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How to work with complex numbers in C?

So I have this piece of C code that compiles with errors saying that 'complex' does not name a type:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <complex.h>
#include <math.h>

int main ()
{
    int B=9;
    double theta;

    double complex w;
    float x,y;

    x= 5*cos (theta) - 2;
    y= 5*sin (theta);


    double complex z=x+y*I;
    w=z+(B/z);

    for(theta=0;theta<=360;theta=+30)
    { printf ("%.2f  %.2f  %.2f  %.2f",creal(z), cimag(z),y,creal(w), cimag(w));
        printf ("/n");
    } 

    return 0;

    system ("pause");
}

I already include the <complex.h> so why is there still an error for the 'complex'. There are also other errors, but let just focus on this one first.

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marked as duplicate by n.m., Kevin Peno, Daniel Mann, Mario, Vulcan Nov 28 '12 at 22:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
On my box, the error goes away when I move the declaration of z to after the point where x and y get their values. –  larsmans Nov 28 '12 at 16:29
    
You are not using the header file correctly stackoverflow.com/questions/6418807/… –  AsheeshR Nov 28 '12 at 16:30
    
it isn't about the values actually, it is about the 'complex' syntax. It didn't detect the 'complex' eventhough I already #include <complex.h>. –  Shahrul Nizam Nov 28 '12 at 16:32
    
@AshRj I did find this answer but sorry to say that I didn't quite understand it. so I need to enable C99 support?? –  Shahrul Nizam Nov 28 '12 at 16:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Are you using GCC as your compiler? If yes, you need to enable C99 support by using the -std=c99 or -std=gnu99 compiler flag.

Also, declare variables before you use them. Here:

double complex z=x+y*I;

neither x nor y have been declared yet. Of course you also need to initialize them. For example:

float x = 5 * cos(theta) - 2;
float y = 5 * sin(theta);
double complex z = x + y * I;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing that out. I already declare x and y as float actually. I did find that information, but I didn't actually know how to implement it. Can you guide me or give me any link? :) –  Shahrul Nizam Nov 28 '12 at 16:36
    
@ShahrulNizam How do you run your code ? –  AsheeshR Nov 28 '12 at 16:37
1  
@ShahrulNizam The point is that you're using x and y before you actually declare them. Read my answer again. –  Nikos C. Nov 28 '12 at 16:38
    
@NikosC. he is asking how to use the compiler flag –  AsheeshR Nov 28 '12 at 16:39
    
@ShahrulNizam We need to know your development environment. Are you using Dev-C++? Or aren't you using GCC at all? (For example Visual Studio?) –  Nikos C. Nov 28 '12 at 16:40

This should work :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <complex.h>
#include <math.h>
int main ()

{
 int B=9;
 double theta;
 double complex w;
 float x = 5*cos (theta) - 2;
 float y = 5*sin (theta);
 double complex z=x+y*I;

 w=z+(B/z);

 for(theta=0;theta<=360;theta=+30)
  { printf ("%.2f  %.2f  %.2f  %.2f",creal(z), cimag(z),y,creal(w), cimag(w));
   printf ("/n");
  } 

  return 0;
 }
share|improve this answer
    
thanks man. But I still have problems with the 'complex'. I think its the compiler flag problem. How to enable C99 support?? –  Shahrul Nizam Nov 28 '12 at 16:46
    
Use the -std=c99 compiler flag –  Joze Nov 28 '12 at 16:51
    
Now it came up with "expected initializer before 'w'" and "'w' is not declared in this scope.". As far as i can see, w already been decalred. –  Shahrul Nizam Nov 28 '12 at 17:01

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