Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have table a with two fields: id (PK) and f.

Consider following records:

id | f
1  | NULL
2  | 'foo'
3  | 'bar'
4  | NULL
5  | 'foo'
6  | 'baz'

I want to retrieve and count all the records having distinct f values including every record WHERE f IS NULL. Given this criteria, the query should return every record except #5, because the same value is already included in the set, and the total count would be 5.

The query I'm using to retrieve all records looks like this:

SELECT CASE WHEN EXISTS (SELECT id FROM a a2 WHERE a2.f = a.f AND a.id < a2.id) THEN 1 END AS not_distinct FROM a HAVING not_distinct IS NULL

If this query could be improved, I'd welcome any feedback. Anyway, the main problem is counting. Obviously adding a COUNT(*) will not help here and I'm totally lost how to count the records after the filtering.

share|improve this question
    
What result do you expect? –  eisberg Nov 28 '12 at 12:37
    
Can you please provide sample data you wish to get as o/p? –  Ajith Sasidharan Nov 28 '12 at 12:51
    
@AjithSasidharan: The question is already clear on that: the query should return every record except #5, because the same value is already included in the set, and the total count would be 5. –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 28 '12 at 13:14
    
Yes go the requirement now. –  Ajith Sasidharan Nov 28 '12 at 13:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use NOT EXISTS in a WHERE clause:

SELECT count(*)
FROM   a
WHERE  NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM a a2 WHERE a2.f = a.f AND a2.id < a.id);

This way you can also get actual rows - if you need more than the bare count:

SELECT *
FROM   a
WHERE  NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM a a2 WHERE a2.f = a.f AND a2.id < a.id)

The = operator makes sure that all rows with f IS NULL are included. You had that in your query already.

-> sqlfiddle

Neither of these would work:

SELECT DISTINCT f FROM a;

SELECT * FROM a GROUP BY f;

.. because both would also fold NULL values, and you want

every record WHERE f IS NULL.

share|improve this answer
    
This solution seems so obvious I wonder why I haven't figured it out myself. Thanks a lot, works beautifully. –  package Nov 28 '12 at 14:18
    
That's the thing with solutions: most seem so obvious once you have them. :) –  Erwin Brandstetter Nov 28 '12 at 15:55

There's a pretty simple approach that might work for you:

select count(distinct ifnull(f, id))
from a

Note that this query assumes that f values are never id values, and based on sample data and experience this is reasonable.

Edited:

I thought about it and there's an even simpler approach:

select count(distinct f) + sum(f is null) from a;

which you can see running on sqlfiddle

This works because distinct throws away nulls, and sum(condition) counts the number of times condition is true because in mysql true is 1 and false is 0.

share|improve this answer
    
Although your solution generally is better performance-wise, I chose Erwin's answer since it suits my needs better in current situation. Thanks anyway! –  package Nov 28 '12 at 14:20
    
@package See edited answer for another pretty simple approach that will perform well too, but is less "smarty pants". (btw, the answer you selected will always suck performance wise). –  Bohemian Nov 28 '12 at 18:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.