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Is it possible to print HTML pages with custom headers and footers on each printed page?

I'd like to add the word "UNCLASSIFIED" in red, Arial, size 16pt to the top and bottom of every printed page, regardless of the content.

To clarify, if the document was printed onto 5 pages, each page should have the custom header and footer.

Does anybody know if this is possible using HTML/CSS?

share|improve this question
2  
See Why use XSL-FO instead of CSS2, for transform HTML into good PDF? question and answers. – Peter Krauss Jul 26 '12 at 18:36
3  
This is a question that I try to answer for a long time. Looks like the key to the problem would be css elements like page, top-center, content, position: running(..). How it could look if browsers would fully support @page: techrepublic.com/blog/webmaster/… alistapart.com/articles/boom alistapart.com/articles/building-books-with-css3 Some open issues: code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=47277 bugs.webkit.org/show_bug.cgi?id=15548 – Daniel Nov 29 '12 at 1:54
    
I have posted a Chrome-compatible solution here that will add a running header to documents that don't contain overly-large expanses of text. Still no solution for footers, though. – DoctorDestructo Sep 17 '14 at 0:35

11 Answers 11

If you take the element that you want to be the footer and set it to be position:fixed and bottom:0, when the page prints it will repeat that element at the bottom of each printed page. The same would work for a header element, just set top:0 instead.

For example:

<div class="divFooter">UNCLASSIFIED</div>

CSS:

<style type="text/css">
    @media screen {
        div.divFooter {
            display: none;
        }
    }
    @media print {
        div.divFooter {
            position: fixed;
            bottom: 0;
        }
    }
</style>
share|improve this answer
22  
+1 This is the only guy who actually read the question! – Marcus Downing Dec 17 '10 at 16:48
17  
Doesn't seem to work if you have an element which spans two pages (pre in my case) - the footer will be overwritten on it. – Benjol Apr 13 '11 at 11:20
61  
It seems like webkit browsers don't support this properly. Correct me if I am wrong though! – Gregg Lind Aug 10 '11 at 0:49
45  
This doesn't seem to repeat on every page. – Tyson of the Northwest Aug 18 '11 at 22:05
14  
This did not work for me, I'm using Chrome 15.0. All it does is print the element where it would be on the screen, e.g. in the middle of the page, if that's where I scrolled to. It certainly doesn't print on every page. – chharvey Dec 6 '11 at 10:11

i believe the correct answer is that HTML 5 and CSS3 have no support for printing page header and footers in print media.

And while you might be able to simulate it with:

  • tables
  • fixed position blocks

they each have bugs that prevent them from being the ideal general solution.

share|improve this answer
9  
Don't trust the other answers. They might work for special cases but will just horribly break in general. There is no reliable solution until @page margin boxes are implemented in major browsers. See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… – user2847643 Dec 5 '14 at 19:50

Use page breaks to define the styles in CSS:

@media all
  {
  #page-one, .footer, .page-break { display:none; }
  }

@media print
  {
  #page-one, .footer, .page-break   
    { 
    display: block;
    color:red; 
    font-family:Arial; 
    font-size: 16px; 
    text-transform: uppercase; 
    }
  .page-break
    {
    page-break-before:always;
    } 
}

Then add the markup in the document at the appropriate places:

<h2 id="page-one">unclassified</h2>
<!-- content block -->
<h2 class="footer">unclassified</h2>
<h2 class="page-break">unclassified</h2>
<!-- content block -->
<h2 class="footer">unclassified</h2>
<h2 class="page-break">unclassified</h2>
<!-- content block -->
<h2 class="footer">unclassified</h2>
<h2 class="page-break">unclassified</h2>
<!-- content block -->
<h2 class="footer">unclassified</h2>
<h2 class="page-break">unclassified</h2>

References

share|improve this answer
11  
This does not print a header and footer on each page. It specifies many "pages" with best guess. If you don't know your document height (number of pages), it's useless. – rainabba Jan 18 '14 at 0:52
    
@rainabba if the document was printed onto 5 pages – Paul Sweatte Jan 21 '14 at 18:18

From this question -- add the following styles to a print-only stylesheet. This solution will work in IE and Firefox, but not in Chrome (as of version 21):

#header {
  display: table-header-group;
}

#main {
  display: table-row-group;
}

#footer {
  display: table-footer-group;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I have found this solution only working one. Haven't tested all browsers but it works in Firefox! – Primoz Rome Feb 14 '13 at 13:41

If you can use javascipt, have the client handle laying out the content using javascript to place elements based on available space.

