching it. Such a thing is possible in vb.net, but not in C# unless one uses a wrapper written in vb.net and called from C#. –  supercat Jul 17 '13 at 2:43
    
How does on act on an exception without catching it? I do not fully understand you. –  nawfal Jul 17 '13 at 7:20
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Geared for people that want a more elegant solution to catch once and filter exceptions, I use an extension method as demonstrated below.

I already had this extension in my library, originally written for other purposes, but it worked just perfectly for type checking on exceptions. Plus, imho, it looks cleaner than a bunch of || statements. Also, unlike the accepted answer, I prefer explicit exception handling so ex is ... had undesireable behaviour as derrived classes are assignable to there parent types).

Usage

if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
    typeof(FormatException),
    typeof(ArgumentException)))
{
    // Handle
}
else
    throw;

IsAnyOf.cs Extension (See Full Error Handling Example for Dependancies)

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter matches at least one of the passed in comparisons.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_comparisons">Values to compare against.</param>
        /// <returns>True if a match is found.</returns>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        public static bool IsAnyOf<T>(this T p_parameter, params T[] p_comparisons)
        {
            // Validate
            p_parameter
                .CannotBeNull("p_parameter");
            p_comparisons
                .CannotBeNullOrEmpty("p_comparisons");

            // Test for any match
            foreach (var item in p_comparisons)
                if (p_parameter.Equals(item))
                    return true;

            // Return no matches found
            return false;
        }
    }
}

Full Error Handling Example (Copy-Paste to new Console app)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using Common.FluentValidation;

namespace IsAnyOfExceptionHandlerSample
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // High Level Error Handler (Log and Crash App)
            try
            {
                Foo();
            }
            catch (OutOfMemoryException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("FATAL ERROR! System Crashing. " + ex.Message);
                Console.ReadKey();
            }
        }

        static void Foo()
        {
            // Init
            List<Action<string>> TestActions = new List<Action<string>>()
            {
                (key) => { throw new FormatException(); },
                (key) => { throw new ArgumentException(); },
                (key) => { throw new KeyNotFoundException();},
                (key) => { throw new OutOfMemoryException(); },
            };

            // Run
            foreach (var FooAction in TestActions)
            {
                // Mid-Level Error Handler (Appends Data for Log)
                try
                {
                    // Init
                    var SomeKeyPassedToFoo = "FooParam";

                    // Low-Level Handler (Handle/Log and Keep going)
                    try
                    {
                        FooAction(SomeKeyPassedToFoo);
                    }
                    catch (Exception ex)
                    {
                        if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
                            typeof(FormatException),
                            typeof(ArgumentException)))
                        {
                            // Handle
                            Console.WriteLine("ex was {0}", ex.GetType().Name);
                            Console.ReadKey();
                        }
                        else
                        {
                            // Add some Debug info
                            ex.Data.Add("SomeKeyPassedToFoo", SomeKeyPassedToFoo.ToString());
                            throw;
                        }
                    }
                }
                catch (KeyNotFoundException ex)
                {
                    // Handle differently
                    Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);

                    int Count = 0;
                    if (!Validate.IsAnyNull(ex, ex.Data, ex.Data.Keys))
                        foreach (var Key in ex.Data.Keys)
                            Console.WriteLine(
                                "[{0}][\"{1}\" = {2}]",
                                Count, Key, ex.Data[Key]);

                    Console.ReadKey();
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter matches at least one of the passed in comparisons.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_comparisons">Values to compare against.</param>
        /// <returns>True if a match is found.</returns>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        public static bool IsAnyOf<T>(this T p_parameter, params T[] p_comparisons)
        {
            // Validate
            p_parameter
                .CannotBeNull("p_parameter");
            p_comparisons
                .CannotBeNullOrEmpty("p_comparisons");

            // Test for any match
            foreach (var item in p_comparisons)
                if (p_parameter.Equals(item))
                    return true;

            // Return no matches found
            return false;
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Validates if any passed in parameter is equal to null.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="p_parameters">Parameters to test for Null.</param>
        /// <returns>True if one or more parameters are null.</returns>
        public static bool IsAnyNull(params object[] p_parameters)
        {
            p_parameters
                .CannotBeNullOrEmpty("p_parameters");

            foreach (var item in p_parameters)
                if (item == null)
                    return true;

            return false;
        }
    }
}

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter is not null, throwing a detailed exception message if the test fails.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_name">Name of tested parameter to assist with debugging.</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        public static void CannotBeNull(this object p_parameter, string p_name)
        {
            if (p_parameter == null)
                throw
                    new
                        ArgumentNullException(
                        string.Format("Parameter \"{0}\" cannot be null.",
                        p_name), default(Exception));
        }
    }
}

namespace Common.FluentValidation
{
    public static partial class Validate
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter is not null or an empty collection, throwing a detailed exception message if the test fails.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_name">Name of tested parameter to assist with debugging.</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentNullException"></exception>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentOutOfRangeException"></exception>
        public static void CannotBeNullOrEmpty<T>(this ICollection<T> p_parameter, string p_name)
        {
            if (p_parameter == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("Collection cannot be null.\r\nParameter_Name: " + p_name, default(Exception));

            if (p_parameter.Count <= 0)
                throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("Collection cannot be empty.\r\nParameter_Name: " + p_name, default(Exception));
        }

        /// <summary>
        /// Validates the passed in parameter is not null or empty, throwing a detailed exception message if the test fails.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="p_parameter">Parameter to validate.</param>
        /// <param name="p_name">Name of tested parameter to assist with debugging.</param>
        /// <exception cref="ArgumentException"></exception>
        public static void CannotBeNullOrEmpty(this string p_parameter, string p_name)
        {
            if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(p_parameter))
                throw new ArgumentException("String cannot be null or empty.\r\nParameter_Name: " + p_name, default(Exception));
        }
    }
}

Two Sample NUnit Unit Tests

Matching behaviour for Exception types is exact (ie. A child IS NOT a match for any of its parent types).

