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I am training in reading Morsecode with my ears ;)

To train myself, I have written a little ruby script to generate the soundfiles using commandline sox (see below). It basically just takes pre-made soundfiles of dits, dahs and multiple spaces (bewteen dits and dahs, between letters and between words) and glues them together. It works, but is is getting increasingly slow the larger the target file gets.

Is there a smarter way of generating the sounds with ruby into a wav-file?


#!/usr/bin/ruby

wordlength = 5
blocklength = 12
testlength = 5
alphabet = [ "G", "A", "S", "5", "D", "0", "R", "/", "2", "L", "9", "T", "V", "I", "O", "Q", "C", "4", "F", "X", "E", "N", "U" ]
playstring = ""
block = ""
page = ""

MORSE = {
        "!" => "---.", "\"" => ".-..-.", "$" => "...-..-", "'" => ".----.",
        "(" => "-.--.", ")" => "-.--.-", "+" => ".-.-.", "," => "--..--",
        "-" => "-....-", "." => ".-.-.-", "/" => "-..-.", "0" => "-----",
        "1" => ".----", "2" => "..---", "3" => "...--", "4" => "....-", "5" => ".....",
        "6" => "-....", "7" => "--...", "8" => "---..", "9" => "----.", ":" => "---...",
        ";" => "-.-.-.", "=" => "-...-", "?" => "..--..", "@" => ".--.-.", "A" => ".-",
        "B" => "-...", "C" => "-.-.", "D" => "-..", "E" => ".", "F" => "..-.",
        "G" => "--.", "H" => "....", "I" => "..", "J" => ".---", "K" => "-.-",
        "L" => ".-..", "M" => "--", "N" => "-.", "O" => "---", "P" => ".--.",
        "Q" => "--.-", "R" => ".-.", "S" => "...", "T" => "-", "U" => "..-",
        "V" => "...-", "W" => ".--", "X" => "-..-", "Y" => "-.--", "Z" => "--..",
        "[" => "-.--.", "]" => "-.--.-", "_" => "..--.-", 
        "ka" => "-.-.-.",
}

startblock = "dit.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav wordspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav wordspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav wordspace.wav dah.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav wordspace.wav wordspace.wav wordspace.wav "
endblock = "dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav ditspace.wav dah.wav ditspace.wav dit.wav blockspace.wav "

playstring << "uebungsanfang.wav wordspace.wav "
system ('/opt/local/bin/sox ' + playstring.to_s + ' tmp.wav 2>/dev/null')
system ('mv tmp.wav tmp2.wav')
playstring = ""

testlength.times do |line|
    printf line.to_s + " "
    playstring << "gruppe" + (line+1).to_s + ".wav wordspace.wav "
    playstring << startblock
    system ('/opt/local/bin/sox tmp2.wav ' + playstring.to_s + ' tmp.wav 2>/dev/null')
    system ('mv tmp.wav tmp2.wav')
    playstring = ""
    blocklength.times do |count|
        word = alphabet.sample.to_s + alphabet.sample.to_s + alphabet.sample.to_s + alphabet.sample.to_s + alphabet.sample.to_s
        word.each_char do |char|
            MORSE[char].each_char do |dahdit|
                case dahdit
                    when '.' then playstring << "dit.wav "
                    when '-' then playstring << "dah.wav "
                end
                playstring << "ditspace.wav "
            end
            playstring << "letterspace.wav "
            system ('/opt/local/bin/sox tmp2.wav ' + playstring.to_s + ' tmp.wav 2>/dev/null')
            system ('mv tmp.wav tmp2.wav')
            playstring = ""
        end
        playstring << "wordspace.wav "
        block << word.to_s + " "
    end
    playstring << endblock
    playstring << "blockspace.wav "
    system ('/opt/local/bin/sox tmp2.wav ' + playstring.to_s + ' tmp.wav')  #2>/dev/null
    system ('mv tmp.wav tmp2.wav')
    playstring = ""
    page << "%02d" %(line+1).to_s + ": VVV <ak> " + block + "+" + "\n"
    block = ""
end
playstring << "uebungsende.wav"
system ('/opt/local/bin/sox tmp2.wav ' + playstring.to_s + ' tmp.wav 2>/dev/null') #  &
system ('rm tmp2.wav')
system ('mv tmp.wav cw.wav')
system ('lame --cbr -b 128 cw.wav cw.mp3')
system ('rm cw.wav')
puts
puts page

The soundfiles are pre-generated using sox:

sox -e floating-point -r 22500 -n -t wav - synth 0.3 sin 0 > letterspace.wav

The files containing Übungsende etc. (beginning of test, end of test, group one, two, ...) are generated using the MAc OS X command say:

say -v Steffi --file-format=WAVE --data-format=LEF32@22500 -o uebungsanfang.wav "Anfang der Übung."

I have uploaded the files (up to "Gruppe 5", ie. "group 5") here: https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B4QwMfBGRCjVbE5iZHpHMHBKT3c

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1 Answer 1

I don't know ruby, so I'm not totally sure I know what you are doing, but it seems like you are generating audio files representing dot, dash, space etc, and then using sox to concatenate the raw data from those files to a new file which you then convert to mp3 using lame.

All-in-all, this is pretty inefficient, mostly because you are doing so much with raw files that could be generated on the fly. That said, it's probably not worth rewriting in the most efficient possible manner -- doing all that file IO makes your code simple, after all. So I would rewrite the code so that the file IO is as fast as possible. In this case, having to open and parse WAV files over and over again, especially 32-bit floating point WAV files, is probably slowing you down. For what you are doing you absolutely do not need that. I would start by using 16-bit integer WAV files.

For even more speed, try a simpler format as your intermediates, like au (using u-law if it's good enough or 16-bit linear if not). You could also try "raw", aka "headerless" files -- just tell sox and lame the samplerate, bit-depth, endianness and number of samples to use. Then you don't need to use sox to concatenate the raw data, you can just use the "cat" unix tool, which aught to be a bit faster.

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Thank you, I was suspecting the IO to be the problem. I will try your suggestion asap (aka. as soon as I'm in the office ;). –  Christian Nov 29 '12 at 6:32

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