You could use the jquery columnizer plugin to dynamically lay out your content in fixed size blocks and position your headers and footers as part of the rendering routine. http://welcome.totheinter.net/columnizer-jquery-plugin/

See example 10 http://welcome.totheinter.net/autocolumn/sample10.html

The browser will still add its own headers or footers if enabled in the os. Consistent layout across platforms and browsers will likely require conditional css.

share|improve this answer
    
The provided demo doesn't even work (pages don't break, bleed on to each other, etc.), let alone with more universal content. – rainabba Jan 18 '14 at 1:13
    
I should have clarified. The provided links are examples of a javascript library for laying out content across containers and is not setup for printing. This link was meant to be an example of using js to layout content within specified boundaries. I have used js as a rendering engine with wkhtmltopdf to create cookbooks from database content. – sparkalow Mar 13 '14 at 15:43

I have been searching for years for a solution and found this post on how to print a footer that works on multiple pages without overlapping page content.

My requirement was IE8, so far I have found that this does not work in Chrome.

This example uses tables and the tfoot element by setting the css style:

tfoot {display: table-footer-group;}
share|improve this answer
1  
this works in all browsers and in asp (which has some crazy issue with page footers) Use this i say. – DWolf Jul 24 '13 at 15:34
4  
Correction:Doesnt work in chrome. – DWolf Jul 24 '13 at 15:41
3  
@DWolf First comment give me a huge hope. And you destroy me in one sentence just after that. – C0ZEN Feb 24 at 14:19

I tried to fight this futile battle combining tfoot & css rules but it only worked on Firefox :(. When using plain css, the content flows over the footer. When using tfoot, the footer on the last page does not stay nicely on the bottom. This is because table footers are meant for tables, not physical pages. Tested on Chrome 16, Opera 11, Firefox 3 & 6 and IE6.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<title>Header & Footer test</title>

<style>

  @media screen {
    div#footer_wrapper {
      display: none;
    }
  }

  @media print {
    tfoot { visibility: hidden; }

    div#footer_wrapper {
      margin: 0px 2px 0px 7px;
      position: fixed;
      bottom: 0;
    }

    div#footer_content {
      font-weight: bold;
    }
  }

</style>
</head>

<body>

<div id="footer_wrapper">
  <div id="footer_content">
    Total 4923
  </div>
</div>


<TABLE CELLPADDING=6>

<THEAD>
<TR> <TH>Weekday</TH> <TH>Date</TH> <TH>Manager</TH> <TH>Qty</TH> </TR>
</THEAD>

<TBODY>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Mon</TD> <TD>09/11</TD> <TD>Kelsey</TD>  <TD>639</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Tue</TD> <TD>09/12</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>596</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Wed</TD> <TD>09/13</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>1135</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Thu</TD> <TD>09/14</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>1002</TD> </TR>
<TR> <TD>Fri</TD> <TD>09/15</TD> <TD>Randy</TD>   <TD>908</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sat</TD> <TD>09/16</TD> <TD>Lindsey</TD> <TD>371</TD>  </TR>
<TR> <TD>Sun</TD> <TD>09/17</TD> <TD>Susan</TD>   <TD>272</TD>  </TR>
</TBODY>

<TFOOT id="table_footer">
<TR> <TH ALIGN=LEFT COLSPAN=3>Total</TH> <TH>4923</TH> </TR>
</TFOOT>

</TABLE>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

Is this something you want to print-only? You could add it to every page on your site and use CSS to define the tag as a print-only media.

