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I am looking for a better way, may be using list comprehensions?

>>> x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> x
[1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> for i in x:
...   if i!=1:
...     print "fail"
... 
>>> 
>>> x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]
>>> for i in x:
...   if i!=1:
...     print "fail"
... 
fail
>>> 
share|improve this question
4  
all(x) should work –  JBernardo Nov 28 '12 at 19:39
1  
Do you care what the result is when the list is empty, ie x = []? –  jimhark Nov 28 '12 at 20:33
3  
@jimhark If the list is empty, then proposition "every element of the list equals one" is vacuously true. –  Peter Olson Nov 29 '12 at 2:21
1  
@PeterOlson, yeah, I understand that. And in general reducing an empty list should return the identity element for the reduction function, which for and is True. I was asking the original poster if he cared. –  jimhark Nov 29 '12 at 3:46

8 Answers 8

up vote 78 down vote accepted
>>> x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> all(el==1 for el in x)
True

This uses the function all with a generator expression.


If you always have only zeroes and ones in the list (or if you want to just check if the list doesn't have any zeroes), then just use all without any additional tricks:

>>> x = [1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0]
>>> all(x)
False

Benchmark of some solutions:
The numbers mean what time in milliseconds it took to run the solution once (average of 1000 timeit runs)

Python 3.2.3

              all(el==1 for el in x): 0.0003 0.0008 0.7903 0.0804 0.0005 0.0006
                       x==[1]*len(x): 0.0002 0.0003 0.0714 0.0086 0.0045 0.0554
         not([1 for y in x if y!=1]): 0.0003 0.0005 0.4142 0.1117 0.1100 1.1630
                set(x).issubset({1}): 0.0003 0.0005 0.2039 0.0409 0.0476 0.5310
y = set(x); len(y)==1 and y.pop()==1:   WA   0.0006 0.2043 0.0517 0.0409 0.4170
                   max(x)==1==min(x):   RE   0.0006 0.4574 0.0460 0.0917 0.5466
                 tuple(set(x))==(1,):   WA   0.0006 0.2046 0.0410 0.0408 0.4238
not(bool(filter(lambda y: y!=1, x))):   WA     WA     WA   0.0004 0.0004 0.0004
                              all(x): 0.0001 0.0001 0.0839   WA   0.0001   WA  

Python 2.7.3

              all(el==1 for el in x): 0.0003 0.0008 0.7175 0.0751 0.0006 0.0006
                       x==[1]*len(x): 0.0002 0.0003 0.0741 0.0110 0.0094 0.1015
         not([1 for y in x if y!=1]): 0.0001 0.0003 0.3908 0.0948 0.0954 0.9840
                set(x).issubset({1}): 0.0003 0.0005 0.2084 0.0422 0.0420 0.4198
y = set(x); len(y)==1 and y.pop()==1:   WA   0.0006 0.2083 0.0421 0.0418 0.4178
                   max(x)==1==min(x):   RE   0.0006 0.4568 0.0442 0.0866 0.4937
                 tuple(set(x))==(1,):   WA   0.0006 0.2086 0.0424 0.0421 0.4202
not(bool(filter(lambda y: y!=1, x))): 0.0004 0.0011 0.9809 0.1936 0.1925 2.0007
                              all(x): 0.0001 0.0001 0.0811   WA   0.0001   WA  

[PyPy 1.9.0] Python 2.7.2

              all(el==1 for el in x): 0.0013 0.0093 0.4148 0.0508 0.0036 0.0038
                       x==[1]*len(x): 0.0006 0.0009 0.4557 0.0575 0.0177 0.1368
         not([1 for y in x if y!=1]): 0.0009 0.0015 175.10 7.0742 6.4390 714.15 # No, this wasn't run 1000 times. Had to time it separately.
                set(x).issubset({1}): 0.0010 0.0020 0.0657 0.0138 0.0139 0.1303
y = set(x); len(y)==1 and y.pop()==1:   WA   0.0011 0.0651 0.0137 0.0137 0.1296
                   max(x)==1==min(x):   RE   0.0011 0.5892 0.0615 0.1171 0.5994
                 tuple(set(x))==(1,):   WA   0.0014 0.0656 0.0163 0.0142 0.1302
not(bool(filter(lambda y: y!=1, x))): 0.0030 0.0081 0.2171 0.0689 0.0680 0.7599
                              all(x): 0.0011 0.0044 0.0230   WA   0.0013   WA  

The following test cases were used:

[] # True
[1]*6 # True
[1]*10000 # True
[1]*1000+[2]*1000 # False
[0]*1000+[1]*1000 # False
[random.randint(1, 2) for _ in range(20000)] # False

WA means that the solution gave a wrong answer; RE stands for runtime error.


So my verdict is, Winston Ewert's x==[1]*len(x) solution is the fastest in most cases. If you rarely have lists of all ones (the data is random, etc.) or you don't want to use additional RAM, my solution works better. If the lists are small, the difference is negligible.

