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I understand how to generate AST from character streams using ANTLR.

I'd like to be able to create an AST programmatically and have ANTLR apply the rules in the grammar to produce valid output, for example adding in the syntactic stuff that isn't in the AST like say quotes and whitespace.

To use a tree walker you seem to need a TokenStream attached to the TreeNodeStream, but if the tree was created programmatically there is no TokenStream. Failing to call setTokenStream(...) on a CommonTreeNodeStream causes NullPointerExceptions at runtime.

example:

TokenStream tokens = new CommonTokenStream(new MyLexer(somestream));
// parse an AST 'ast' from this stream
CommonTreeNodeStream nodes = new CommonTreeNodeStream(ast);
// needs this or npe
nodes.setTokenStream(tokens);
new MyWalker(nodes).start();

so - can you create an AST on the fly without a character stream input and have some generated ANTLR class generate a character stream according to the rules defined in a grammar?

share|improve this question
    
I've never used setTokenStream(...). The times I needed a tree-walker, I did/do it like this. And I must confess that I lost you here: "can you create an AST on the fly without a character stream input and have some generated ANTLR class generate a character stream according to the rules defined in a grammar?"... You're talking about AST's and characters stream, what happened to the tokens? –  Bart Kiers Nov 28 '12 at 18:58
    
@Tshepang there are more questions tagged with ast than there are with abstract-syntax-tree: why change it? Badge hunting or something? –  Bart Kiers Feb 13 '14 at 20:13
    
That was automatic (it's a tag synonym). I only got rid of the useless generation. –  Tshepang Feb 13 '14 at 21:19

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