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I have a text coming in as

A1:B2.C3.D4.E5
A2:B7.C10.D0.E9
A0:B1.C9.D4.E8

I wonder how to change it as

A1:B2.C1.D4.E5
A2:B7.C8.D0.E9
A0:B1.C7.D4.E8

using Awk. First problem is multiple delimiter. Second is, how to get the C-Value and Decrement by 2.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

awk solution:

$ awk -F"." '{$2=substr($2,0,1)""substr($2,2)-2;}1' OFS="." file
A1:B2.C1.D4.E5
A2:B7.C8.D0.E9
A0:B1.C7.D4.E8
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Looks like yours is solaris. Use nawk in place of awk. –  Guru Nov 28 '12 at 13:28
    
Yes. Found it later that this works using nawk. Thanks a lot. –  R Kaja Mohideen Nov 28 '12 at 13:37
1  
On Solaris use /usr/xpg4/bin/awk rather than nawk as it has more POSIX functionality. Your awks of choice should be, in order: gawk, /usr/xpg4/bin/awk, nawk. Never use /usr/bin/awk (aka old, broken awk). –  Ed Morton Nov 28 '12 at 14:05

I was wondering wether awk regexp would do the job, but apparently, awk cannot capture pattern. This is why I suggest perl solution:

$ cat data.txt 
A1:B2.C3.D4.E5
A2:B7.C10.D0.E9
A0:B1.C9.D4.E8
$ perl -pe 's/C([0-9]+)/"C" . ($1-2)/ge;' data.txt
A1:B2.C1.D4.E5
A2:B7.C8.D0.E9
A0:B1.C7.D4.E8
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awk CAN capture the string that matches an RE, just not in as brief a code as perl or sed. See match()/substr() and gensub(). –  Ed Morton Nov 28 '12 at 13:48
    
thanks @EdMorton –  Aif Nov 28 '12 at 15:06

Admittedly, I probably would have done this using the substr() function like Guru has shown:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="." } { $2 = substr($2,0,1) substr($2,2) - 2 }1' file

I do also like Aif's answer using Perl probably just a little more. Shorter is sweeter, isn't it? However, GNU awk can capture pattens. Here's how:

awk 'BEGIN { FS=OFS="." } match($2, /(C)(.*)/, a) { $2 = a[1] a[2] - 2}1' file
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1  
+1 for the solutions. wrt the "shorter is sweeter" statement, though - brevity is not a desirable quality of software, conciseness is. perl solutions are often brief but rarely clear so they're usually not concise. –  Ed Morton Nov 28 '12 at 14:08

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