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using Common.FluentValidation;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace UnitTests.Common.Fluent_Validations
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class IsAnyOf_Tests
    {
        [Test, ExpectedException(typeof(ArgumentNullException))]
        public void IsAnyOf_ArgumentNullException_ShouldNotMatch_ArgumentException_Test()
        {
            Action TestMethod = () => { throw new ArgumentNullException(); };

            try
            {
                TestMethod();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
                    typeof(ArgumentException), /*Note: ArgumentNullException derrived from ArgumentException*/
                    typeof(FormatException),
                    typeof(KeyNotFoundException)))
                {
                    // Handle expected Exceptions
                    return;
                }

                //else throw original
                throw;
            }
        }

        [Test, ExpectedException(typeof(OutOfMemoryException))]
        public void IsAnyOf_OutOfMemoryException_ShouldMatch_OutOfMemoryException_Test()
        {
            Action TestMethod = () => { throw new OutOfMemoryException(); };

            try
            {
                TestMethod();
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                if (ex.GetType().IsAnyOf(
                    typeof(OutOfMemoryException),
                    typeof(StackOverflowException)))
                    throw;

                /*else... Handle other exception types, typically by logging to file*/
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
If you're going to downvote, please comment as to what can be improved. –  Josh W Mar 1 at 19:05
add comment

As others have pointed out, you can have an if statement inside your catch block to determine what is going on. Announced at Build 2014, the next version will support Exception Filters, so the following will work:

try { … }
catch (MyException e) if (myfilter(e))
{
    …
}

You can download the preview of Roslyn now to check this out.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Design an exception inheritance hierarchy for your application.

share|improve this answer
12  
Abandoning all the perfectly sane and useful Exception .net provides (ArgumentException, InvalidOperationException etc.) for the sake of being able to catch "MyApplicationBaseException" seems to offer a bad cost/benefit relation. Also, it won't help me if I want to catch exceptions thrown by string.Format and other Framework methods. –  Michael Stum Jul 15 '11 at 1:05
2  
@MichaelStum +1 on your comment above. But aren't you looking to abandon all the perfectly sane and useful exception handling syntax provided to elegantly catch multiple exceptions? That you want to execute an identical body of code as a result of differing conditions is pretty much the use-case for a method call. But we don't try to group-together (in potentially obscure if/then blocks) all the other pre-cursors to a particular method call in other parts of our program, so should we do it here? Not arguin', just philosophisin' (in fact I came here as I had the same question as you)! ;-) –  Sepster Oct 23 '12 at 13:53
    
@MichaelStum: The .net exception hierarchy may be sane and useful from the standpoint of a human identifying things, but it seems pretty useless from the standpoint of deciding how far the stack needs to be unwound when a problem occurs. For example, if a user selects "Open..." and picks a file that can't be parsed, how should the outer application layer identify which exceptions should simply say "File cannot be opened", and which ones indicate the application as a whole is corrupt and needs to shut down? –  supercat Dec 16 '12 at 4:57
add comment

A little mind twister, probably not for real life use, posting here just for the sake of having another option and seeing how ugly it is

   catch (Exception ex)            
   {                
       if (ex is FormatException ||
           ex is OverflowException) 
       {} else throw;

       WebId = Guid.Empty;
   }
share|improve this answer
7  
-1: convoluted version of accepted answer, with no added value. –  ANeves Jan 10 '11 at 19:24
    
You get less nesting - so called exit early strategy. But I must confess I would never write such code in real life. I posted it just for the sake of having more alternatives. –  Konstantin Spirin Jan 11 '11 at 2:09
2  
Spirit, seems to me you have the same amount of nesting, but with less readibility. :( Did you mean if (!ex is FormatException && !ex is OverflowException){ throw; } WebId = Guid.Empty; ? (And doesn't exit early imply using return? Maybe not.) –  ANeves Jan 27 '11 at 13:52
add comment

Note that I did find one way to do it, but this looks more like Material for TheDailyWTF:

            catch (Exception ex)
            {

                switch (ex.GetType().Name)
                {
                    case "System.FormatException":
                    case "System.OverflowException":
                        WebId = Guid.Empty;
                        break;
                    default:
                        throw;                           
                }
            }
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3  
-1 vote, +5 WTF :-) This should not have been marked as an answer, but it is he-larious. –  Aaron Sep 25 '08 at 21:23
1  
it's not marked as answer, it's in that fuzzy blue color because i'm the one who asked the question :) the Answer is green. –  Michael Stum Sep 25 '08 at 21:32
13  
good grief..... –  Adam Ralph Sep 24 '10 at 7:38
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