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I have the following javascript code:

function testClass() {
    this.SaveValue = function (value) {
        var isInstance = value instanceof TestEnum;

        if (!isInstance) {
            return;
        }
     }
}

TestEnum = {
    VALUE_0: 0,
    VALUE_1: 1,
    VALUE_2: 2   
}

I create an instance of this object in the following way:

$(function () {
    var a = new testClass();
    a.SaveValue(TestEnum.VALUE_1);    
});

All I'd like to do is test that the value passed to the SaveValue function is actually the type of TestEnum. However, when I run this code I get the following error: Uncaught TypeError: Expecting a function in instanceof check, but got 1

Am I going about this the right way? I tried typeof but it only returns number which is not particularly useful to me.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are passing a number to the function in

a.SaveValue(TestEnum.VALUE_1);

Since TestEnum is simply an Object, and you are referencing a number property on that object, you're calling your function with a number. You should instead create a TestEnumValue object and use that for your Object's properties:

JSFiddle link for below

function testClass() {
    this.SaveValue = function (value) {
        var isInstance = value instanceof TestEnumValue;

        if (!isInstance) {
            return;
        }
     }
}

TestEnumValue = function(arg) {
   arg = arg ? arg : 0;  //  sensible default

   this.key = 'VALUE_' + arg;
   this.val = arg;
}

Level = {
    NumSpiders : new TestEnumValue(0),
    NumCreepers: new TestEnumValue(1),
    NumZombies : new TestEnumValue(2),
    NumChickens: new TestEnumValue  //  uses default enum value    
};

$(function() {
    var a = new testClass();
    a.SaveValue(Level.NumSpiders);

    $('#hi').text(Level.NumSpiders.key);
});
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Fantastic stuff - just what I need! –  Mansfield Nov 28 '12 at 20:17
    
Although this answers my question, it does bring a new problem to mind - when SaveValue is called it can be passed in a new TestEnumValue directly with any value in the constructor. I suppose there's no way around that.... –  Mansfield Nov 28 '12 at 20:26
    
You could harden the TestEnumValue to handle undefined args and just have it return the default key and value of your choice - see my edited answer. –  Andy Nov 28 '12 at 20:58
    
I don't want to discredit this answer, but isn't it essentially the same as mine? ;) –  Felix Kling Nov 30 '12 at 18:42
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You could create the values as instances of the "class":

function TestEnum(value) {
    this._value = value;
}

TestEnum.prototype.valueOf = function() {
    return this._value;
}

TestEnum.prototype.toString = function() {
    return 'TestEnum_' + this._value;
}

TestEnum.VALUE_0 = new TestEnum(0);
TestEnum.VALUE_1 = new TestEnum(1);

The following would work then:

TestEnum.VALUE_0 instanceof TestEnum

But it also means you'd have to explicitly access the numerical value of one value with .valueOf. In some cases JS will do this automatically for you (like in 5 + TestEnum.VALUE_1). Overriding toString so that you can use a value as property might also be necessary.

It really depends on your use case whether this is a viable solution.


Alternatively, if just want to test whether a value is part of the enum, you can have an additional property which holds all possible values:

TestEnum.values = {0: true, 1: true, ...};

And then test it with

value in TestEnum.values
// or more reliable (fails for inherited `Object` properties)
TestEnum.values.hasOwnProperty(value);

You could even automate this:

function collectValues(obj) {
    var values = {}; // or Object.create(null) if available
    for (var prop in obj) {
        if (obj.hasOwnProperty(prop)) {
            values[obj[prop]] = true;
        }
    }
    return values;
}

TestEnum.values = collectValues(TestEnum);

This will only reliably work for primitive values though and won't distinguish between the string "1" and the number 1.

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Interesting. Really, what I'm trying to do here is restrict the value that can be passed into that function to a certain subset of valid values. I could just go the simple route of saying if value == 1 || 2 || 3 etc, but I thought it would be a little more maintainable and make the code easier to read if I used a custom type rather than just throwing meaningless integers around. –  Mansfield Nov 28 '12 at 19:54
1  
Well, you could also just have a map with valid values: TestEnum.values = {0: true, 1: true, ...} and test a value with value in TestEnum.values. –  Felix Kling Nov 28 '12 at 19:56
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Edit

Here's an example of how you could do it.

function TestEnum(val) {
    this.vals = this.vals || [];
    if (this.vals.indexOf(val) == -1) console.log('nope: ' + val);
    else console.log('ok: ' + val);
}
(function() {
    var vals = {
        VALUE_0: 0,
        VALUE_1: 1,
        VALUE_2: 2
    };
    TestEnum.prototype.vals = [];
    for (var key in vals) {
        TestEnum[key] = vals[key];
        TestEnum.prototype.vals.push(vals[key]);
    }
})();

Now new TestEnum(TestEnum.VALUE_0); is OK, but if you try, say, new TestEnum(3), then it throws an exception.


This is a bit backwards -- x instanceof y means that x has been created as x = new y(). Since TestEnum isn't even a function, you can't create an instance of it, so this isn't going to work.

What you could do is maybe something like this:

function MyEnum(enumVal) { this.val = enumVal; }
a.SaveValue( new MyEnum(TestEnum.VALUE_1) );

Then check using isInstance = value instanceof MyEnum.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea - but it doesn't help me restrict values to an allowable range (see my comment on Felix King's answer). –  Mansfield Nov 28 '12 at 20:00
    
@Mansfield see my update for how to restrict the values... –  McGarnagle Nov 28 '12 at 20:22
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