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I have the following hash of hashes:

my %MacroA = ('Category' => {}, 'Item' => {}, 'Description' => {}, 'Score' => {});

What I want is to loop through a file and then add new elements to the different hashes. Lets say the line contains "layout" i want to store it in 'Category' each time it sees it

What I have done is:

while (my $line = <$file>) {                                        

if ($line =~ /\b(layout)\b,/) { 
foreach my $categories (keys $MacroA{'Category'}) {
    $MacroA{Category} = $1;
}
}
share|improve this question
    
What is the expected value in %MacroA after meeting a line containing layout? –  choroba Nov 28 '12 at 12:16
    
%MacroA = 'Category' => 'layout' @choroba –  El_Commandantee Nov 28 '12 at 12:20
2  
Your question contains example code that is pretty much identical to the code in stackoverflow.com/questions/13566521/hash-of-hashes-perl. I don't know if you are the same user as TheBlackCorsair or that you just happen to be in the same class, but the question and answer in that post should help you. –  MattLBeck Nov 28 '12 at 13:16
    
yes it helps :) @kikumbob –  El_Commandantee Nov 28 '12 at 13:18

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Below is a complete program separated into different chunks. To run it, copy and paste the answer to a file named populate, but remove commentary sections such as this paragraph.

Nearly all Perl programs (especially while you are still a beginner) should start with

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

The first line tells the system how to execute your program. Enabling the strict and warnings pragmata will help you avoid common mistakes and help explain what your program is doing in cases where you see surprising behavior.

Based on your question, the data structure you want is an array of hashes. Each “row” or element of the array will correspond to a line in the input file and will have the form

# { Category => '...', Item => '...', Description => '...', Score => '...' }

The program will also read the column names from the input.

The code uses Perl’s “diamond operator” to read each line of input. chomp removes the trailing newline if present.

If the line tells us the header names (i.e., it starts with #), we store each field in @columns. The ucfirst bit may be unfamiliar: it uppercases the first character of a string. Because there are several column names, we use map to apply ucfirst to each.

Otherwise, the line represents a data row. We split the line into fields separated by commas and load them into a new hash. The push line adds a reference (created with the backslash before the hash) to the end of @MacroA.

my @MacroA;
my @columns;
while (<>) {
  chomp;

  if (s/^#//) {                               # / fix Stack Overflow coloring
    @columns = map ucfirst, split /\s*,\s*/;  # / ditto
  }
  else {
    my %row;
    @row{@columns} = split /,/;
    push @MacroA, \%row;
  }
}

Note that the splitting above is naïaut;ve. For processing general CSV input, use one of the CSV modules on CPAN.

The Data::Dumper module is useful for quickly printing the contents of a complex data structure. Stick it in your debugging toolbag.

use Data::Dumper;
$Data::Dumper::Indent = $Data::Dumper::Terse = 1;
print Dumper \@MacroA;

__END__

Given a file input with contents below

#category, item, description, score
layout,f.4,Macro placement clearance,pass
layout,f.14,No area congestion,pass
layout,f.17,placement collar diode,fail
layout,f.18,placement collar buffer,pass
layout,f.26,tie connection,fail
layout,f.28,CTS allowed cell,fail
layout,f.29,CTS allowed layed,pass
layout,f.31,Clock De-cap cell,fail
layout,f.33,Clock non default rule,fail

a sample run is below.

$ perl populate input
[
  {
    'Score' => 'pass',
    'Item' => 'f.4',
    'Description' => 'Macro placement clearance',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'pass',
    'Item' => 'f.14',
    'Description' => 'No area congestion',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'fail',
    'Item' => 'f.17',
    'Description' => 'placement collar diode',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'pass',
    'Item' => 'f.18',
    'Description' => 'placement collar buffer',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'fail',
    'Item' => 'f.26',
    'Description' => 'tie connection',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'fail',
    'Item' => 'f.28',
    'Description' => 'CTS allowed cell',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'pass',
    'Item' => 'f.29',
    'Description' => 'CTS allowed layed',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'fail',
    'Item' => 'f.31',
    'Description' => 'Clock De-cap cell',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  },
  {
    'Score' => 'fail',
    'Item' => 'f.33',
    'Description' => 'Clock non default rule',
    'Category' => 'layout'
  }
]
share|improve this answer

Your question is very confusingly-asked, but your problem appears to be because you're doing keys on a reference rather than a hash. Newer perls do support this, but you may be on an older version.