As an example, this could be an example header:

<span class="printspan">UNCLASSIFIED</span>

And in your CSS, do something like this:

<style type="text/css" media="screen">
    .printspan
    {
        display: none;
    }
</style>
<style type="text/css" media="print">
    .printspan
    {
        display: inline;
        font-family: Arial, sans-serif;
        font-size: 16 pt;
        color: red;
    }
</style>

Finally, to include the header/footer on every page you might use server-side includes or if you have any pages being generated with PHP or ASP you could simply code it in to a common file.

Edit:

This answer is intended to provide a way to show something on the physical printed version of a document while not showing it otherwise. However just as comments suggest, it doesn't solve the issue of having a footer on multiple printed pages when content overflows.

I'm leaving it here in case it's helpful nevertheless.

share|improve this answer
4  
+1 for using display rather than visibility - visibility : hidden leaves reserved space, whereas display : none collapses the whitespace, saves paper and makes planet Earth survive longer. – Sohnee Sep 1 '09 at 7:29
3  
-1: although a good example of a print style sheet, it doesn't deal with the issue of when content overflows a page.. As is, this would only show the footer on the last page. – NotMe Sep 24 '10 at 19:13

I just spent the better half of my day coming up with a solution that actually worked for me and thought I would share what I did. The problem with the solutions above that I was having was that all of my paragraph elements would overlap with the footer I wanted at the bottom of the page. In order to get around this, I used the following CSS:

footer {
  font-size: 9px;
  color: #f00;
  text-align: center;
}

@page {
  size: A4;
  margin: 11mm 17mm 17mm 17mm;
}

@media print {
  footer {
    position: fixed;
    bottom: 0;
  }

  .content-block, p {
    page-break-inside: avoid;
  }

  html, body {
    width: 210mm;
    height: 297mm;
  }
}

The page-break-inside for p and content-block was crucial for me. Any time I have a p following an h*, I wrap them both in a div class = "content-block"> to ensure they stay together and don't break.

I'm hoping that someone finds this useful because it took me about 3 hours to figure out (I'm also new to CSS/HTML, so there's that...)

share|improve this answer

If you are using a template engine like Asp.net Razor Engine or Angular, I think you must re-generate your page and split the page in several pages and then you can freely markup each page and put header and footer on theme. one example could be as bellow:

@page {
  size: A4;  
   margin: .9cm;
}


@media print {

   body.print-paper-a4 {
    width: 210mm;
    height: 297mm;
  }

   body {
       background: white;
       margin: 0;
       padding: 0;
   }

   .print-stage,
   .no-print {
       display: none;
   }


   body.print-paper.a4 .print-paper {
      width: 210mm;
        height: 297mm;
    }

   .print-paper {
       page-break-after: always;
       margin: 0;
       padding: .8cm;
       border:none;
       overflow: hidden;
   }

}





.print-papers {
    display: block;
    z-index: 2000;
    margin: auto;

}


body.print-paper-a4 .print-paper {
    width: 21cm;
    height:27cm;
}


.print-paper {
    margin: auto;
    background: white;
    border: 1px dotted black;
    box-sizing: border-box;
    margin: 1cm auto;
    padding: .8cm;
       overflow: hidden;   
}


body.print-mode .no-print-preview {
    display: none;
}

body.print-mode .print-preview {
    display: block;
}
<body class="print-mode print-paper-a4">
        
        <div class="print-papers print-preview">
            <div class="print-paper">
                <div style="font-size: 5cm">
                    HELLO
                </div>

            </div>
            <div class="print-paper">
              <div class="page-header">
                </div>
              
              
            </div>
            <div class="print-paper">
                
                

            </div>            
        </div>
  </body>

share|improve this answer

Loop through pages

HTML:

<div class="footer">
  Your footer here
</div>
<div class="header">
  Header here
</div>
<div class="content">
  Page content here
</div>
<!-- if this is not the last page, add this: -->
<div class="page-break"></div>

CSS:

@media print {
  .footer{ position:absolute; margin-top:850px; }
  .page-break{ page-break-after:always; }
}

Adjust margin-top:850px based on your footer's height.

"But I can't loop through pages!"

Consider segmenting your content, such as based on character count, line count, and/or object sizes.

The alternative is to use PDF (good luck with that!).

share|improve this answer

protected by Community May 23 '14 at 17:36

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