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I want to compare two tuples that contain doubles as efficient as possible.

Since this can not be done by using the predefined operator==(...) because of floating point precision, what would be the best way? Do I really need to loop over all the tuples elements or is there some template magic I could use, which might allow the compiler to invoke some SIMD optimisations?

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closed as not a real question by ecatmur, Pascal Cuoq, WhozCraig, Fraser, Graviton Dec 24 '12 at 4:19

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
As efficient as possible involves some form of operator ==. You seem to have other requirements ("because of floating point precision") but somehow believe your sole requirements are efficiency. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 28 '12 at 11:02
    
You should probably try to solve this problem correctly, as this is not an easy task with doubles, and after you have that analyze it and try to make it more efficient (if possible at all) –  PlasmaHH Nov 28 '12 at 11:05
    
Efficiency is only one concern. The other is that the datasets are being read from a file which is why operator==() is pretty much out of the question. –  Matthias Holzapfel Nov 28 '12 at 11:06
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Um, why does reading from a file mean that equality can't be tested? –  Pete Becker Nov 28 '12 at 14:44
    
Some values are only being read, others may be calculated, others my be typed in by user. So I guess my question should be something like "How to use a custom equality operator for certain types in a tuple" –  Matthias Holzapfel Nov 29 '12 at 13:11

2 Answers 2

It is a misconception that comparing floating-point values for equality is impaired. In any implementation that is not horribly broken, comparing floating-point values for equality returns true if and only if the values compared are equal.

Any actual errors lie earlier in your computation. Those errors must be controlled and characterized. Without a characterization of the errors, it is impossible to make any recommendations about what operations to perform that would suit your purposes.

If you have values that have been computed inexactly, so that they may contain some errors, and you wish to accept as equal values that are actually unequal, then you must state (a) a criterion for accepting equality, and (b) a criterion for rejecting equality. When those criteria have been stated, then people might be able to give you recommendations about implementing a test that satisfies both criteria. Note that (b) is important as well as (a), because you generally do not wish to accept as equal values that are actually unequal. Because there are errors in your computations, some of the decisions will be wrong, and you must determine the criteria (a) and (b) so that the incorrect decisions are acceptable for your application. It is important that (a) and (b) not overlap, or there will be cases in which no decision is acceptable.

In your case, you have stated no source of errors other than reading data from a file. If the data in the file is the result of floating-point computations written by good software (that correctly converts floating-point values to decimal numerals with sufficient precision), and you read it with good software (that correctly converts decimal numerals to floating-point values), then there is no error in this round-trip of data, and you should simply test for equality with no embellishments.

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Ok, based on the STL implementation of operator== () for tuple I created this, which allows me to use whatever comparison function I want for certain types:

template<class T>
bool
tupleEqualHelper (const T& lhs, const T& rhs)
{
  return lhs == rhs;
}

template<>
bool tupleEqualHelper<double> (const double& lhs, const double& rhs)
{
 return return (fabs (lhs - rhs) < (std::numeric_limits<double>::epsilon () * 100));
}

template<counter_t i, counter_t j, class T>
struct compareHelper;

template<counter_t i, counter_t j, class T>
struct compareHelper
{
  static bool tupleEqual (const T& lhs, const T & rhs)
  {
    return tupleEqualHelper (std::get<i > (lhs), std::get<i > (rhs)) &&
            compareHelper < i + 1, j, T>::tupleEqual (lhs, rhs);
  }
};

template<counter_t i, class T>
struct compareHelper<i, i, T>
{
  static bool tupleEqual (const T&, const T&)
  {
    return true;
  }
};

template<class ... TTypes>
bool
compareTuple (const std::tuple<TTypes...>& lhs, const std::tuple<TTypes...>& rhs)
{
  typedef std::tuple < TTypes...> Tp;

  return compareHelper < 0, std::tuple_size<Tp>::value, Tp>::tupleEqual (lhs, rhs);
}
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