Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let´s say I have following object:

dict = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }

following works perfectly:

{a, b} = dict
// -> a = 1
// -> b = 2

Now I want to manipulate those numbers and write it back to the object and clearly following line does not work:

// some manipulations
dict = {a, b}

Obviously I have overwritten the dict object. What I essentially wanted to do is assign dict.a = a and dict.b = b with dict.c staying as it is.

Is it possible to achieve my goal with some sort of a short notation?

share|improve this question
    
Use an extend(...) style function, like this one: api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend –  asawyer Nov 28 '12 at 19:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can extract a slice of an object into separate local variables using:

{a, b} = dict

but there's no way to assign to a slice of an object, i.e. you can't do things like this:

dict{a, b} = [ x, y ]

as a shortcut for

dict.a = x
dict.b = y

You can't even extract an object slice into a new object with things like this:

obj = dict{a, b}

you have to do it in two steps:

{ a, b } = dict
obj      = { a, b }

Destructured assignments work well to pull things out of objects but they're not that useful for putting things back into objects. I think the closest you can get is to use a destructured array assignment:

[ dict.a, dict.b ] = [ a, b ]

If you're working with several keys, then you could put the keys in an array and do the slicing and merging with loops (possibly wrapped in helper functions):

slice = (obj, keys...) ->
    s = { }
    s[k] = obj[k] for k in keys
    s

merge = (dest, src) ->
    dest[k] = src[k] for k of src
    return

keys = [ 'a', 'b' ]
dict = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
s = slice(dict, keys...)
s.a += 6
s.b += 6
merge(dict, s)
# dict is now { a: 7, b: 8, c: 3 }

Or just use the Underscore, jQuery, ... utility functions.

share|improve this answer

In pure coffeescript:

extend = (a, others...) ->
  for o in others
    a[key] = val for key, val of o
  a

dict = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
{a, b} = dict

a = 5
b = 8

extend dict, {a, b}

console.log dict
#dict = { a: 5, b: 8, c: 3 }
share|improve this answer
    
Considiring that I am not using any framework and to not attend to write any helper function, the short answer to my original question is no? –  Amberlamps Nov 28 '12 at 20:21
    
Probably, I am not aware of another way without declaring your function. –  mutil Nov 28 '12 at 20:24

Assuming you are using underscore.js, I would do this:

dict = { a: 1, b: 2, c: 3 }
{a, b} = dict
...
dict = _.extend dict, {a:a, b:b}

As asawyer points out, there's a similar extend function in jQuery too.

share|improve this answer
    
_.extend modifies its first argument so you don't need the assignment. –  mu is too short Nov 28 '12 at 19:50
1  
Or better yet: _.extend dict, {a, b}. Also, _.extend will modify the dict object itself, so there's no need to re-assign it :) (edit: it seems mu is too short beat me to it hehe) –  epidemian Nov 28 '12 at 19:50
    
Considiring that I am not using any framework and to not attend to write any helper function, the short answer to my original question is no? –  Amberlamps Nov 28 '12 at 20:21
    
@Amberlamps: I think the short answer is no, the long rambling answer is below (or above depending on voting). –  mu is too short Nov 28 '12 at 20:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.