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I have 3rd level of normalization in my database(Oracle 11g on Unix)

One of the table has 80 columns(all basic data types only). My DBA asks why so many columns in one table. All the columns belongs to an entity in the business domain and it is perfectly normalized.

What should be the design consideration in limiting the number of columns in Oracle database.

How to justify table design rather than normalization. Is it really required to split the table into two just because of 80 columns.

Thank you, Smith

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1 Answer 1

The number of columns in a particular table could be a sign of a denormalized structure but in your case that is not the issue. The entity you're modelling requires 80 fields and that's what you need to tell your dba. He/she's probably just worried about bad design.

Also, arbitrarily splitting a table into two (with a one to one relationship between them) does not normalization make. You might only split a table into 1-to-1 if it optimized some of your processing. Did the dba recommend a split?

By the way: In software development (and any professional pursuit) you must not hope for understanding. You have to communicate it.

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Yes. Hope s/he understands that. All the data belongs to a form for which we collect the data from one web page. Data is as simple as linked to one application number. –  user1736299 Nov 28 '12 at 19:11
    
@user1736299: Right. This is more of a communication issue than db design. Just make sure the dba understands that this is the model. –  Paul Sasik Nov 28 '12 at 19:14
    
By the way: In software development (and any professional pursuit) you must not hope for understanding. You have to communicate it. –  Paul Sasik Nov 28 '12 at 19:20
    
In software development (and any professional pursuit) you must not hope for understanding. You have to communicate it. I like this statement. –  user1736299 Nov 28 '12 at 19:32
    
Paul Sasik, Can you post your reply as "answer". I would like to mark your reply as answer. –  user1736299 Dec 12 '12 at 22:19

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