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Because I believe it is a good programming practica, I make all my (local or instance) variables final if they are written only once.

However, I notice that when a variable assignment can throw an exception you cannot make said variable final:

final int x;
try {
    x = Integer.parseInt("someinput");
}
catch(NumberFormatException e) {
    x = 42;  // Compiler error: The final local variable x may already have been assigned
}

Is there a way to do this without resorting to a temporary variable? (or is this not the right place for a final modifier?)

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1  
I doubt you can do this without a temporary variable. –  NPE Nov 28 '12 at 11:35
6  
final int x = makeX(); definitely. (try-catch in function) –  Joop Eggen Nov 28 '12 at 11:36
    
Shocking that the JDK still doesn't have a tryParse. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 28 '12 at 11:41
    
@T.J.Crowder definitly, but it is irrelevant in this case since I just used the integer as an example –  dtech Nov 28 '12 at 11:43
    
@dtech: I figured. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 28 '12 at 11:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

One way to do this is by introducing a (non-final) temporary variable, but you said you didn't want to do that.

Another way is to move both branches of the code into a function:

final int x = getValue();

private int getValue() {
  try {
    return Integer.parseInt("someinput");
  }
  catch(NumberFormatException e) {
    return 42;
  }
}

Whether or not this is practical depends on the exact use case.

All in all, as long as x is a an appropriately-scoped local variable, the most practical general approach might be to leave it non-final.

If, on the other hand, x is a member variable, my advice would be to use a non-final temporary during initialization:

public class C {
  private final int x;
  public C() {
    int x_val;
    try {
      x_val = Integer.parseInt("someinput");
    }
    catch(NumberFormatException e) {
      x_val = 42;
    }
    this.x = x_val;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For a local scope I agree with you, however this most often occurs with instance variables. –  dtech Nov 28 '12 at 11:45
    
I guess it could reflect an error cannot make a static reference to the non-static method getValue(), so we are suppose to use the static function ,, i may be wrong private static int getValue() ..@NPE –  The Ranger Nov 28 '12 at 11:45

No it is not the right place, imagine you got more then 1 Statement in your try and catch block, the first one says : x = 42. After some others Statements the try block fails, and it goes to the catch block, where your Saying x = 30. Now you defined x twice.

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1  
The compiler is smart enough to know which statements throw which exceptions. It may not be possible in all cases but just like the compiler can tell you in some cases about dead code etc. it should be able to figure out if final would work. –  Stefan Feb 18 at 17:43

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