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Given the following scenario where my data might be of different type based on some condition.

class myClass {
public:
    myclass() {
        if (condition1) {
          bool boolValue = false;
          data = boolValue;
        } else if (condition2) {
          int intValue = 0;
          data = intValue;
        } else if (condition3) {
          unsigned int unsignedIntValue = 0;
          data = unsignedIntValue;
        } else if (condition4) {
          long longValue = 0;
          data = longValue;
        } else if (condition5) {
          double doubleValue = 0.0;
          data = doubleValue;
        } else if (condition6) {
          float floatValue = 0.0;
          data = floatValue;
        } else if (condition7) {
          char *buffer = new char[10];
          data = buffer;
        }
    }

    void* getData() const { return data; }

private:
    void *data;
}

As it happens the value that my void pointer points to is strictly within each statement. Therefore what is returned with getData() might not be valid. If I do get the data it is simply because the memory location where I point to is not yet written over.

The solution I have come up with is this:

class myClass {
public:
    myclass() {
        if (condition1) {
          boolValue = false;
          data = boolValue;
        } else if (condition2) {
          intValue = 0;
          data = intValue;
        } else if (condition3) {
          unsignedIntValue = 0;
          data = unsignedIntValue;
        } else if (condition4) {
          longValue = 0;
          data = longValue;
        } else if (condition5) {
          doubleValue = 0.0;
          data = doubleValue;
        } else if (condition6) {
          floatValue = 0.0;
          data = floatValue;
        } else if (condition7) {
          buffer = new char[10];
          data = buffer;
        }
    }

    void* getData() const { return data; }

private:
    void *data;
    bool boolValue;
    int intValue;
    unsigned int unsignedIntValue;
    long longValue;
    double doubleValue;
    float floatValue;
    char *buffer;
}


I was thinking there must be a more elegant way to do this. Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
6  
Have you looked at boost::variant? – R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 28 '12 at 11:56
    
You should probably use Python. Using a language like C++ with a strict type system only to cheat around the type system is using the wrong tool. There's a good reason why different types are different types. – Damon Nov 28 '12 at 11:56
    
There is probably a better way to do it, but without more context, it's impossible to say what that might be. From what you've shown, the void pointer looks wholly unnecessary and could just be removed. I assume it serves a purpose, and that purpose dictates which implementation would solve the problem more elegantly – jalf Nov 28 '12 at 11:57
3  
yuck, +1 for boost::variant. Dont you dare casting types to void just to have one getData() function :-P fist to the sky and looking dissapointed at you. EDIT: or... use a template class :-)? – Najzero Nov 28 '12 at 11:59
    
Even if you didn't like templates or boost, surely you could have a top level Data class and pass around pointers to instances of that, and then use RTTI and dynamic_cast to try and convert it to IntData or BoolData subclasses, etc. – Rook Nov 28 '12 at 12:10

You could use a union to save a few bits in memory, and then use pointer casting to get the value from the union:

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

class myClass {
public:
    myClass(char *str){
        data.str = str;
    }
    myClass(double d){
        data.d = d;
    }
    myClass(float f){
        data.f = f;
    }

    void *getData() { return (void*)&data; }
private:
    union {
        double d;
        float f;
        char *str;
    } data;
};

int main(){
    myClass c(2.0);
    cout << *(double*)c.getData() << endl;

    myClass f(3.0f);
    cout << *(float*)f.getData() << endl;

    myClass s("test");
    cout << *(char**)s.getData() << endl;

    system("pause");
}

/* prints
2
3
test
*/
share|improve this answer

If you don't need to change the type of the data after you create an object, then you could use a template class:

template <typename T>
class myBaseClass {
public:
    // Declare common functions here.
    T getData()
    { return data; }

protected:
    T data;

protected:
    // Disallow constructing instances of this class outside the child classes.
    myBaseClass(T val) : data(val) { }
};

template <typename T>
class myClass: public myBaseClass<T> {
public:
    myClass() : myBaseClass<T>(0) { }
};

You then specialize for char*:

template <>
class myClass<char*>: public myBaseClass<char*> {
public:
    myClass() : myBaseClass(new char[10]) { }
};

You then create instances like this:

myClass<int> a;
myClass<float> b;
myClass<char*> c;
// etc.
int i = a.getData();
float f = b.getData();
char* str = c.getData();
share|improve this answer
    
Valid, but still kind of overcomplicated. – Bartek Banachewicz Nov 28 '12 at 12:46
    
@BartekBanachewicz Yeah, though performance is better than runtime type-switching and of course it's type safe. – Nikos C. Nov 28 '12 at 12:51

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