In your example $MacroA{'Category'} returns a hash reference, not a hash. You initialised the hash with 'Category' => {}, and {} is a reference to an empty anonymous hash.

To turn a hash reference into a hash, you use the %{ ... } notation; in this case you'd write keys %{ $MacroA{'Category'} }. Yes, this is ugly, which is why Perl was changed to support keys on a reference.

Note however that your next line is $MacroA{Category} = $1; which will replace the reference with whatever is in $1, probably the string "layout". That's not a reference, so the next time round the while loop, your script will keel over. You probably wanted to do a multi-level hash, something like $MacroA{Category}{$1} = $file or something like that, depending on what data you're wanting to build up in the hash, but it's not really clear what you're trying to achieve. The other answer suggesting hash-of-array may be what you desire. In this case, if using an older perl, the notation @{ ... } turns an array reference into an array that you can use with push.

share|improve this answer
    
@ Peter Corlett what im trying to achieve is that i have the followingfile: –  El_Commandantee Nov 28 '12 at 12:34
    
#category, item, description, score layout,f.4,Macro placement clearance,pass layout,f.14,No area congestion,pass layout,f.17,placement collar diode,fail layout,f.18,placement collar buffer,pass layout,f.26,tie connection,fail layout,f.28,CTS allowed cell,fail layout,f.29,CTS allowed layed,pass layout,f.31,Clock De-cap cell,fail layout,f.33,Clock non default rule,fail and i want to store "layout" each from each line to 'Description' –  El_Commandantee Nov 28 '12 at 12:37

It looks like you're trying to do a sort of named columns thing, here. This is pretty straight forward, if you know how to do it.

Going from your comment to Peter ( "[I] want to store "layout" each from each line to 'Description'") that's what this code allows you to do: store it.

Because the main case I see for a hash is the record itself, that's the only hash this demonstration uses. It stores them in an array. I don't really get how you want to index them from your example. And you seem a little confused about how you want to process them. Surely, it's not that useful to process every line with the 'layout' in it and then store that as the "Category" field.

use strict;
use warnings;

my @columns = qw<field1 field2 field3 field4>;
my @list;
my $fh = \*::DATA;
my $header = <$fh>;
if ( substr( $header, 0, 1 ) eq '#' ) {
    ( $header ) = $header =~ m/#(.*)/;
    $header =~ s/\s+$//; 
    @columns = split /,\s*/, $header;
}
else { 
    seek( $fh, 0, 0 ); # go back
}

# optional statement to capitalize field names
@columns = map { ucfirst } @columns;

while ( my $line = <$fh> ) { 
    next unless $line =~ m/^\s*layout\b/;
    $line =~ s/\s*$//;
    # store fields by hash slice in the tip of the array
    @{ $list[@list] }{ @columns } = split /,\s*/, $line;
}

__DATA__
#category, item, description, score 
layout,f.4,Macro placement clearance,pass 
layout,f.14,No area congestion,pass 
layout,f.17,placement collar diode,fail 
layout,f.18,placement collar buffer,pass 
layout,f.26,tie connection,fail 
layout,f.28,CTS allowed cell,fail 
layout,f.29,CTS allowed layed,pass 
layout,f.31,Clock De-cap cell,fail 
layout,f.33,Clock non default rule,fail

Although it's not everything you could want it to be, copying the record into an array is simple model of "processing it", we could do something like this instead:

my %by_item;
while ( my $line = <$fh> ) { 
    next unless $line =~ m/^\s*layout\b/;
    $line =~ s/\s*$//;
    my %h;
    @h{ @columns } = split /,\s*/, $line;
    $by_item{ $h{Item} } = \%h;
    ### OR 
    # push @{ $by_item{ $h{Item} } }, %h;
}

You could also do this:

my %by_field;
...
$by_field{Item}{ $h{Item} }               
    = $by_field{Description}{ $h{Description} } 
    = \%h
    ;
share|improve this answer

I think you need a hash of arrays instead:

my %MacroA = ('Category' => [], 'Item' => [], 'Description' => [], 'Score' => []);

while (my $line = <$file>) {                                        

if ($line =~ /\b(layout)\b,/) { 
foreach my $categories (keys $MacroA{'Category'}) {
    push $MacroA{Category}, $1;
}
}
share|improve this answer

Your question is confusing. Just adding 'layout' to the Category key is simple, no looping involved:

while (my $line = <$file>) {                                        
    if ($line =~ /\blayout\b,/) { 
        $MacroA{Category} = 'layout';
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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