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I am trying to create a basic web application that accepts text inputs on the "add queries" page and then displays them in the "search Queries" page. So far, I have successfully connected the database, and the website doesn't throw an error when I use it.

However, when I enter an input and click submit on the "Add Queries" page, the "Search Queries" page doesn't update or display any new inputs.

I think that there is something wrong in my code which isn't linking the inputs to the database.

UPDATE: Someone has mentioned that I don't call the methods "add_entry" and "show_entries" in my view subclass. However, shouldn't my main py file handle functions?

Here are some basic screenshots for the webapp that I am developing:

enter image description here

enter image description here

The following represents my py files:

This is my main py file (queries-Final2.py)

#functions
def show_entries():
    db = get_db()
    cur = db.execute('select title, columns, query, notes, tags from entries order by id desc')
    entries = [dict(title=row[0], columns=row[1],query=row[2],notes=row[3],tags=row[4]) for row in cur.fetchall()]
    return render_template('search-queries.html', entries=entries)

def add_entry():
    if not session.get('logged_in'):
    abort(401)
    db = get_db()
     db.execute('insert into entries (title, columns, query, notes, tags) values (?, ?)',
      [request.form['title'],
       request.form['columns'],
       request.form['query'],
       request.form['notes'],
       request.form['tags']
       ])
    db.commit()
     flash('New entry was successfully posted')
    return redirect(url_for('add-queries'))


# Routes
   app.add_url_rule('/',
   view_func=Main.as_view('main'),
   methods=["GET"])

   app.add_url_rule('/login/',
   view_func=Login.as_view('login'),
   methods=["GET", "POST"])

   app.add_url_rule('/search-queries/',
   view_func=SearchQueries.as_view('search-queries'),
   methods=["GET", "POST"])

   app.add_url_rule('/add-queries/',
   view_func=AddQueries.as_view('add-queries'),
   methods=["GET", "POST"])

   app.add_url_rule('/edit-queries/',
   view_func=EditQueries.as_view('edit-queries'),
   methods=["GET", "POST"])

As well as the class files:

This is my "Search Queries" page view

class SearchQueries(flask.views.MethodView):
  @utils.login_required
  def get(self):
    return flask.render_template('search-queries.html')

This is my "Add Queries" page view

class AddQueries(flask.views.MethodView):
  @utils.login_required
  def get(self):
    return flask.render_template('add-queries.html')

  def post(self):
    return flask.render_template('search-queries.html')

These are my html files:

This is my "add queries" html page

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% block content %}
<h1 class="pageHeader" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/html">Add a query</h1>
<h3 class="pageSubHeader">Sooo many queries to add</h3>
<form action="{{ url_for('add-queries') }}" method=post class=add-entry>
    <dl>
        <dt>Title:
        <dd><input type=text size=54 name=title>
        <dt>Columns: (Store ID, Date, transaction-total, etc... )
        <dd><textarea name=columns rows=5 cols=40></textarea>
        <br>
        <dt>Query: (The text of the query)
        <dd><textarea name=query rows=5 cols=40></textarea>
        <br>
        <dt>Notes: (Anything that the analyst should note)
        <dd><textarea name=notes rows=5 cols=40></textarea>
        <br>
        <dt>Tags: (traffic, conversion, etc... )
        <dd><input name=tags type=text size=54>
        <br>
        <dd><input type=submit value="Submit query">
    </dl>
</form>
{% endblock %}

This is my "search queries" html page

{% extends "layout.html" %}
{% block content %}
    <h1 class="pageHeader">Have fun searching for queries</h1>
    <h3 class="pageSubHeader">Search for a large query</h3>
    <ul class=entries>
      {% for entry in entries %}
         <li><h2>{{ entry.title }}</h2>{{ entry.columns|safe }}
      {% else %}
          <li><em>Unbelievable.  No entries here so far</em>
      {% endfor %}
    </ul>
{% endblock %}

There may be something really obvious that I am missing so any help here would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!

  • Lowly intern

UPDATE: my database uses SQLite3

and the schema.sql file is as follows:

drop table if exists entries;
create table entries (
  id integer primary key autoincrement,
  title string not null,
  columns string not null,
  query string not null,
  notes string not null,
  tags string not null
 );

Question: In the example that I was looking at, the developer used

 @app.route('/add/')

before declaring the function. What does this do?

share|improve this question
3  
I dont get the question. And really a lot of code in here. – alexvassel Nov 28 '12 at 20:07
    
agreed with alex, your question is not clear, not even sure what your intending to do. – i_4_got Nov 28 '12 at 20:11
    
I updated the question to make what I am asking more clear. Basically, I have no idea why the inputs are not showing up in the database. – matt hoover Nov 28 '12 at 21:00
    
entries = [dict(title=row[0], text=row[1]) for row in cur.fetchall()] but <li><h2>{{ entry.title }}</h2>{{ entry.columns|safe }}. Inconsistently named field columns/text is your first problem. – jdotjdot Nov 28 '12 at 21:07
    
Second, you need to give us more clarity as to your question. Fix the formatting; I can't tell where your functions end. Also, you need to add the titles to every single document, because I can't tell which html file belongs to which Python function, etc. – jdotjdot Nov 28 '12 at 21:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're right, nowhere in your code do you actually call your add_entries and show_entries functions.

I'm not a fan of view classes, so I've never used them, however, would you not do something like this:

class AddQueries(flask.views.MethodView):
  @utils.login_required
  def get(self):
    return flask.render_template('add-queries.html')

  def post(self):
    db = get_db()
    db.execute('insert into entries (title, columns, query, notes, tags) values (?, ?, ?, ?, ?)',
    [request.form['title'],
     request.form['columns'],
     request.form['query'],
     request.form['notes'],
     request.form['tags']
    ])
    db.commit()
    flash('New entry was successfully posted')
    return flask.render_template('search-queries.html')

so basically, when you POST something to the AddQueries view, it actually inserts it into the database. Similarly, your ShowQueries class would need to actually run the code currently in your show_entries() function.

share|improve this answer
    
What implementation would you use if you are not using the view classes? – matt hoover Dec 3 '12 at 21:58
    
I'm not saying classes are a bad way to do it, I just don't like the separated routing and 'magic' methods like get() and whatever. My brain struggles to track it all! – MalphasWats Dec 4 '12 at 11:49

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