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Is it possible to initialize in a class a global const in a class method? I would like to use a method in my class to set the const.

My idea was:

/* a.h */
class A {
private:
    const string cs;

public:
    A();
    ~A();

    bool cs(const string &host, ...)
};

/* a.cpp */
A::A(){
}

A::~A(){
}

bool cs(const string &host, ...) {
    /* check some values */
    cs = "Set Vaule";   //Doesnt work, get an compiler error
}

Is It possible to set a global const in a method?

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1  
If you could change it after it was initialized it wouldn't be const. –  Pete Becker Nov 28 '12 at 14:29
1  
What's the bigger picture of what you're trying to accomplish? Why not just use an accessor method to restrict access? –  RonaldBarzell Nov 28 '12 at 14:30
1  
In what sense is cs a global ? –  Robᵩ Nov 28 '12 at 14:39
    
Your use of the world "global" seems to betray some confusion on your part. You do know that each instance of your class A has a different copy of cs right? Second, you should avoid naming functions the same thing as variables. –  Yakk Nov 28 '12 at 15:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. You could initialize it in a constructor initializer, but once initialized a const member cannot be changed. Otherwise, it wouldn't be a constant, now, would it?

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Ok, I thought as much! I wasn’t sure. Thanks everyone! –  hofmeister Nov 28 '12 at 14:32

This is only possible in the constructor of your class, and there only in the initializer-list:

A() : cs("Set Value") {
}
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No, you can only set it in a constructor. After construction, it's set in stone.

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As mentioned, you need to initialize the const members of an object using its initializer list:

/* a.h */
class A {
private:
    const string cs;

public:
    A(const string &value) :
        cs(value) // <---- initialize here!.
    {};
};

It is the same for every const member of the class:

class A {
private:
    const string cs;
    const float numberofthebeast;
    const char z;

public:
    A(const string &value, const float number, const char character) :
        cs(value),
        numberofthebeast(number),
        z(character)
        {};
};

If you don't want to provide a constructor to initialize each value, you can provide a default value in the default constructor, but remember that you cannot change the value after the construction:

class A {
private:
    const string cs;
    const float numberofthebeast;
    const char z;

public:
    A(const string &value, const float number, const char character) :
        cs(value),
        numberofthebeast(number),
        z(character)
        {};

    // Default values!!!
    A() :
        cs("default ctor"),
        numberofthebeast(666.666f),
        z('Z')
        {};
};

The constructor initializer list is also useful to initialize other members, like references o complex data that doesn't provide default constructor:

const unsigned float PI = 3.14f;

class Weird
{
    Weird (int w);
    // no default ctor!
    int W;
};

class Foo
{
    // Error: weird doesn't provide default ctor, 
    Weird w;
    // Error: reference uninitialized.
    float &pi;
};

class Bar
{
    Bar() :
        // Ok, Weird is constructed correctly.
        w(1),
        // Ok, pi is initialized.
        pi(PI)
    {};
    Weird w;
    float &pi;
};
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As all the other answers have asserted, you cannot change the value of a const class member after initialization. However, some people think they are very clever and use the const_cast<>

class A {
  const int x;
public:
  A(int _x) : x(_x) {}
  void change_x(int _x)        // change x ?!
  { const_cast<int&>(x) = _x; }
};

With the gnu and intel compilers, this actually compiles without warning AFAIK and may even work. But this violates the language rules and constitutes the dreaded UB (undefined behaviour). In other words, it may not always work as intended, since the compiler is allowed to assume that x is unchanged since initialization.

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