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I have just been given access to a new Windows Web Server 2008 R2 which has SQL Server 2008 R2 installed on it. When I open up SQL Server Management Studio and try to connect, it does so with Windows Authentication, however, it does not ask me for a password, and it successfully connects.

I am worried that (hopefully not) someone who shouldn't be accessing the server does so, and can then easily connect to SQL Server Management Studio without even being asked for a password, and then have access to the databases.

What would be the best approach here to ensure that anyone who wants access to my databases, must enter a password?

I know I can create user accounts inside SQL Server and assign users to specific databases (SQL Server Authentication), but this doesn't get around the issue of an anonymous user just selected Windows Authentication type, enter no password, and have full access to my databases.

Can someone please advice this on this?

Thanks folks.

Update

Maybe I should not have stated the user in the above example as 'Anonymous', a better description is, someone who has stolen the Windows Web Server login details. They now are logged onto the Web Server, and because the login details they used identify that user the privileges to access SQL Server with Windows Authentication (no password needed), they can then access the databases and data.

If this scenario occurs, is there anything I can do to prevent the User from accessing SQL Server, ie, can I set a password for Windows Authentication?

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closed as off topic by Will A, Damien_The_Unbeliever, C. A. McCann, Paul R, Matteo Nov 28 '12 at 15:05

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That "anonymous user" already has access to your machine using a windows account, probably one with administrative privileges. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Nov 28 '12 at 13:21
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever Please see my updated question –  tgriffiths Nov 28 '12 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, you can't set a password for windows authentication.

It used to be that, by default, any user who is a Windows administrator on the machine was also a sysadmin on SQL Server, but that hasn't been the case (except for Express editions) since 2005. However, during setup, it will insist on adding at least one windows user as an sa. Commonly, this will be the user who is installing SQL Server (who will have to be an admin on the box).

Under either of these setups, the only windows accounts that can access the server automatically are accounts that are already administrators on the box. You've already lost control if someone has administrator access. All other windows accounts have no access unless you grant it.

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Thanks for this. –  tgriffiths Nov 28 '12 at 14:54

I know I can create user accounts inside SQL Server and assign users to specific databases (SQL Server Authentication), but this doesn't get around the issue of an anonymous user just selected Windows Authentication type, enter no password, and have full access to my databases.

That's not what's happened here - it's not anonymous. You have used windows authentication (Kerberos) which is checking that the account you are signed into windows with has access to the server.

Under the security tab in SQL Server, you will see a list of accounts that are allowed to authenticate with the server. Your account, or a group you are a member of, will be listed here - this is why SQL Server allowed you to connect and view the databases.

You can lock down this section of SQL so that only members of say 'Administrators' group are allowed to connect and are members of the sysadmin role which allows any action on the server.

You can lock down access to specific databases in the same way, adding groups \ roles and assigning windows credentials to them.

This way, only users that are allowed to connect to the server and are a member of the database role will be able to view your data

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Please see my updated question –  tgriffiths Nov 28 '12 at 14:14

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