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I have a text file that looks like this:

i 3755
i 3633
i 4435
i 1434

how would I go about reading this as an input, I've tried using fscanf, but it keeps on giving me a random character after the 'i'

for example output would look like

i% 3755

i5 3633

etc.

Here is what I've been trying:

    int data = 0; 
char command; 
if(fptr==NULL)
    printf("File Cannot Be Read"); 

fscanf(fptr,"%c %d\n", &command, &data); 
printf("%c " , command);
printf("%d\n" , data);

fscanf(fptr,"%s %d\n", &command, &data); 
printf("%c " , command);
printf("%d\n" , data); 

fscanf(fptr,"%s %d\n", &command, &data); 
printf("%s " , command);
printf("%d\n" , data);

none of them seem to work. Thanks for your help in advance!

edit: Heres the working code for anybody that was having the same problem:

int data = 0; 
char command; 
fptr = fopen(argv[1], "r"); 

if(fptr==NULL)
    printf("File Cannot Be Read"); 

while(fscanf(fptr,"%c %d \n", &command, &data) == 2)
{

        if(command == 'i')
        {
            printf("insert found\n");
        }
            if(command == 'd')
        {
            printf("delete found\n");
        }

} 

}

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
fscanf(fptr,"%c %d", command, &data); 

should be:

fscanf(fptr,"%c %d", &command, &data); 
getchar();  // consume the newline character that fscanf left.

Assuming you defined:

char command;
int data;
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it could be fscanf(fptr,"%c %d\n",&command, &data) –  Aniket Nov 28 '12 at 16:43
    
ah the getchar() command is what I was missing definitely, but how come I have to push enter for my program to get the next line?? –  Harrison Nov 28 '12 at 16:53
    
ohhhh i got it, to work without the getchar() by removing the \n from fscanf(fptr,"%s %d\n", &command, &data); will be putting it in a loop of course. Thanks a lot for your help everybody –  Harrison Nov 28 '12 at 17:00

For simplicity, I would recommend you to, in a loop, read a line using fgets() and then use strtok() to get different 'strings' and then cast according to your parsing methodology. But Mike is right as well, you can use fscanf(fptr, "%c %d\n", &command, &data) to read. When you're using a string, you can ignore the usage of "&" before the variable name. But when its a character or an integer or a float.. you will need to use the address of operator("&")

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at this line :

fscanf(fptr,"%c %d", command, &data); 

you should give it a pointer to command. like this :

fscanf(fptr,"%c %d", &command, &data); 

the next line can't work because the reading cursor is already at the end of the file.

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This is incorrect and will result in a buffer overrun:

fscanf(fptr,"%s %d", &command, &data);

as command has only enough space for a single char but fscanf() with format specifier "%s" will read until next whitespace and then write a terminating null character into command. Use a char[] to read and restrict the number of chars to be read.

Note that the NULL check just prints an error message, it does not actually prevent use of a NULL file pointer.


To ensure that each line is of the correct format use fgets() to read a line and then use sscanf() to read the fields. If fscanf() is used to read directly from the file then these two lines:

i
3755

are treated identically to the single line:

i 3755

as a new-line character is also whitespace. Example:

if (fptr)
{
    char line[1024];
    while (fgets(line, 1024, fptr))
    {
        char command;
        int data;
        if (2 == sscanf(line, "%c %d", &command, &data))
        {
            /* Use 'command' and 'data'. */
        }
    }
}
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in your fscanf function you have to expect the return to line by adding space at the end of format. Like this

fscanf(fptr,"%c %d ", &command, &data);

The space character replaces return to new line, tabulation and spaces

BTW I see that you use %s to read a char &command and this is incorrect

fscanf(fptr,"%s %d\n", &command, &data); 

you have to use this instead

fscanf(fptr,"%c %d ", &command, &data); 
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