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I'm currently trying to make a C# API visible in COM and I'm currently stuck on making the non generic GetEnumerator method visible in COM for classes that also inherit IEnumerable<T>. If I implement another method on the ITestIEnumerable, it is visible. I've also found that non generic GetEnumerator methods are visible on classes that derive from Lists.

I don't really understand why this isn't working, it seems to be a special case for classes that inherit IEnumerable<T>. Is there anyway to expose this to COM so I can use the For Each construct in VB6?

For example

[ClassInterface(ClassInterfaceType.AutoDual)]
[ProgId("Test")]
[Guid("1aa2bdec-0530-44e8-b62d-b75914a6de22")]
public class TestIEnumerable : ITestIEnumerable
{
    #region IEnumerable<Item> Members

    [ComVisible(false)]
    public IEnumerator<Item> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _collection.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion

    #region ITestIEnumerable Members

    [DispId(-4)]
    [ComVisible(true)]
    IEnumerator ITestIEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _collection.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion

    #region IEnumerable Members

    [DispId(-4)]
    [ComVisible(true)]
    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return _collection.GetEnumerator();
    }

    #endregion
}

[InterfaceType(ComInterfaceType.InterfaceIsDual)]
[Guid("187f3fed-9d4a-4a52-9a7c-a2fdeb56b9fa")]
[ComImport]
public interface ITestIEnumerable : IEnumerable<Item>
{
    [DispId(-4)]
    [ComVisible(true)]
    new IEnumerator GetEnumerator();
}
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1  
You are helping too much. Remove ITestIEnumerable and just have the class implement IEnumerable<> –  Hans Passant Nov 28 '12 at 13:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can't have more than one public method of the same name with the same signature. As such, two of your GetEnumerator methods are being implemented using explicit interface implementation:

IEnumerator ITestIEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
{
}

As such, they're treated as private members - it's not even visible to other .NET code unless that code casts your TestIEnumerable object to ITestIEnumerable.

So, decide which one of your GetEnumerator() methods you wish to expose, and make it public:

public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
{
}

And switch the generic one to an explicit implementation:

IEnumerator<Item> IEnumerable<Item>.GetEnumerator()
{
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know about COM, but in regular .NET it would be more common to expose the generic version on the public API, and keep the non-generic version as the explicit implementation - as per the OP's original code –  Marc Gravell Nov 28 '12 at 12:12
    
@MarcGravell - I think I'd agree with you there - if you're building something for both .NET and COM users, I'd probably make a more conventional .NET class and then some facade classes to expose the functionality to COM as required. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 28 '12 at 13:12
    
Thanks guys, the solution was to remove the interface and make the IEnumerator GetEnumerator() public. Solved. –  Bill Duncan Nov 28 '12 at 14:55

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