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Lets take a look at this code:

var mainFunction = function() {
  altFunction.apply(null, arguments);
}

The arguments that are passed to "mainFunction" are dynamic they can be 4 or 10 doesnt matter. However I have to pass them through to altFunction AND I have to add an EXTRA argument to the argument list.

I have tried this:

var mainFunction = function() {
  var mainArguments = arguments;
  mainArguments[mainArguments.length] = 'extra data'; // not +1 since length returns "human" count.

  altFunction.apply(null, mainArguments);
}

But that does not seem to work, how can I do this?

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by not +1 since length returns "human" count? – Ian Nov 28 '12 at 17:32
    
.length returns 4 if the array is 0, 1, 2, 3 it doesn't return 3, hope you understand it now. That is what I meant :P – onlineracoon Nov 28 '12 at 17:35
    
Well yeah, but that's the expected behavior of .length. When you use arr[arr.length] = "whatever", it's the same behavior as using .push(), and just adds the item to the end of the array. Your problem is that arguments is not an array, so that's why you need to use one of the many similar solutions that were provided. – Ian Nov 28 '12 at 17:37
    
Actually, you almost have it. Your code will work as is if you also do arguments.length++ before calling apply. – slebetman Nov 28 '12 at 17:53
up vote 15 down vote accepted

arguments is not a pure array. You need to make a normal array out of it:

var mainArguments = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
mainArguments.push("extra data");
share|improve this answer
4  
"You can't alter arguments array directly." Sure you can. – I Hate Lazy Nov 28 '12 at 17:37
3  
It should be noted that although you can modify the arguments like this, doing so prevents the js vm from being able to optimize the function call. So, if you're manipulating the arguments like this in a function that gets called a lot, there could be performance implications. – dbcb Jan 26 '15 at 22:17

Use Array.prototype.push

[].push.call(arguments, "new value");

There's no need to shallow clone the arguments object because it and its .length are mutable.

(function() {
    console.log(arguments[arguments.length - 1]); // foo

    [].push.call(arguments, "bar");

    console.log(arguments[arguments.length - 1]); // bar
})("foo");

From ECMAScript 5, 10.6 Arguments Object

  1. Call the [[DefineOwnProperty]] internal method on obj passing "length", the Property Descriptor {[[Value]]: len, [[Writable]]: true, [[Enumerable]]: false, [[Configurable]]: true}, and false as arguments.

So you can see that .length is writeable, so it will update with Array methods.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, I could've sworn arguments was read-only, but then I re-read the MDN spec and realized this – Ian Nov 28 '12 at 17:36
    
Brilliant answer! Exactly what I needed. Thanks. – Steve Danner Nov 21 '13 at 21:23
1  
Chapeau! Very nice – frequent Jul 5 '14 at 9:56
1  
[].splice.call(arguments,0,0,NEW_VAR) puts it at the first argument, very handy when you have a function that expects a certain value at first. – Riël Nov 25 '14 at 11:41
1  
I think this is throwing an error in 'strict mode'. Use Array.prototype.push.call(arguments, 'bar') instead if you have problems. – nfiniteloop Apr 9 '15 at 0:14

The arguments object isn't an array; it's like an array, but it's different. You can turn it into an array however:

var mainArguments = [].slice.call(arguments, 0);

Then you can push another value onto the end:

mainArguments.push("whatever");
share|improve this answer
var mainFunction = function() {
    var args = [].slice.call( arguments ); //Convert to array
    args.push( "extra data");
    return altFunction.apply( this, args );
}
share|improve this answer

The arguments "array" isn't an array (it's a design bug in JavaScript, according to Crockford), so you can't do that. You can turn it into an array, though:

var mainFunction = function() {
  var mainArguments = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
  mainArguments.push('extra data');

  altFunction.apply(null, mainArguments);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why is it a bug? Because you don't like it? – Ian Nov 28 '12 at 17:34
2  
Because Douglas Crockford said so – callumacrae Nov 28 '12 at 17:37
2  
@CallumMacrae: That's not much of a reason IMO. – I Hate Lazy Nov 28 '12 at 17:42
1  
Perhaps it's bad design, but that's not the same as a bug. IMO, a bug is when something does not work as intended. I assume arguments was made to be an Array-like object and not an Array on purpose, whether wisely or not. – Tim Goodman Nov 28 '12 at 18:09

One liner to add additional argument(s) and return the new array:

[].slice.call(arguments).concat(['new value']));
share|improve this answer
//
//    var
//        altFn  = function () {}, 
//        mainFn = prefilled( altFn  /* ...params */ );
//
//    mainFn(  /* ...params */  );
//  
//        
function prefilled ( fn /* ...params */ ) { 
     return ( function ( args1 ) { 

          var orfn = this;

          return function () { 

              return orfn.apply( this, args1.concat( cslc( arguments ) ) );

          };

     } ).call( fn, cslc( arguments, 1 ) );
}

// helper fn
function cslc( args, i, j ) { 
   return Array.prototype.slice.call( args, i, j );
}


// example

var
    f1 = function () { console.log( cslc( arguments ) ); }, 
    F1 = prefilled( f1, 98, 99, 100 );

F1( 'a', 'b', 'c' );

//
//   logs: [98, 99, 100, "a", "b", "c"]
//
//
share|improve this answer

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