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I have an 'if-elif-else' block and if a value is within that range it is assigned a certain value. However it when I run it just assigns it the value in the else block. This is my code:

if mile < 300:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 1
elif mile>=300 and mile <2000:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 2
elif mile>=2000 and mile <5000:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 3
else:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 4

Mile returns a float, but I thought that this didn't matter as much as in Java for example.

Thanks

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4  
What is mile? What is mileInfo? What is the output/error you get you don't expect? –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 19:37
2  
As another note, Python supports 3-item comparisons, so you can do, for example, elif 300 <= mile < 2000: to simplify your code. That said, as you are in an elif, it'll only run if the value is more than 300 anyway, so it's pointless to check again. –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 19:38
    
value is mile which is a float and it just assigns miles to value 4. –  user94628 Nov 28 '12 at 19:39
1  
I'm not asking what type, I'm saying give us a runnable example with values that produce the problem you experience. Give us a value that when we do miles = x it has the problem you get. –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 19:40
1  
after the else, include print mile, type(mile), and see why you always get catched by the else in the first place. Are you sure mile is not always larger than 5000? –  heltonbiker Nov 28 '12 at 19:41
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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Maybe mile is a string containing a number? It will not be automatically converted.

>>> "1" < 100
False
>>> "1" == 1
False

You don't need to have the elif re-check that the previous if was false. If the value wasn't < 300, it is guaranteed to be >=300.

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(+1) I like the way you're thinking –  NPE Nov 28 '12 at 19:40
    
Thanks mile is a float returns a value eg. 325.0124. It returns the difference between two points. I initially had the code as less than 300 elif less than 2000 elif less than 5000. But that wasn't working either so I changed it to what I have now. –  user94628 Nov 28 '12 at 19:44
1  
@user94628 please do a 'print type(mile)' and post the result as a comment. –  XORcist Nov 28 '12 at 19:48
    
@Anony-Mousse you were right mile was a string. –  user94628 Nov 28 '12 at 19:49
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The issue was that 'mile' was a string and as pointed out by other members string is not automatically converted. So I changed code to:

mileInt = int(float(mile))

if mileInt < 300:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 1
elif mileInt < 2000:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 2
elif mileInt < 5000:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 3
else:
    mileInfo['miles'] = 4

Using print type(mile) helps check what the type is.

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1  
Actually, mileInt = int(mile) should be enough. A pity that you unaccepted the earlier correct answer to just reiterate that it was correct. –  Anony-Mousse Dec 1 '12 at 14:56
    
@Anony-Mousse you're right, suggesting to check mile type was the solution to correcting my original code. I've accepted your answer in recognition of this. Thanks again for your help. –  user94628 Dec 2 '12 at 2:29
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