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I need to traverse a list and do some calculations with every element and the elements excluding that element. For example, having a list (1 2 3 1), I need pairs (1) (2 3 1), (2) (1 3 1), (3) (1 2 1) and (1) (2 3 1).

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1  
How should the exclusion work? Exclude only the element at this index, or also every other that is equal to it? –  Rafał Dowgird Nov 28 '12 at 14:30
    
Can the list have multiple elements? If so, some of the answers below need to take this into account. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7662447/… –  noahlz Nov 28 '12 at 20:50
    
Should exclude only element at a given index. Updated the question. –  danas.zuokas Nov 30 '12 at 7:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

(...) with every element and the elements excluding that element.

With every element sounds like a map. Excluding that element sounds like a filter. Let's start with the latter.

user=> (filter #(not= % 1) '(1 2 3))
(2 3)

Great. Now let's try to map it over all elements.

user=> (let [coll '(1 2 3)] (map (fn [elem] (filter #(not= % elem) coll)) coll))
((2 3) (1 3) (1 2))

Creating actual pairs is left as an exercise for the reader. Hint: modify the closure used in map.

Keep in mind that the solution suggested above should work fine for short lists but it has a complexity of O(n²). Another issue is the fact that collections with duplicates aren't handled correctly.

Let's take a recursive approach instead. We'll base the recursion on loop and recur.

(defn pairs [coll]
  (loop [ahead coll behind [] answer []]
    (if (empty? ahead)
      answer
      (let [[current & remaining] ahead]
        (recur remaining
               (conj behind current)
               (conj answer [(list current)
                             (concat behind remaining)]))))))

A trivial example:

user=> (pairs '(1 2 3))
[[(1) (2 3)] [(2) (1 3)] [(3) (1 2)]]

A vector with duplicates:

user=> (pairs [1 5 6 5])
[[(1) (5 6 5)] [(5) (1 6 5)] [(6) (1 5 5)] [(5) (1 5 6)]]
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Since map and filter are both lazy, it's only going to be O(n^2) if you realize all the lists. And that's going to be O(n^2) regardless. –  Alex Nov 28 '12 at 18:01
    
What if you have a list with duplicates? Then filter will remove multiple elements. I would go with @skuro's answer instead. –  noahlz Nov 28 '12 at 20:48
    
@noahz, thanks, good point, I've revised the answer. A kind request to the downvoter: could you please take time to reread the revised answer and share your thoughts? –  Jan Nov 28 '12 at 21:14
    
actually, my solution was also removing the duplicates. I updated it to provide a duplicate safe version –  skuro Nov 29 '12 at 11:51
    
This is similar to the approach had in mind to handle duplicates - the only thing I might do differently is pull out the loop/recur into a helper fn and wrap the recursive calls in a lazy-seq to avoid computing the whole thing at once. –  Alex Nov 29 '12 at 16:09

Seems a job for a list comprehension:

(defn gimme-pairs [coll]
  (for [x coll]
    [(list x) (remove #{x} coll)]))

user=> (gimme-pairs [1 2 3])
([(1) (2 3)] [(2) (1 3)] [(3) (1 2)])

I would actually skip creating a list for the single element, which would make the code even easier:

(defn gimme-pairs [coll]
  (for [x coll]
    [x (remove #{x} coll)]))

user=> (gimme-pairs [1 2 3])
([1 (2 3)] [2 (1 3)] [3 (1 2)])

If you need to keep duplicates then you can use an indexed collection:

(defn gimme-pairs [coll]
  (let [indexed (map-indexed vector coll)
        remove-index (partial map second)]
    (for [[i x] indexed]
      [x (remove-index (remove #{[i x]} indexed))])))

user=> (gimme-pairs [1 2 3 1])
([1 (2 3 1)] [2 (1 3 1)] [3 (1 2 1)] [1 (1 2 3)])
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+1 on the idiomatic use of #{x} as a predicate in the first example. –  Alex Nov 29 '12 at 16:10
(def l [1 2 3])

(first (reduce (fn [[res ll] e]
                 [(conj res [(list e) (rest ll)])
                  (conj (vec (rest ll)) e)])
               [[] l] l))
=> [[(1) (2 3)] [(2) (3 1)] [(3) (1 2)]]
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The solution sorts lists and I want to keep the original order. –  danas.zuokas Nov 30 '12 at 7:14

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