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When initializing a data structure, or object, which has sub objects requiring explicit release process after used, how should I handle an error during the initialization process?

Let me take an example, initializing an OBJECT object with SUBOBJ1 and SUBOBJ2 slots to be set foreign pointers to int values:

(defun init-object ()
  (let ((obj (make-object)))
    (setf (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int)
          (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int))
    obj))

If we had an error in FOREIGN-ALLOCing for SUBOBJ2 slot, we should do FOREIGN-FREEing for SUBOBJ1 slot to avoid memory leaking.

As an idea, I can write as below:

(defun init-object ()
  (let ((obj (make-object)))
    (handler-case
        (setf (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int)
              (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int))
      (condition (c)   ; forcedly handling all conditions
        (when (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj1 obj)))
        (error c)))    ; invoke the condition c again explicitly
    obj))

Do you have any better idea, or generally idiomatic pattern?

Thanks


Following the answers, I add a code using UNWIND-PROTECT. It would not work because the deallocating forms run even if all allocation are completed successfully.

(defun init-object ()
  (let ((obj (make-object)))
    (unwind-protect
      (progn
        (setf (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int)
              (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int))
        obj)
      ; foreign pointers freed even when successfully initialized
      (when (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj2 obj)))
      (when (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj1 obj))))))
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Common Lisp has the facilities that correspond to today's languages (e.g. Java, C#) exception and resource management statements, such as try with catch and/or finally.

The try-catch in Common Lisp is achieved with handler-case, as you have in your code. It's possible to simply resignal the same error back, but you won't then catch the error on the debugger where it actually happened. Java includes the stacktrace of the exception when it's created. C# includes the stacktrace of the exception when it's thrown. In any case, I think both have ways to throw a new exception with an inner exception, so you can get to the original stacktrace.

The try-finally in Common Lisp is achieved with unwind-protect. The first form is executed normally, and the rest are executed unconditionally whether the first form returns normally or not.

Common Lisp has a facility which allows running code at the point where an error is signaled, which is handler-bind. The main difference regarding handler-case is that it doesn't rewind the stack and it doesn't prevent the error from popping up to other handlers or the debugger, if no handler exited non-locally.

Thus, you'd use something like this:

(defun init-object ()
  (let ((obj (make-object)))
    (handler-bind
        (;; forcedly handling all conditions
         (condition #'(lambda (c)
                        (declare (ignore c))
                        (when (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj1 obj)))
                        ;; return normally, allowing the condition to go up the handler chain
                        ;; and possibly to the debugger, if none exits non-locally
                        )))
      (setf (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int)
            (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int)))
    obj))

I advise you against matching with condition, as all conditions inherit from it, such as storage-condition. You may not want to do anything on conditions you can't or won't possibly recover from.


Just for reference, the full try-catch-finally clause in Common Lisp is achieved with unwind-protect around handler-case:

(unwind-protect
     (handler-case
         (do-something)
       (error-type-1 ()
         (foo))
       (error-type-2 (e)
         (bar e)))
  (cleanup-form-1)
  (cleanup-form-2))
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, HANDLER-BIND is what I want. I will check detailed description on it and use it with matching with CONDITION. –  masayuki takagi Nov 30 '12 at 2:51
    
Clean up forms are evaluated only when some errors occurring, even so, the condition cascading process is not prevented –  masayuki takagi Nov 30 '12 at 3:09
    
@masayukitakagi, exactly. The notes in the CLHS entry for handler-case shows an equivalent implementation using handler-bind where control is first transferred non-locally, thus preventing the signal from going up the handler chain, requiring a new call to signal/error. –  Paulo Madeira Nov 30 '12 at 9:42
1  
@masayukitakagi, note that because the handler executes when and where the error is signaled, you may want to use (unwind-protect (prog2 (setf ...) obj (setf success t)) (when (not success) (free ...))). This will only deallocate when the frame is actually unwound. –  Paulo Madeira Nov 30 '12 at 23:59
    
This suggestion is nice because when entering the debugger, the state of the program is not changed. Using handler-bind can be a bit confusing because the state of the program is changed before entering the debugger. –  tuscland Nov 25 '13 at 21:51

Use UNWIND-PROTECT. When the error causes an exit out of the scope, unwind-protect allows you to force the execution of clean-up forms.

