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Like always, problems with pointers. This time I am trying to read a file (opened in binary mode) and store some portion of it in a std::string object. Let's see:

FILE* myfile = fopen("myfile.bin", "rb");
if (myfile != NULL) {
    short stringlength = 6;
    string mystring;
    fseek(myfile , 0, SEEK_SET);
    fread((char*)mystring.c_str(), sizeof(char), (size_t)stringlength, myfile);
    cout << mystring;
    fclose(myfile );
}

Is this possible? I don't get any message. I am sure the file is O.K. When I try with char* it does work but I want to store it directly into the string. Thanks for your help!

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2  
dude... what you get from c_str() is not mutable... –  BeyondSora Nov 28 '12 at 18:55
    
the comment above and answer below are both correct, but if you are using C++, why are you using C idioms for file I/O –  im so confused Nov 28 '12 at 19:00
1  
and to top it off, C++ streaming for output right after. –  im so confused Nov 28 '12 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Set the string to be large enough first to avoid buffer overrun, and access the byte array as &mystring[0] to satisfy const and other requirements of std::string.

FILE* myfile = fopen("myfile.bin", "rb");
if (myfile != NULL) {
    short stringlength = 6;
    string mystring( stringlength );
    fseek(myfile , 0, SEEK_SET);
    fread(&mystring[0], sizeof(char), (size_t)stringlength, myfile);
    cout << mystring;
    fclose(myfile );
}

There are many, many issues in this code but that is a minimal adjustment to properly use std::string.

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string::c_str() returns const char* which you can not modify.

One way to do this would be use a char* first and construct a string from it.

Example

char buffer = malloc(stringlength * sizeof(char));
fread(buffer, sizeof(char), (size_t)stringlength, myfile);
string mystring(buffer);
free(buffer);

But then again, if you want a string, you should perhaps ask yourself Why am I using fopen and fread in the first place??

fstream would be a much much better option. You can read more about it here

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The array length must be a constant. C++ does not have variable length arrays. –  Robᵩ Nov 28 '12 at 19:15
    
I see, thanks for pointing it out :) –  BeyondSora Nov 28 '12 at 19:39
    
fixed my answer.. –  BeyondSora Nov 28 '12 at 20:08

Please check out the following regarding c_str to see some things that are wrong with your program. A few issues include the c_str not being modifiable, but also that it returns a pointer to your string contents, but you never initialized the string.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/string/string/c_str/

As for resolving it... you could try reading into a char* and then initializing your string from that.

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No it is not. std::string::c_str() method does not return a modifiable character sequence as you can validate from here. A better solution would be using a buffer char array. Here is an example:

FILE* myfile = fopen("myfile.bin", "rb");
    if (myfile != NULL) {
        char buffer[7]; //Or you can use malloc() / new instead.  
        short stringlength = 6;
        fseek(myfile , 0, SEEK_SET);
        fread(buffer, sizeof(char), (size_t)stringlength, myfile);
        string mystring(buffer);
        cout << mystring;
        fclose(myfile );
        //use free() or delete if buffer is allocated dynamically
}
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