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I have a problem with ruby, it won't load the file i have into the designated arrays.

class Dancer
  def Initialize (couplenumber, score1, score2, score3, score4, score5, score6, score7)
    @couplenumber = couplenumber
    @score1 = score1
    @score2 = score2
    @score3 = score3
    @score4 = score4
    @score5 = score5
    @score6 = score6
    @score7 = score7
  end

  def show()
    return "Couple Number: #{@couplenumber}. Scores: #{@score1}, #{@score2}, #{@score3}, #{@score4}, #{@score5}, #{@score6}, #{@score7}."
  end
end

results = File.open("danceresult.txt", "r+")
dancescores = []

# Splitting dance scores with "," and putting into arrays.
for dancers in results
  a = dancers.split(",")
  couplenumber = a[0]
  score1 = a[1]
  score2 = a[2]
  score3 = a[3]
  score4 = a[4]
  score5 = a[5]
  score6 = a[6]
  score7 = a[7]
  dancescores << Dancer.new
end

dancescores.each do |dance|
  puts dance.show
end

My problem is that Ruby only passes this:

Couple Number: . Scores: , , , , , , .
Couple Number: . Scores: , , , , , , .
Couple Number: . Scores: , , , , , , .
Couple Number: . Scores: , , , , , , .
Couple Number: . Scores: , , , , , , .
Couple Number: . Scores: , , , , , , .

I'm not very good at coding and still trying to learn :-) Thanks in advance.

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

A few problems here:

  1. The method is called initialize, not Initialize — capitalization is important.

  2. You have a bunch of variables with the same name in different places, you seem to think these will be the same variable, but they aren't. For example, the score1 in your initialize method is not the same as the one in the line score1 = a[1]. Likewise for couplenumber and so on.

  3. Because of the previous points, what you're inserting into the array is an empty Dancer object with none of its instance variables set to anything.

Here's a corrected version of the code:

class Dancer
  def initialize(couplenumber, score1, score2, score3, score4, score5, score6, score7)
    @couplenumber = couplenumber
    @score1 = score1
    @score2 = score2
    @score3 = score3
    @score4 = score4
    @score5 = score5
    @score6 = score6
    @score7 = score7
  end

  def show()
    return "Couple Number: #{@couplenumber}. Scores: #{@score1}, #{@score2}, #{@score3}, #{@score4}, #{@score5}, #{@score6}, #{@score7}."
  end
end

results = File.open("danceresult.txt", "r+")

# Splitting dance scores with "," and putting into arrays.
# Note that we're using map, which handles collecting the results into an array for us

dancescores = results.map |dancers|
  a = dancers.split(",")
  Dancer.new(a[0], a[1], a[2], a[3], a[4], a[5], a[6], a[7])

  # You could more simply write the previous line as
  # Dancer.new(*a[0..7]), but that's
  # essentially just syntactic sugar for the above
end
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you missed to pass arguments to Dancer

i would also suggest to refactor your code to something like this:

class Dancer
  def initialize( couplenumber, *scores )
    @couplenumber, @scores = couplenumber, scores
  end

  def show
    return "Couple Number: #{@couplenumber}. Scores: #{@scores.join(', ')}"
  end
end

file = "danceresult.txt"
dancescores = File.readlines(file).map do |line|
  Dancer.new *line.split(",")
end
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That def initialize couplenumber, *scores method definition is pretty weird and I think most people will find that style difficult to read. –  Chuck Nov 28 '12 at 17:58
    
@Chuck, splat-args is pretty ordinary Ruby. I've read it, and used it fairly often. It's also seen in the standard library, if I recall. –  Wayne Conrad Nov 28 '12 at 19:11
    
mm, "*scores is pretty weird", @Chuck, is this a kind of joke? –  alfred jon Nov 28 '12 at 19:17
1  
@WayneConrad: Well, yeah, the splat arg is fine and is how I'd write it. The "weird" thing is omitting parentheses in that method definition. It would normally be written as def initialize(couple_number, *scores). Omitting the parentheses forces the reader to have to look carefully at the line to determine that it is just an argument list and doesn't contain any code. I've seen obfuscated Ruby examples use this to great effect. –  Chuck Nov 28 '12 at 19:18
    
@Chuck, you right about parentheses. It will look awkward for people just starting with Ruby. Updated answer, thank you. –  user904990 Nov 28 '12 at 19:22
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Your first problem is a typo: the method should be named initialize, not Initialize.

I would also suggest that you look into Ruby's CSV library, which will do a much more reliable job parsing CSV data (and be more idiomatic).

My last suggestion is not to define show, but rather use to_s. Then you can simply puts dance and the object itself will know how to convert to a string.

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When you initialize your Dancer object, you are not passing in the couple number and scores.

The line

dancescores << Dancer.new

should be

dancescores << Dancer.new(couplenumber, score1, score2, score3, score4, score5, score6, score7)

Notice how the values you stored have to be passed to the initialization of Dancer.

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