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I have an algorithm for reducing a font size in a given text box if the text is too big for the box (fit to box)

and it works just fine, but it's really inefficient as it's literally just reducing the font size by 1 till it fits.

Can anyone help me make it more efficient, such as binary chopping or something?

the code is:

function fitToBox(object, maxFontSize, minFontSize, maxHeight) {
    var box = document.getElementById(object);
    var currentHeight = box.offsetHeight;                       
    var currentFontSize = maxFontSize;                  
    do {
        box.style.fontSize = currentFontSize+"pt";
        currentFontSize = box.style.fontSize.replace("pt", "");
        currentHeight = box.offsetHeight;                                                       
        if(currentHeight >= maxHeight) {
            currentFontSize -= 1;
        }
    } while (currentHeight > maxHeight && currentFontSize > minFontSize);
    box.style.lineHeight = currentFontSize+"pt";
}

Complete example in HTML (just add more text to the div to see the fitting in progress)

<html>
<head>
<script type="text/javascript">
function fitToBox(object, maxFontSize, minFontSize, maxHeight) {
    var box = document.getElementById(object);
    var currentHeight = box.offsetHeight;                       
    var currentFontSize = maxFontSize;                  
    do {
        box.style.fontSize = currentFontSize+"pt";
        currentFontSize = box.style.fontSize.replace("pt", "");
        currentHeight = box.offsetHeight;                                                       
        if(currentHeight >= maxHeight) {
            currentFontSize -= 1;
        }
    } while (currentHeight > maxHeight && currentFontSize > minFontSize);
    box.style.lineHeight = currentFontSize+"pt";
}
</script>
</head>
<body>

<div id="fitme" style="background-color: yellow; font-size: 24pt; width: 400px;">
    This is some text that is fit into the box This is some text that is fit into the box This is some text that is fit into the box
</div>

<script type="text/javascript">
    fitToBox("fitme", 24, 4, 80);
</script>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this question
    
It might help to see some of the other javascript and html being used. More specifically what is calling this function. When I try it in my browser the above function is really buggy so maybe I'm not calling it as intended. –  robbieAreBest Nov 28 '12 at 17:27
    
I'll add a complete example to the original post –  Theston .E Fox Nov 29 '12 at 8:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's a version which reduces the loop count from 9 in your example to 4:

function fitToBox(box, maxFontSize, minFontSize, maxHeight) {
    inc = (maxFontSize - minFontSize) / 2;
    currentFontSize = minFontSize + inc;
    box.style.fontSize = currentFontSize+"pt";
    while(inc >= 1) {
        if(box.offsetHeight > maxHeight) {
            dir = -1;
        } else {
            dir = 1;
        }
        inc = Math.floor(inc/2);
        currentFontSize += (dir * inc);
        box.style.fontSize = currentFontSize+"pt";
    }
}

It starts by assuming the midway size is a good start and binary chops its way to the best fit below the maximum, changing direction as required.

I can't work out why you're changing the CSS line-height so I haven't done that.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm changing the line-height because it is initially set in the style of the div usually and therefore if you reduce the font size in javascript then the box height is affected by the larger originally set line height. –  Theston .E Fox Nov 30 '12 at 11:00

Could you do something like this where you measure the font height in px?

 function fitToBox(object, maxFontSize, minFontSize, maxHeight) {
     var box = document.getElementById(object);                       
     var currentFontSize = box.offsetHeight - 6; //however much space you want to leave                  
     if(currentFontSize > maxFontSize){
          currentFontSize = maxFontSize;
     }else if(currentFontSize < minFontSize){
          currentFontSize = minFontSize;
     }
     box.style.lineHeight = currentFontSize+"px";
  }
share|improve this answer
    
no, that won't give me the effect i'm after. Think of fit to content in something like powerpoint where the font gets gradually smaller to take up the most space available in a given box. The function I have works fine, it's just not very efficient. –  Theston .E Fox Nov 28 '12 at 16:50

Try counting the max allowed size based on the box styling.

Get the elements height - top padding - bottom padding and you'll get your max size.

var height = parseInt(box.clientHeight);
var pt = parseInt(box.style.paddingTop);
var pb = parseInt(box.style.paddingBottom);
var fontsize = (height - pt - pb) + "px";

As for the next part. Solution that comes to mind when it comes to detecting overflow is to do something like.

var boxClone = box.cloneNode(true)
boxClone.style.visibility = "hidden";
boxClone.id = "boxClone";
document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].appendChild(boxClone);

box.onkeydown = function(e) { 

}

In the keydown event, intercept the char thats about to get appended and append it into the boxclone - then measure its size and compare it to the original. Once you know the numbers you can adjust your text accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
ok so you're basically saying just set the font size in px rather than points and then just use the box height to do this? what I don't understand is how will this allow the font to be as big as possible and then reduce with the more text that is being entered? –  Theston .E Fox Nov 28 '12 at 16:49
    
sorry, initially i misunderstood what you needed. hopefully the edit will help you –  roacher Nov 28 '12 at 17:03
    
I still don't think it relates to my issue. I'm not talking about when you type into a box. The text is pre-created and it is put into a fix width/height div on the page. And i want the font size of that div to be dynamic so if there isn't a lot of text then the font size is big meaning the text takes up as much space as possible in the box. But if there is a lot of text then the font size must reduce to ensure it fits in the box. –  Theston .E Fox Nov 28 '12 at 17:08
    
My function works just fine, it's just the silly loop with the reducing the font size by 1 each time that's the problem as it's very inefficient. I want a better algorithm, something that is doing a binary chop or something. –  Theston .E Fox Nov 28 '12 at 17:09

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