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if a == arg:
    if arg not in a_list:
        do_something(arg)
elif b == arg:
    if arg not in b_list:
        do_something(arg)
else:
    do_something_else(arg)

Propose an idiomatic way to shorten and specifically DRY above statements - without extracting parts of it to separate functions.

edit: Funny ;-) This not a homework assignment neither is this a request to review my code, perhaps if I reframe above as below my intentions become more clear:

What is a pythonian way to write above if-statements such that it is both DRY and idiomatic to the language? I feel I am missing something, perhaps one can make use of the and/or operators in python? Reason for not extracting any parts of it to separate functions is that then this question is more about refactoring than about idiomatic pythonian if-logic.

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closed as not a real question by Martijn Pieters, Blair, ekhumoro, Lafada, evilone Nov 29 '12 at 5:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
what's the course name? –  Samuele Mattiuzzo Nov 28 '12 at 14:23
    
can it be a function where you get "X" and "X_list" ? or do you always have a,b,a_list,b_list ? what exactly is match doing? what type of object is a and b? –  Inbar Rose Nov 28 '12 at 14:23
    
“without extracting parts of it to separate functions” – why? –  poke Nov 28 '12 at 14:35
1  
"extracting parts of it to separate functions" == DRY –  hexparrot Nov 28 '12 at 14:36
1  
@InbarRose Thank you for your question, I've edited the text to reflect that the method and type is of no concern. –  user583619 Nov 28 '12 at 14:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a simple answer:

for i, i_list  in [(a, a_list), (b, b_list)]:
    if i == arg:
        if arg not in i_list:
            do_something(arg)
        break
else:
    do_something_else(arg)

Combining the a, and a_list and b, and b_list into tuples, we can easier iterate them. Then its a simple matter of the iteration itself, matching the conditions, and running the desired function..

Python supports for....else statements.

The else statement will run if there are no returns or breaks in the for loop.

Here, if we get our desired match, the loop will break, and we are done. if we never break, then we get to our else loop. In my opinion this is the most Pythonic way to do this.

Edit

To make this any better, you should have a, b, a_list, b_list inside some kind of dictionary, where d[a] = a_list

Then you could just iterate over the dict like this:

for k, v  in d.items():
    if k == arg:
        if arg not in v:
            do_something(arg)
        break
else:
    do_something_else(arg)

It's almost the same thing, but it looks nicer, and you can have all your a's and b's and lists all sorted out before hand.

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1  
Thank you, this is exactly the type of answer I was looking for! Appreciate your time InbarRose –  user583619 Nov 28 '12 at 15:14
    
I think there is some difference. If b == arg but b in b_list then your code will call do_something_else but original code will not do anything. –  Igor Nov 28 '12 at 15:16
    
@Igor you are right. i will fix this in a moment. - it is fixed. –  Inbar Rose Nov 28 '12 at 15:20
def run_for_match(candidate, patterns, search_lists, handlers, default_handler):
    for pattern, search_list, handler in zip(patterns, search_lists, handlers):
        if match(pattern, candidate):
            if candidate not in search_list:
                handler(candidate)
            break
    else:
        default_handler(candidate)

run_for_match(string, [a, b], [a_list, b_list], [do_something, do_something], do_something_else)

Though putting this in to an object that encapsulates the patterns, search_lists, handlers, and default_handler makes an awful lot of sense. Something like:

class StringHandlerManager(object):

    def __init__(self, default_handler):
        self.handler_registry = []
        self.default_handler = default_handler

    def add_handler(self, pattern, search_list, handler):
        self.handler_registry.append((pattern, search_list, handler))

    def __call__(self, candidate):
        for pattern, search_list, handler in self.handler_registry:
            if match(pattern, candidate):
                if candidate not in search_list:
                    handler(candidate)
                break
        else:
            default_handler(candidate)

handle_string = StringHandlerManager(do_something_else)
handle_string.add_handler(a, a_list, do_something)
handle_string.add_handler(b, b_list, do_something)
handle_string(string)
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