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome, Thanks for the help! –  daydreamer Nov 28 '12 at 19:41
7  
There should be one-- and preferably only one --obvious way to do it. –  applicative_functor Nov 28 '12 at 19:49
2  
@RohitJain And then you needed 30 seconds per character to write your comment :P –  phant0m Nov 28 '12 at 20:10
    
@phant0m.. hah ;) Went somewhere after answering. –  Rohit Jain Nov 28 '12 at 20:13
1  
I disagree on the verdict. The x==[1]*len(x) is not necessary the best, but the fastest. For readability purposes I would suggest the all(el==1 for el in x). So best just depends on where you are optimizing for. (Btw, if you are using python and care about such a small perfomance improvements, you are using the wrong language) –  Peter Smit Nov 29 '12 at 14:19

Yet more possible methods:

x == [1] * len(x)

list(set(x)) == [1]

tuple(set(x)) == (1,)

Some timing results:

all(el==1 for el in x)                   [1.184262990951538, 1.1856739521026611, 1.1883699893951416]
y = set(x);len(y) == 1 and y.pop() == 1  [0.6140780448913574, 0.6152529716491699, 0.6156158447265625]
set(x) == set([1])                       [0.8093318939208984, 0.8106880187988281, 0.809283971786499]
not(bool(filter(lambda y: y!=1, x)))     [1.615243911743164, 1.621769905090332, 1.6134231090545654]
not any(i!=1 for i in x)                 [1.1321749687194824, 1.1325697898864746, 1.132157802581787]
x == [1]*len(x)                          [0.3790302276611328, 0.3765430450439453, 0.3812289237976074]
list(set(x)) == [1]                      [0.9047720432281494, 0.9006211757659912, 0.9024860858917236]
tuple(set(x)) == (1,)                    [0.6586658954620361, 0.6594271659851074, 0.6585478782653809]

And on PyPy because: why not?

all(el==1 for el in x)                   [0.40866899490356445, 0.5661730766296387, 0.45672082901000977]
y = set(x);len(y) == 1 and y.pop() == 1  [0.6929471492767334, 0.6925959587097168, 0.6805419921875]
set(x) == set([1])                       [0.956063985824585, 0.9526000022888184, 0.955935001373291]
not(bool(filter(lambda y: y!=1, x)))     [0.21160888671875, 0.1965351104736328, 0.19921493530273438]
not any(i!=1 for i in x)                 [0.44970107078552246, 0.509315013885498, 0.4380669593811035]
x == [1]*len(x)                          [0.5422029495239258, 0.5407819747924805, 0.5440030097961426]
list(set(x)) == [1]                      [1.0170629024505615, 0.9520189762115479, 0.940842866897583]
tuple(set(x)) == (1,)                    [0.9174900054931641, 0.9112720489501953, 0.9102160930633545]
share|improve this answer
5  
x == [1]*len(x) i hadn't thought of that one, that's ingenious. –  kreativitea Nov 28 '12 at 22:41
1  
bitarray(x).all() can you put this up, too? Under my testing (i offloaded the import to the setup since it's a one time cost), it even beats x == [1]*len(x) by about six percent. –  kreativitea Nov 28 '12 at 22:46
    
@WinstonEwert +1, this answer belongs at the top –  sampson-chen Nov 28 '12 at 22:47
1  
I'm surprised that x == [1]*len(x) is so fast. –  Russell Borogove Nov 29 '12 at 0:28
1  
The timing results here seem biased to me. What is x? A long list of ones, I bet, which is the worst case for the all... solution. –  Oleh Prypin Nov 29 '12 at 8:21

In addition to the all() answer already provided, you can also do it with set():

>>> x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> y = set(x)
>>> len(y) == 1 and y.pop() == 1
True

>>> a = [1, 1, 1, 1, 0]
>>> b = set(a)
>>> len(b) == 1 and b.pop() == 1
False

Caveat; (and Redeeming Factor):

  • As some have pointed out, this is less readable; however...
  • I'll leave this up since:
    • As the results in @WinstonEwert's answer demonstrate, this solution can perform better than the all() solution proposed by @BlaXpirit
    • I think most members of StackOverflow prefer to learn new things; alternative solutions contribute to that end by prompting discussion, inquiry, and analysis.
share|improve this answer
12  
If there are any clear disadvantages to this solution that I don't realize, I'd totally welcome learning something new; but I didn't think StackOverflow discouraged the discussion of alternative solutions. –  sampson-chen Nov 28 '12 at 19:50
1  
It's going to be less efficient as it has to go through all of the elements to make a set before doing the check (no short-circuiting), and it's also far, far less readable. –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 19:56
6  
@Lattyware, it can be hard to tell what's less efficient unless you test. This approach, cleaned up a bit can be more efficient in general for lists up to 20 elements and it's worst case timing is always better. Code doesn't look good in a comment so I'm posting an answer with more information. –  jimhark Nov 28 '12 at 20:29
4  
+1. This answer is correct and unique with a performance profile that is beneficial in many cases. I hope down voters reconsider. –  jimhark Nov 28 '12 at 20:56
1  
@sampson-chen See Peter-Olson comment on the question. x=[] returns true is more consistent. In actual problem, the empty case may be meaningless or be a special case where false is required. –  MatthieuW Nov 29 '12 at 16:13

