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I'm trying to this:

$("a[rel=popover]").popover({
    html:       true,
    trigger:    'hover',
    content:    '<img src="'+$(this).data('img')+'" />'
});

but it doesn't work because the $(this).data('img') doesn't work.

Why I do this, I've got conflicts with templating and html in the data-content attribute. So I place the image source in a data-img attribue and like to grab that en place it into a img element.

I've tried this, but works not fully:

$("a[rel=popover_img]").popover({
    html:       true,
    trigger:    'hover',
    content:    '<img src="#" id="popover_img" />'
}).hover(function(){
    $('#popover_img').attr('src',$(this).data('img'));
});

I hope somebody can help me out :)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 21 down vote accepted

As it currently stands your this is referencing the current scope, whereas you want to be referencing the element which the Popover instance is attached to. This is done simply by wrapping the expression you have for content in a function:

$('a[rel=popover]').popover({
  html: true,
  trigger: 'hover',
  content: function () {
    return '<img src="'+$(this).data('img') + '" />';
  }
});

See demo:

Plunker

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That did the trick! –  Roy Nov 29 '12 at 10:27
    
Is a popover limitation when i tried to show a bigger image? like 500x500px, the popover border did not surrounded the image. –  Khrys Sep 17 '13 at 13:26
    
@Khrys Yes. Bootstrap has the default: .popover { max-width: 276px; }. However, it also has img { width: 100%; } which should scale the popover content accordingly. The problem you described must be coming from conflicting CSS, or customizations. –  merv Sep 18 '13 at 21:15
    
@merv, in the example you posted in Plunker the first image has 400x200, but the popover isn't allowing it to be at this resolution... the side image is 200x100 and shows as the same visual size. Should the first one be visually bigger? thx –  Khrys Sep 19 '13 at 11:39
    
@Khrys The width: 100% CSS indicates that the width of the image should be scaled to fit its parent container. So, no, it shouldn't be bigger; it's behaving as designed. –  merv Sep 20 '13 at 1:03

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