Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Trying with sed (in bash script) to do some substring editing

string1=randomthing0]
string2=otherthing[15]}]
string3=reallyotherthing[5]]

The aim is to remove the ]s when it is not used as an index-type as in the second one. The output should be

string1=randomthing0
string2=otherthing[15]}
string3=reallyotherthing[5]
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

This works for me:

s/\[\([^]]\+\)\]/@B@\1@E@/g
s/\]//g
s/@B@/[/g
s/@E@/]/g

It first replaces all [...] with @B@...@E@, i.t. the only remaining ]'s are the non-balanced ones. Then, it just removes them and replaces the @-strings back.

Be careful: your input should never contain the @-strings.

share|improve this answer
1  
The way you can deal with that is to wrap the command in sed 's/@/@A/g' | ... script ... | sed 's/@A/@/g' so within the script you can use @B, @C, etc. to represent whatever you like and you KNOW those could not be present in the input your script gets because every @ in your original input is succeeded by an A thanks to the first sed. –  Ed Morton Nov 28 '12 at 23:06
    
Thanks a lot :) –  newbee Nov 29 '12 at 3:10
    
Just be aware the above script MIGHT not behave as you want for text like the [ array[7] since the first sed command would match [ array[7] rather than [7]. If that's a problem, change [^]] to [^][]. –  Ed Morton Nov 29 '12 at 4:15

if awk is accepted as well, check the awk solution below:

awk  'BEGIN{OFS=FS=""}{ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){
        s+=$i=="["?1:0; 
        e+=$i=="]"?1:0;            
        if(e>s){$i="";e--} } 
        s=e=0; print $0; }' file

Note

  • the script above is NOT generic enough. it only remove unbalanced "]", which means foo[a[b[c] won't be modified
  • if there is unbalanced ], they would be deleted, no matter they are at the end of the line or not. so foo[x]bar]blah will be changed into foo[x]barblah

an example explains it better: (I added two more lines in your input)

#in my new lines(1,2) all "]"s surrounded with * should be removed
kent$  cat a.txt  
stringx=randomthi[foo]bar*]*xx*]*
stringy=random[f]x*]*bar[b]*]*blah
string1=randomthing0]
string2=otherthing[15]}]
string3=reallyotherthing[5]]

kent$  awk  'BEGIN{OFS=FS=""}{ for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){
        s+=$i=="["?1:0;
        e+=$i=="]"?1:0;
        if(e>s){$i="";e--} } 
        s=e=0; print $0; }' a.txt
stringx=randomthi[foo]bar**xx**
stringy=random[f]x**bar[b]**blah
string1=randomthing0
string2=otherthing[15]}
string3=reallyotherthing[5]

hope it helps

share|improve this answer
sed 's/\([^\[0-9]\)\([0-9\]*\)\]/\1\2/'

This removes any ] which is preceded by something not in [ or 0-9 followed by zero or more 0-9 characters.

share|improve this answer

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/([^][]*(\[[^]]*\][^][]*)*)\]/\1/g' file
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.