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This is the code to calculate 1000th power of 2.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    double multiply = 1;
    int i;
    for(i = 1; i <= 1000; i++) {
        multiply *= 2;
    }
    printf("%lf\n", multiply);
    return 0;
}

And the output on my system, as well as ideone

10715086071862673209484250490600018105614048117055336074437503883703510511249361224931983788156958581275946729175531468251871452856923140435984577574698574803934567774824230985421074605062371141877954182153046474983581941267398767559165543946077062914571196477686542167660429831652624386837205668069376

which is exactly the right answer:

irb(main):001:0> 10715086071862673209484250490600018105614048117055336074437503883703510511249361224931983788156958581275946729175531468251871452856923140435984577574698574803934567774824230985421074605062371141877954182153046474983581941267398767559165543946077062914571196477686542167660429831652624386837205668069376 == 2 ** 1000
=> true
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Note that printf %lf is wrong; it should be %f. –  melpomene Nov 28 '12 at 13:40
2  
@melpomene %lf is correct for double multiply. –  ams Nov 28 '12 at 13:40
    
Chapter and verse? –  melpomene Nov 28 '12 at 13:41
    
Maybe you can store your result in a string, and print it. –  Alberto Bonsanto Nov 28 '12 at 14:07
1  
@melpomene: C 1999 7.19.6.1 7: “ l (ell) … has no effect on a following a, A, e, E, f, F, g, or G conversion specifier.” –  Eric Postpischil Nov 28 '12 at 14:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 15 down vote accepted

According to IEEE 754, floats etc. are stored in a 2-power format: sign, mantissa and exponent for base 2.

So 2^1000 is, simply spoken, stored with a mantissa of exactly 1 and an exponent of 1000.

If you would add 2, the value isn't correct any longer.

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Ah. Makes sense. –  user1527166 Nov 28 '12 at 13:41
1  
Yes a double can store up to 52 binary digits of a number, but there can be up to 2^10 zeros in front or behind those digits. –  ams Nov 28 '12 at 13:43
2  
@ams: The exponent range of normal 64-bit IEEE-754 binary floating-point numbers is -1022 to 1023. There is also an implicit leading 1 bit. So, if you want to convert a floating-point representation to binary, you may have 53 bits followed by up to 971 zeroes (not 2^10) or a period followed by up to 1021 (also not 2^10) zeroes followed by 53 bits, or a period in the middle of 53 bits. –  Eric Postpischil Nov 28 '12 at 16:56
    
@EricPostpischil: Thanks for adding the details. :) –  ams Nov 29 '12 at 13:12

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