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I can't seem to figure out the underlying factors that affect my kernels' performance. I implemented two simple kernels, one that loads two images and adds them, pixel by pixel, and one that loads two images and ANDS them, in the bitwise sense. Now, I've templatized them so that the kernels can take 8- and 32-bit images, as well as 1-, 3-, and 4-channel images.

So, initially I had both kernels loading the global memory as uchar3 and float3, along with uchar4 etc. I wasn't too sure about using the triples, however, because of coalescing, so I thought I'd give it a profiling run. I figured that since the operations were independent of channel number, I could just as well read the image as if it were a 1-channel uchar image of triple the width, rather than the uchar3 image that it really was.

In fact, the uchar3 global loads were much, much slower than the uchar loads. My efforts were vindicated. But, alas, this only happened with the arithmetic kernel. The bitwise AND operation showed the exact opposite result!

Now, I know I could just load the image data as uints rather than uchars, for the bitwise operation, which should take care of the coalescing perfectly. But let's assume I simply want to learn and understand what is going on.

And let's forget about float3s and float4s, etc. My problem is with the uchar versions of the kernels. So, in a nutshell, why is the uchar load sometimes faster than the uchar3 load, and sometimes not?

I'm using a GTX 470, compute capability 2.0.

PS. According to the CUDA programming guide, logical operations and add operations have the same throughput. (My kernel actually has to first convert the uchars to uints, but that should be happening in both kernels.) So the execution length should amount to much the same thing, from what I gather.

The arithmetic add kernel (uchar version):

__global__ void add_8uc1(uchar* inputOne, uchar* inputTwo, uchar* output, unsigned int width, unsigned int height, unsigned int widthStep)
{
    const int xCoordinateBase = blockIdx.x * IMAGE_X * IMAGE_MULTIPLIER + threadIdx.x;
    const int yCoordinate = blockIdx.y * IMAGE_Y + threadIdx.y;

    if (yCoordinate >= height)
        return;

#pragma unroll IMAGE_MULTIPLIER
    for (int i = 0; i < IMAGE_MULTIPLIER && xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X < width; ++i)
    {
        //  Load memory.
        uchar* inputElementOne = (inputOne + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x));
        uchar* inputElementTwo = (inputTwo + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x));

        //  Write output.
        *(output + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x)) = inputElementOne[0] + inputElementTwo[0];
    }
}

The bitwise AND kernel:

__global__ void and_8uc1(uchar* inputOne, uchar* inputTwo, uchar* output, unsigned int width, unsigned int height, unsigned int widthStep)
{
    const int xCoordinateBase = blockIdx.x * IMAGE_X * IMAGE_MULTIPLIER + threadIdx.x;
    const int yCoordinate = blockIdx.y * IMAGE_Y + threadIdx.y;

    if (yCoordinate >= height)
        return;

#pragma unroll IMAGE_MULTIPLIER
    for (int i = 0; i < IMAGE_MULTIPLIER && xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X < width; ++i)
    {
        //  Load memory.
        uchar* inputElementOne = (inputOne + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x));
        uchar* inputElementTwo = (inputTwo + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x));

        //  Write output.
        *(output + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x)) = inputElementOne[0] & inputElementTwo[0];
    }
}

The uchar3 versions are the same except that the load/store lines are now as follows:

        //  Load memory.
    uchar3 inputElementOne = *reinterpret_cast<uchar3*>(inputOne + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x) * 3);
    uchar3 inputElementTwo = *reinterpret_cast<uchar3*>(inputTwo + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x) * 3);

    //  Write output.
    *reinterpret_cast<uchar3*>(output + yCoordinate * widthStep + (xCoordinateBase + i * IMAGE_X + threadIdx.x) * 3) 
        = make_uchar3(inputElementOne.x + inputElementTwo.x, inputElementOne.y + inputElementTwo.y, inputElementOne.z + inputElementTwo.z);

Similarly for the AND kernel. (I'm not sure I remember the kernels exactly, to be honest... I'll confirm that tomorrow).

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1  
could you show us your kernels? It's kind of hard to reason about unknown code. And maybe tell us how the execution times compare (that is do the kernels take similar time for one version or the other, which is faster, ...). –  Grizzly Nov 28 '12 at 18:09
    
Can you give a succinct question? You want to know why loading a bunch of uchar could be quicker than loading a bunch of uchar3? The profiler in CUDA 5 will give a notice if uncoalesced loads/stores are an issue, even for the most basic types of profiling runs. What did it say percentage-wise about the 2 cases? –  Robert Crovella Nov 28 '12 at 18:20
    
The loads are linear and perfectly coalesced, at least in the uchar case. I can't paste the kernels because I'm not at work right now. I want to know why it is sometimes faster, and sometimes not. –  Kristian D'Amato Nov 28 '12 at 18:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

uchar3 loads are split by the compiler into separate loads as there are no 24-bit loads in the SM's instruction set. As such, they are never coalesced. To a certain degree, the cache is going to mitigate this.

However, depending on the exact execution configuration there might only be about 10.7 bytes of cache per thread (your example will probably come close to that value as the kernel is simple, so a lot of threads can run concurrently on one SM). As the cache is not fully associative, the number of usable bytes per thread might be a lot smaller before thrashing occurs. When exactly that happens depends on a lot of factors including the exact scheduling of instructions, which might be different even for instructions that have the same documented throughput.

You can compare the output of cuobjdump -sassexecutable for both versions to see whether the static scheduling by the compiler is the same. How the dynamic scheduling at runtime works out is basically unobservable however.

As you have noticed, all channels of the image are processed in the same way, so it doesn't matter how you distribute them between threads. The best option you have is to use uchar4 instead of uchar3 or uchar, which (assuming suitable alignment of the image) will give you coalesced accesses independent of the cache. This should result in both shorter and more consistent execution times.

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