@sampson-chen had a good idea that could use some help. Consider up voting his answer and look at this this as an extended comment. (I don't know how to make code look good in a comment). Here's my rewrite:

>>> setone = set([1])
>>> x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> set(x) == setone
True

This code does not exactly match the original question because it returns False for an empty list which could be good or bad but probably doesn't matter.

Edit

Based on community feedback (thanks @Nabb), here is a second rewrite:

>>> x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]
>>> set(x).issubset({1})

This properly handles the case where x is an empty list.

I think this is readable. And the variant part is faster as written (almost twice as fast). In fact, on my Python 2.7 system, it's always faster for lists up to 20 elements and for lists that are all 1's. (Up to 3 times faster.)

Update: Vacuous Truth and Reduction of an Empty List

@Peter Olson wrote in a comment:

If the list is empty, then proposition "every element of the list equals one" is vacuously true.

Further discussion in the comments lead up to @sampson-chen writing:

I felt that it ought to be vacuously false; maybe someone in this post will eventually enlighten us on the semantics. – sampson-chen

Let's see what Python thinks:

>>> all([])
True

Well then how about:

>>> any([])
False

So why is that right? If you haven't run into this before it might be confusing. There's a way to think about that may help you understand and remember.

Let's back up a little bit and start with:

>>> sum(mylist)

Python's built-in function sum sums items of an iterable from left to right and returns the total. Thinking more abstractly, sum reduces an iterable by applying the addition operator.

>>> sum([])
0

The sum of nothing is 0. That's fairly intuitive. But what about this:

>>> product([])

Okay, it actually returns a name error because product doesn't exist as a built-in function. But what should it return? 0? No, the value of an empty product is 1. That's most mathematically consistent (click the link for a full explanation), because 1 is the identity element for multiplication. (Remember sum([]) returned 0, the identity element for addition.)

Taking this understanding of the special role the identity element plays, and returning to the original problem:

all([])

Is equivalent to reducing the list using the Boolean and operator. The identity element for and is True, so the result for the empty list is True.

any([])

The identity element for or is False, the same as the value of this expression.

share|improve this answer

This goes through the list and collects any terms that aren't 1. If those terms exist, then bool returns True and the answer is False.

not(bool(filter(lambda y: y!=1, x)))
share|improve this answer
1  
As soon as you use a lambda, filter() is probably slower than a list comprehension, and this inefficient as it doesn't short circuit. It's also horribly unreadable. –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 20:13
1  
+1 for a good approach, but I prefer the list comprehension version for it's objective 3.5x speed improvement and subjective increased readability. not([y for y in l if y !=1]) with the 3.5x speed improvement makes it twice as fast as @BlaXpirit's all(el==1 for el in x) for some common cases. If you're wondering why the double negative !=/not, this gives the correct answer for an empty list. –  jimhark Nov 29 '12 at 18:05

Some console examples using all()'s cousin any():

In [4]: x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1]

In [5]: not any(i!=1 for i in x)
Out[5]: True

In [6]: x = [1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0]
In [7]: not any(i!=1 for i in x)
Out[7]: False
share|improve this answer
1  
x = [0, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1] –  Oleh Prypin Nov 28 '12 at 19:39
9  
It seems really weird to reverse the logic for no reason. –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 19:44
6  
all() also short circuits. There is no difference. –  Lattyware Nov 28 '12 at 19:54
2  
@MarkAmery Well looking at the FAQ, I didn't find anything like "I can't post an inferior answer", and also read this, which clearly states that Read the question carefully. What, specifically, is the question asking for? Make sure your answer provides that – or a viable alternative. and I think my answer is a viable alternative, I am sorry If you're not impressed by my answer. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 28 '12 at 20:14
4  
@sampson-chen had a good idea. With a small improvement in implementation it is faster in some situations including the exact example provided in the original question. Please find it in your heart to un-down-vote him. His answer was correct and unique with a performance profile that is beneficial in many cases. –  jimhark Nov 28 '12 at 20:54

how about this :

lo = min(L)
hi = max(L)
if (lo != 1) and (hi != 1) and (lo != hi):
   print "fail"
share|improve this answer
1  
Or, shortened: max(x)==1==min(x) –  Oleh Prypin Nov 29 '12 at 9:37

Yet another way is:

arr = [1,1,1,1]
len(arr) == sum(arr) #True if arr is all 1's
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