Something like this:

(defun init-object ()
  (let ((obj (make-object)))
    (unwind-protect
        (setf (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int)
              (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int))
      (unless (and (subobj2 obj) (subobj1 obj))
        (when (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj1 obj)))
        (when (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj2 obj)))))
    obj))

Use whatever is available to detect if a slot is bound or not. Above assumes that a non-initialized slot has a value of NIL.

share|improve this answer
    
UNWIND-PROTECT does not suit in this case, because the FOREIGN-ALLOCed values allocated successfully must be used after init-object. For releasing the object, or release-object, UNWIND-PROTECT works well. –  masayuki takagi Nov 28 '12 at 12:57
    
I would check in the UNWIND-PROTECT protected clause if the init was successful, and if not deallocate everything allocated. If your code signals appropriate errors (in all cases), then writing a handler is fine. If you want some luxury, you could write a macro (with-checked-foreign-allocation (obj ....), which provides a linguistic construct. –  Rainer Joswig Nov 28 '12 at 15:44
    
Can I ask more detail? I added a code using UNWIND-PROTECT in the question. What you mean is like that? –  masayuki takagi Nov 29 '12 at 0:09
    
@masayuki takagi: more detail above... –  Rainer Joswig Nov 30 '12 at 10:55

There have been suggestions to use UNWIND-PROTECT. That is the idiomatic way to deal with resource allocation. However, if your goal here is to deallocate resources on error, but return those resources if everything succeeded, you can use the something like the following:

(defun init-object ()
  (let ((obj (create-object)))
    (handler-case
        (progn
          (setf (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int))
          (setf (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-alloc :int))
          obj)
      (error (condition)
        (free-object obj)
        ;; Re-throw the error up in the call chain
        (error condition)))))

(defun free-object (obj)
  (when (subobj2 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj2 obj)))
  (when (subobj1 obj) (cffi:foreign-free (subobj1 obj))))

Another way of achieving the same thing is to have a check that verifies that the end of the function has been reached, and free the object if not. However, I don't really like that style since it doesn't really show very well exactly what is going on.

Note, however, that when you use the function INIT-OBJECT you need to enclose it in UNWIND-PROTECT. Otherwise you will be leaking resources once the object returned by the function is GC'ed.

The way to do this is is to always do the following when using the function:

(let ((obj (init-object)))
  (unwind-protect
      ... use object here ...
    (free-object obj)))

Another solution is to free the object when it's being GC'ed. There is no standard way of doing it, but the necessary functionality is abstracted in the TRIVIAL-GARBAGE:FINALIZE function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Your first approach is same as mine. Your second is what I'm going to try just now, and it works well (but, as you say, not very well style because of the check if the end of the function has been reached). Of course, I enclose codes in which an allocated object is used in UNWIND-PROTECT. No problem. On TRIVIAL-GARBAGE:FINALIZE, I think it is good as another approach. –  masayuki takagi Nov 29 '12 at 13:07
    
Am I too nervous in this topic? –  masayuki takagi Nov 29 '12 at 13:08
    
I don't think so. It's a good thing to think about, because it helps you understand the lifecycle of objects. Once you're comfortable with it, you'll be able to write this kind of code without thinking much. –  Elias Mårtenson Nov 29 '12 at 15:17
    
Ok, I think lifecycle of objects should be considered strictly, so want to make some patterns to be applied in this kind of situation. –  masayuki takagi Nov 30 '12 at 2:56

I second Rainer's suggestion: I wrap an unwind-protect form in a macro and check if the initialization succeeded in the protected clause.

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