Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a log file that looks like this:

www.domainone.com FIX 3.3 12.12.123.1
www.domainone.com FIX 3.4 12.12.123.1
www.domainone.com FIX 2.4 12.12.123.1
www.domaintwo.com MAX 1.4 44.15.153.5
www.domaintwo.com MAX 3.2 44.15.153.5
www.domaintwo.com MAX 3.9 44.15.153.5
www.domaintwo.com MAX 12.4 44.15.153.5
www.domainthree.com NAN 3.4 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 2.4 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 3.2 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 3.3 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 1.4 34.45.144.7

And I want to run a grep, awk, sed or other bash command/script that will split that log file by the last column, so the result is 3 log files that are named using the IP without the dot. So, one of them would be 34.45.144.7.log and have

www.domainthree.com NAN 3.4 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 2.4 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 3.2 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 3.3 34.45.144.7
www.domainthree.com NAN 1.4 34.45.144.7

I was able to sort them and remove some columns from original log with with awk but no idea how to split into files using one column.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If the IP is always the fourth column, you can just use

awk '{ filename=$4".log"; if (prev && (filename != prev)) close(prev); print >>filename; prev=filename }' ips.log

or according to @Ed Morton, even better yet

awk '{ print >>($4".log"); close($4".log") }' ips.log

This prints the whole line into a file composed of the fourth column (IP) + ".log"

This is with Ubuntu 12.04 and GNU awk 3.1.8.

share|improve this answer
    
got awk: syntax error at source line 1, context is {print >>> >$4".log" <<< –  iwek Nov 28 '12 at 14:58
    
I don't get an error when I remove ">" but then it does not get printed to other file. Also, as explained, I need 3 files, with all the lines, based on IP. –  iwek Nov 28 '12 at 15:06
    
@iwek What OS and awk do you use? –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 28 '12 at 15:10
    
I have a MAC OSX 10.6.8, but I can run Ubuntu if necessary. More importantly, I need 3 files since there are 3 different IP addresses and each of the files needs to have all the lines, not just IP addresses. –  iwek Nov 28 '12 at 15:13
1  
I see you edited it and it's close but I meant awk '{filename=$4".log"; if (filename != prev) close(prev); print >filename; prev=filename }' ips.log. As-is it'd fail since it's testing filename against just $4 instead of $4".log". –  Ed Morton Nov 29 '12 at 21:51
show 11 more comments

so the result is 3 log files that are named using the IP without the dot.

awk '{f=$4; gsub(/\./,"",f);print > f".log"}' ips.log
share|improve this answer
    
got awk: syntax error at source line 1, context is {f=$4; gsub(/\./,"",f);print > >>> f".log" <<< –  iwek Nov 28 '12 at 14:59
    
the problem is the ">" inside the awk script. –  iwek Nov 28 '12 at 15:08
    
thanks for this. it was an OSX bug. But you did forget the global. In OSX, this worked: awk '{filename = gsub(/\./g,"",$4)".log"; print > filename}' test.log –  iwek Nov 28 '12 at 15:18
    
It's not necessarily a bug. When you do print > $4 ".log" does that mean (print > $4) ".log" or print > ($4 ".log")? The answer is it's ambiguous so you should parenthesize as you want it. In this case you should write print > ($4 ".log"). –  Ed Morton Nov 28 '12 at 22:25
add comment

At @OlafDietsche's request:

awk '{ filename=$4".log"; if (filename != prev) close(prev); print >filename; prev=filename }' ips.log

Didn't expect the comments to drag out that long or I'd have done that off the bat!

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for all the help. Thanks again. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 30 '12 at 14:56
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.