Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know it's possible to override the HTML5 storage APIs by overriding Storage.prototype.getItem, setItem, removeItem and clear. But that will override those methods for both local storage and session storage.

Is it possible to just override one and not the other? Or to override both separately?

A little context: I have an existing app that makes very heavy use of both local storage and session storage. I want to add some temporary code to mirror the stuff in local storage in another storage mechanism, but I don't want to drag the session storage contents along with it.

I could update every reference to localStorage to call some wrapper function that could do the mirroring, but I really don't want to update all those calls. It would be way cleaner if I could localize this code by overriding a single set of storage methods.

share|improve this question
3  
I'm not sure but the fact that you are trying to override them at all is disturbing. –  Jeff Nov 28 '12 at 19:15
    
I added some context to the question. Independent of all that, I'm also just genuinely curious :) –  Dan M Nov 28 '12 at 19:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There are several possibilities to achieve what you want. But remember, none of them should be used in production environment.

The first option detects if setItem method was called by sessionStorage or localStorage object. You could write it this way:

var _setItem = Storage.prototype.setItem;

Storage.prototype.setItem = function(key, value) { 
    if (this === window.localStorage) {
         // do what you want if setItem is called on localStorage
    } else {
         // fallback to default action
         _setItem.apply(this, arguments);
    }
}

The second one, replaces prototype of sessionStorage or localStorage object. It may look like this:

localStorage.__proto__ = Object.create(Storage.prototype);
localStorage.__proto__.setItem = function() {
    // your logic here
}

Notice, that I used __proto__ pseudo property which is non-standard, but exposed in Chrome and Firefox. (Don't know about Opera, Safari and others). However, as you can see it might be helpful during development.

share|improve this answer
    
That first option is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  Dan M Nov 28 '12 at 20:38

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.