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How could I call the onCompleteCallBack method on the same thread the SomeAsyncMethod was called ?

public void SomeAsycMethod ( Action<object> onCompleteCallBack )
{
    // get the current thread 
    /* var ThisThread = Thread.CurrentThread. */

    Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep( 1000 );// do some work;

        // lastly call the onCompleteCallBack on 'ThisThread'
        onCompleteCallBack( "some result" );

        // I am looking for something like:
        /* ThisThread.Invoke("some result"); */
    });
}
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3  
Its not really designed to work like this. Better you should pass the task back as a return value. The caller then waits on the task completion and checks the result. –  Justin Harvey Nov 28 '12 at 16:22
    
Why exactly do you need this? Is the thread in question a UI thread? Also, can you use C# 5.0? –  svick Nov 28 '12 at 17:15
    
I am just creating a lot of helper methos from a class and some of them I will like to create an async version. I can return a task and that will be ok. I just want to follow the same pattern on all of them. I might be calling some of those methods using UI stuff. –  Tono Nam Nov 28 '12 at 22:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

While you can't guarantee you callback will be called on the same thread, you can guarantee it will be called in the same Synchronization Context (assuming one exists in the original call).

public void SomeAsycMethod ( Action<object> onCompleteCallBack )
{
    // get the current context
    var context = SynchronizationContext.Current;

    Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep( 1000 );// do some work;

        // lastly call the onCompleteCallBack on 'ThisThread'
        onCompleteCallBack( "some result" );

        // I am looking for something like:
        context.Post(s => onCompleteCallBack ("some result"), null); 
    });
}

For example, in a Windows Forms or WPF program, the above will make sure that the callback is called on the GUI thread (via the message loop or dispatcher, accordingly). Similarly for ASP.NET context.

Having said that, I agree with Justin Harvey in that returning a Task<T> will probably be a better design.

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context.Post is calling the onCompleteCallBack? I guess I will have to take Justin Harvey approach... +1 for the help –  Tono Nam Nov 28 '12 at 16:38
    
I fixed the syntax –  Ohad Schneider Nov 28 '12 at 16:43
    
Perhaps if you clarified why you need this behavior we could help further. Also, you're welcome :) –  Ohad Schneider Nov 28 '12 at 18:01

Actually if you're using Task-based asynchronous programming I suggested you refactor your code to return Task<T> and give an ability to your client itself to decide in what context to call callback method (and facilitate future migration to C# 5.0 ;):

public Task<string> SomeMethodAsync()
{
   return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => "some result");
}

If you definitely know that you're going to call this method from UI thread you can use following:

var task = SomeMethodAsync();
task.ContinueWith(t => textBox.Text = t.Result, TaskScheduler.FromSynchronizationContext);

This approach is better because it provide more clear separation of concern and give an ability to use your asynchronous method in any context without any dependencies to synchronization context. Some client can call this method from UI thread (and in this case TaskScheduler.FromSynchronizationContext would behave as expected - your "continuation" would be called in UI thread), some of them could use your method from non-UI thread as well without such requirements like processing results in the same thread that initiate asynchronous operation.

Task<T> is a perfect class that represents asynchronous operation as a first class object that helps not only obtain only more declarative code but more clear, easy to read and easy to test (you can easily mock this method and return "fake" task object).

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